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Thread: moving out questions

  1. #1

    Smile moving out questions

    aye
    so im planning on moving out when i'm 20, i just want to ask you guys (for the people who have moved out) what was it like? is it as hard as you were told? have you got any suggestions? everything that you felt was hard, or easy, please mention it
    jake.

  2. #2

    Default

    Moving is pretty hard for some people with physical limitations. That includes moving heavy furniture, and other belongings. Also finding a place to live the way the economy is, is going to get difficult. When my parents moved for the last time, I had to stay with my father until the move ended, because it would have been too stressful for me. But when I got the new house, I had to take alot of time unpacking my books and stuff. When I met my girlfriend, I had to move again, but that move was easy because my stuff was brought to me, but it was very stringous and time consuming to lift heavy objects.

  3. #3

    Default

    Depending on how mature, prepared and responsible you are, it could be relatively easy, or quite difficult. For me, it was a an epically disastrous catastrophe that I'm proud to have experienced, survived and learned from.

    Here's what you need to realize, and be able to keep at the forefront of your brain - I know, because these are all things that I was quite bad at.

    1. You need proper priorities when you're on your own. Rent + Necessary bills + Groceries > Partying, booze and fast food.
    2. Fast food is not an effective substitute for actual groceries - instant gratification with a 500% markup means you'll get fat, and then starve when you run out of money.
    3. Have one, or maybe two credit cards, but do not live in debt. Do not use these cards for cash advances. Always pay at least the minimum payment, or they will come and kick your ass, metaphorically speaking anyway.
    4.Have a job. You need a job. When I say job, I mean something that pays a reasonable living wage and gives you a sense of satisfaction at having accomplished something worthwhile, with the bonus of a built in, possibly superficial social life. Don't work in a call center, unless you get turned on by being yelled at.
    5. Clean up after yourself. I'm still working on that one, 12 years into my independence.
    6. Don't let anything or anyone take over your life. If you play WoW, don't forget to walk the dog or watch a good movie that doesn't involve orcs or elves. If you like diapers, don't indulge 24/7, 365. If you have a girlfriend or boyfriend, don't forget to have other friends too.
    7. Don't 'buy' a house, unless you're planning on turning it into an income properly or are married with two incomes adding up to over 100,000 yearly and have a string of kids and dogs and cats in tow. Real estate agents don't like it when people suggest that going into absurd amounts of debt for 35 years for the sake of being 'a real adult' as some ads explicitly state is a bad idea.
    8. Live within your means. This really covers all of the previous items, it's just a really important mindset to have, I think.

  4. #4

    Default

    Moving is only as hard as you make it. Every time I've moved, I just got a rental trunk, a few cases of beer, and called my friends. Some stuff got dinged up, but its not like I've got a bunch of Picasso's or $20k sofas. LIVING on your own is something that requires planning. BEFORE you make the jump, you need to weigh expenses vs. income to figure out what you can afford in terms of rent, utilities, furniture, food, etc. I was forced into it when my parent's house burned down, but at the time I already had a paid-for vehicle, a good job, and money in the bank, so it was just an issue of finding a suitable place that wasn't ridiculously expensive.

    Consult with parents and/or friends who are paying bills on their own to get a realistic idea of monthly expenses in the area you want to live.

  5. #5
    Cherub

    Default

    All these suggestions are good. Since you seem to have a good amount of time on your hands before you move I will tell you how I bought all my stuff and organized it.

    First I bought ten 30 gallon totes. Next I made a list of everything I would need to furnish my apartment and divided that list into rooms (bedroom, bathroom, living room, kitchen, ect). I filled my list by imagining my daily life step-by-step in detail. I would think,,ok,, first thing I do in a day is wake up,,so, I need a bed, sheets, blankets. Put that on my list under 'bedroom stuff'. Then I think,, after I get up I go take a shower. So I will need towels, wash clothes, bathroom rugs, shower curtain, ect. I would put those items on the bathroom list. Then I imagine after getting out of the shower, I'd go to the kitchen and get breakfast. So I would need cooking utensils, pots & pans, a coffee maker, plates, bowls plates and silverware, ect. So I put all that in the list under kitchen. So I did this until I had everything I could possibly think of.

    Next, I bought at least 1 item on my list every payday. If the items were cheap enough I bought several items on the list. It took me a good while, but eventually I had everything purchased and stored in those large plastic totes. Next I saved up enough for a security deposit and 1 months rent. Then I looked for a good place to move into. Once I located the place I liked I signed the lease, paid my deposit and first month's rent and got my stuff and moved in. I was able to pull all this off without straining my budget.

    The major thing you need to remember is that your income is no longer disposable as it used to be. You now have responsibilities that come before play time. Balance your budget. That means don't let your rent and utilities consume too much of your income. Same with your transportation. Remember it's not just the car payment, but insurance as well as gas, oil and maintenance. You should be able to put at least a little aside into the bank for any unforeseen future situations or mishaps. All the budget boils down to is: never spend more than you make.

    With this much time ahead of you, you should do fine in your planning. Good luck!

  6. #6

    Default

    Including these already sound concepts presented - here is one from me -

    It is exceptionally difficult to start on one's own when you are that age. I moved 5 hours away from home immediately after i graduated high school back in 2004 and attended college in a location different from where i grew up. I had to get a job and attend class at the same time to pay for the things that my meager scholarships didn't, lol. All of this stress while i was still trying to stay somewhat involved as a TB/DL (at the time) im my private life. My best advice, learn to communicate really well with people even if you don't agree or get along. It is much easier to be self sustaining if you dont have to work against people and have people working against you. It's all in the psychological mindset of the individual, i think. Learning to flow easily and adapt to your surroundings is the best way to maintain sanity when faced with major, life altering circumstances. I made it ok and I think that you will to. Just have the courage to do what you can and dont give up. Hope that helps.

  7. #7

    Default

    The labor part as most have mentioned is easly delt with, surviving finanitally is another matter, roomates are undependable, rent, electric bill, phone bill, cable bill, internet bill, food, gas and so many other drains on the wallet are what you have to be prepared for. It's tough but very rewarding!
    Good Luck!

  8. #8

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by Hobbes View Post
    Depending on how mature, prepared and responsible you are, it could be relatively easy, or quite difficult. For me, it was a an epically disastrous catastrophe that I'm proud to have experienced, survived and learned from.

    Here's what you need to realize, and be able to keep at the forefront of your brain - I know, because these are all things that I was quite bad at.

    1. You need proper priorities when you're on your own. Rent + Necessary bills + Groceries > Partying, booze and fast food.
    2. Fast food is not an effective substitute for actual groceries - instant gratification with a 500% markup means you'll get fat, and then starve when you run out of money.
    3. Have one, or maybe two credit cards, but do not live in debt. Do not use these cards for cash advances. Always pay at least the minimum payment, or they will come and kick your ass, metaphorically speaking anyway.
    4.Have a job. You need a job. When I say job, I mean something that pays a reasonable living wage and gives you a sense of satisfaction at having accomplished something worthwhile, with the bonus of a built in, possibly superficial social life. Don't work in a call center, unless you get turned on by being yelled at.
    5. Clean up after yourself. I'm still working on that one, 12 years into my independence.
    6. Don't let anything or anyone take over your life. If you play WoW, don't forget to walk the dog or watch a good movie that doesn't involve orcs or elves. If you like diapers, don't indulge 24/7, 365. If you have a girlfriend or boyfriend, don't forget to have other friends too.
    7. Don't 'buy' a house, unless you're planning on turning it into an income properly or are married with two incomes adding up to over 100,000 yearly and have a string of kids and dogs and cats in tow. Real estate agents don't like it when people suggest that going into absurd amounts of debt for 35 years for the sake of being 'a real adult' as some ads explicitly state is a bad idea.
    8. Live within your means. This really covers all of the previous items, it's just a really important mindset to have, I think.
    I really, really like this list! Well done, good sir!

    As for my piece...

    It's already been laid out pretty well, so I will merely offer my sincere wishes that it goes smoothly for you. Luckily, you have a bit of time to look around, but please, don't wait until the last moment and take the first available place you find. There are the basics, such as budget forecasting (not as arduous as it sounds), the psychological shift (difficult or easy, depends on the person) and the actual move (friends and fair compensation are a must). However, also be sure to check out the company you are renting from. Many are inattentive at best, downright criminal at worst.

    I have run the gambit from management companies that people guffawed at upon my telling them to ones who leave out cookies for when you drop by the rent check. Check out reviews from others of the complex and the associated caretakers. Since they are the gatekeepers when it comes to maintenance, dealing with rude neighbors, and equitable lease terms, a good manager is crucial to enjoying your new life.

    Just my two cents. When the day arrives, enjoy your new-found freedom! ^^

  9. #9

    Default

    I have to disagree with Hobbes about the part regarding not buying a house. If you can afford the extra every month, buying is not a bad idea.

    Why would I put $700 a month into someone else's pocket when I can put $1100 towards my mortgage and have a roommate or two give ME $600 each(goes to a lump sum payment against the principle and to cover the extra amount over renting)? The whole time I'll be building equity in a piece of land and a house that I own. When it comes time for me to start a family, I simply get my roommates to move out, by that time I have payed off a ton more that if I had lived alone.

    On topic: Don't move out until you are ready. If you are going to school in your home town, try and stay at home while you attend classes.

    If you get a roommate, make sure they are a good match with you. Meet them first, find out about them and ALWAYS have a good lease written up.

  10. #10

    Default

    All good advise, so I'll add this. My first apartment was the upstairs of a house. The rent was cheap as were the utilities. It came furnished with shoddy furniture, which was good enough. It gave me a starting place where I could learn to keep a budget and gain the discipline to balance my check book.

    Always pay first the things you need for survival, such as rent and utilities. Gas money will be next. My first job I made so little money that there were times I walked to work, because I went out to eat one too many times.

    The other thing that is important is that you can become depressed living alone, eating alone and having little money for anything extra. I think that making and having friends is important. There are cheap fun things to do like going to a park, flying a kite on a windy day, riding a bike if you have one.

    I was part of an older church youth group, and I met my wife there. We combined incomes and bought our first house. It was old and cheap, but ours. Eventually she stopped working as we had our first child, but we got by. If you run your life right, you get raises, change to better jobs, etc. and more income flows. It all takes time, but nothing ventured, nothing gained.

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