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Thread: Making an AIO cloth diaper help.

  1. #1

    Default Making an AIO cloth diaper help.

    My 2 yards of fabric that has Blaziken came in a few weeks ago and I want to make a AIO[all in one]cloth diaper out of it for me.


    So im asking if you know what other materials I need to buy,im going to make it like the Huggies diapers.

    Im taking sewing class so I can allways get help.


    Im broke right now but next month I get $35 and what you say ill put on my shopping list.I cannot order with a card since I cannot efford one.


    If you can help,ill reward you with pic's next month[not lieing,just that my laptops been busted lately]of the first Pokemon diaper.

  2. #2

    Default

    Hi, MegaChar!

    What a great project.

    PUL, Vinyl, and PVC are among the more common waterproof materials used for diaper covers and plastic pants. Not being the sewing type, I'm afraid I can't be more specific. One thing I will add, however, is that by joining the diaper and the cover together, you'll be looking at much longer drying times. Vinyl of the sort used for plastic pants isn't safe to dry. Neither is PVC, though it is used on some AIOs (you just have to line-dry them, which takes forever!). PUL can go in the dryer on medium or low heat, but because it will be keeping moisture trapped in the diaper, you'll be running the dryer for a long time.

    Why am I saying this? Well, you might consider making a separate fitted diaper and PUL cover. They'd be easier to make as separates, and easier to care for.

    Just a thought!

  3. #3

    Default

    You might want to try buying some snap on plastic pants and sewing them on, that may also give you a cool design.

  4. #4

    Default

    I would really recommend making a pocket diaper. AIO diapers, due to their thickness, are a real pain to dry--not to mention the waterproof layer can create problems with washing during the spin cycle (still-soggy diaper). Really, they take forever to launder and still never seem to dry properly, leading to the possibility of bacterial growth (bad smells). I made a contoured diaper out of 12+ layers of flannel with velcro fasteners. 2-3 hours on high in a dryer was still not enough to dry it completely; I cannot recount how many times I almost got caught by my mom because of how long that thing took to dry. I did get caught once. If it was like normal clothes (dry after one run through the dryer), it wouldn't have been such a problem--but taking up the dryer for an entire afternoon is sort of conspicuous.

    Pocket diapers, on the other hand, fit just like an AIO--except the absorbent layers can be removed for washing/drying. Here are really good instructions for making a pocket diaper: How to sew a Pocket Diaper

    It's for baby sizes only, but you can upscale the pattern easily; the tutorial recommends tracing a disposable diaper and adding 3/4" to all sides for seam allowances.

    I would recommend using the Blaziken fabric for the outer of the pocket diaper. Depending on how heavy the fabric is, I might do two layers instead of one and I would definitely reinforce the area where the fasteners go with an additional layer. Sew-on Velcro can be used for the fasteners, but it gets annoying when washing (snags thread on other clothes in the washer and gets filled with lint--Velcro will eventually stop working well). I use KAM snaps and also purchased the snap pliers (Snaps, Snap Presses, Pliers & More).

    I also recommend just keeping the waterproof layer separate. It's heaps easier to launder that way and the waterproof cover will last longer. If you still really want to have the waterproof layer attached to the diaper, PUL is the only thing I would recommend for that--however, it has the unfortunate tendency to wick moisture to the diaper outer, like cloth-covered disposables. And I have heard bad things about the PUL available at JoAnn Fabrics and other discount fabric stores; apparently the waterproofing has the tendency to delaminate--I haven't tried it myself, though. I have been pleased by the durability of whatever PUL that Snap-Ez 4 Life uses.

    You could order clear plastic pants to ensure the Blaziken fabric is visible. I like these, since they aren't vinyl and will last longer: No-wick Ultraflex Polyurathane Pants Nvuf Pull On Plastic Pants-cloth Diapers No-wick Polyurethane Pants Shown over Pull-on Day Diaper * Illustrative Pur Poses Only - Diaper. Unfortunately, they are a little pricey and would eat a lot of your budget.

    Finally, for fabric to stuff the pocket diaper or to use as a soaker in an AIO: I would look into getting actual diaper fabric. I have seen old-school gauze/birdseye cloth diapers in K*Mart, though it was a while ago. They are baby/toddler sized, but sometimes that can still work for a stuffer. Adult size cloth diapers can be gotten here: InControl Cloth Diapers or here: The AdultClothDiaper.Com Home Page or at the site that I linked for the plastic pants

    I know you can't order with a card... that may or may not be a problem. The companies I have listed are small enough that perhaps they may accept a mailed money order if you ask.

  5. #5

  6. #6

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by Tygon View Post
    I would really recommend making a pocket diaper. AIO diapers, due to their thickness, are a real pain to dry--not to mention the waterproof layer can create problems with washing during the spin cycle (still-soggy diaper). Really, they take forever to launder and still never seem to dry properly, leading to the possibility of bacterial growth (bad smells). I made a contoured diaper out of 12+ layers of flannel with velcro fasteners. 2-3 hours on high in a dryer was still not enough to dry it completely; I cannot recount how many times I almost got caught by my mom because of how long that thing took to dry. I did get caught once. If it was like normal clothes (dry after one run through the dryer), it wouldn't have been such a problem--but taking up the dryer for an entire afternoon is sort of conspicuous.

    Pocket diapers, on the other hand, fit just like an AIO--except the absorbent layers can be removed for washing/drying. Here are really good instructions for making a pocket diaper: How to sew a Pocket Diaper

    It's for baby sizes only, but you can upscale the pattern easily; the tutorial recommends tracing a disposable diaper and adding 3/4" to all sides for seam allowances.

    I would recommend using the Blaziken fabric for the outer of the pocket diaper. Depending on how heavy the fabric is, I might do two layers instead of one and I would definitely reinforce the area where the fasteners go with an additional layer. Sew-on Velcro can be used for the fasteners, but it gets annoying when washing (snags thread on other clothes in the washer and gets filled with lint--Velcro will eventually stop working well). I use KAM snaps and also purchased the snap pliers (Snaps, Snap Presses, Pliers & More).

    I also recommend just keeping the waterproof layer separate. It's heaps easier to launder that way and the waterproof cover will last longer. If you still really want to have the waterproof layer attached to the diaper, PUL is the only thing I would recommend for that--however, it has the unfortunate tendency to wick moisture to the diaper outer, like cloth-covered disposables. And I have heard bad things about the PUL available at JoAnn Fabrics and other discount fabric stores; apparently the waterproofing has the tendency to delaminate--I haven't tried it myself, though. I have been pleased by the durability of whatever PUL that Snap-Ez 4 Life uses.

    You could order clear plastic pants to ensure the Blaziken fabric is visible. I like these, since they aren't vinyl and will last longer: No-wick Ultraflex Polyurathane Pants Nvuf Pull On Plastic Pants-cloth Diapers No-wick Polyurethane Pants Shown over Pull-on Day Diaper * Illustrative Pur Poses Only - Diaper. Unfortunately, they are a little pricey and would eat a lot of your budget.

    Finally, for fabric to stuff the pocket diaper or to use as a soaker in an AIO: I would look into getting actual diaper fabric. I have seen old-school gauze/birdseye cloth diapers in K*Mart, though it was a while ago. They are baby/toddler sized, but sometimes that can still work for a stuffer. Adult size cloth diapers can be gotten here: InControl Cloth Diapers or here: The AdultClothDiaper.Com Home Page or at the site that I linked for the plastic pants

    I know you can't order with a card... that may or may not be a problem. The companies I have listed are small enough that perhaps they may accept a mailed money order if you ask.
    Im back on my reply...

    Thank you so much for the help,this info will difantly help me out alot.


    My budget got eaten up by life stuff so my cloth diaper project on hold right now but in a few months ill have some cash to spend so ill take your ideas to consideration.

  7. #7

    Default

    Cottontail - I've heard a number of times that PUL should be dried on high heat because it will reseal any leaks that have formed. It's designed to be autoclaved.

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