Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 26

Thread: Modelling with Maya

  1. #1

    Default Modelling with Maya

    I was wondering how good Maya's modelling capabilities are. Originally I was thinking about getting 3ds Max, but since I'm getting a Mac and after hearing how Maya is much better for animating, I'm probably going to end up going with Maya.Because of the way Maya is designed (i.e. its user interface and tools), is it rather tedious to create models with or is it really not too bad. I heard that 3ds is much better for models than Maya.

  2. #2

    Default

    Although I have never used Maya I can tell you that 3ds max is very confusing to work with, the over all setup and interface is fine but if your looking for ease of use I would do some research on both very carefully.

  3. #3

    Default

    Thanks for the reply. I always do TONS of research on this stuff, I just always make sure to include a thread as part of my research. I have a VERY, VERY small amount of exposure to 3ds Max (and any animating software for that matter) and it definitely is a little overwhelming at first. Most reviews I saw said that 3ds was more intuitive than Maya, but after seeing and using Maya a little, I have to disagree, but I need more experience with both before I can make a valid opinion. I'm hoping to master Maya first and then start to learn 3ds Max way, waaaaay down the road. From what I gather from most professional animators, trying to master both at the same time is a bad idea, but once you learn one, learning the other is extremely beneficial since many industries work with both.

  4. #4

    Default

    Both are confusing. Most professional level anything will be confusing, due to a massive feature set, app specific terminology etc.

    There are a lot of proponents for both, and at this point they are owned by the same company. It seems a lot of animators/sfx folks stick to maya, and game devs stick with 3dsmax. This isn't due to any specific feature set as much as the fact Maya took roots early on in the SFX industry and 3dsmx with games well before the two were bought out and saw their feature sets merging. I do know there at least were a few tools that each had the others didn't that people swore by, such as 3dsmax having a few additional tools that made UV unwrapping and simple geoetry modelling much easier, but plugins tend to gove those things.

    So really, just pic one and go with it. They are both widely used and supported, and if you learn one well the transition will be annoying but nothing major.

    Be sure to look into additional packages though, things like mudbox etc, that are basically becoming a standard. If you think you might buy any down the line you tend to get a better deal buying suits, or at least you used to.

  5. #5

    Default

    Thanks for the input frillyfoxy. I've heard the same exact thing with Maya being used more for cinematography while 3ds Max is generally used for game development.That's one of the reasons I'm going with Maya and plan on sticking with it for a while. I'm also definitely planning on getting a suite thanks to the crazy deals you get from education pricing (plus they give you HUGE savings regardless). It's freaking awesome! While the curriculum I'm practicing with uses zbrush, having more autodesk software can't be a bad thing (especially when the suites are cheaper than getting each part separately anyway). Ultimately, I want to work with Houdini and RenderMan, but the curriculum I'm taking (at Escape Studios) teaches with Maya plus I think learning with Maya will be a much better starting learning point and then once I get a grip on the techniques and dynamics of animating, I'll move on to Houdini.

  6. #6

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by XxThisGuyxX View Post
    Thanks for the input frillyfoxy. I've heard the same exact thing with Maya being used more for cinematography while 3ds Max is generally used for game development.That's one of the reasons I'm going with Maya and plan on sticking with it for a while. I'm also definitely planning on getting a suite thanks to the crazy deals you get from education pricing (plus they give you HUGE savings regardless). It's freaking awesome! While the curriculum I'm practicing with uses zbrush, having more autodesk software can't be a bad thing (especially when the suites are cheaper than getting each part separately anyway). Ultimately, I want to work with Houdini and RenderMan, but the curriculum I'm taking (at Escape Studios) teaches with Maya plus I think learning with Maya will be a much better starting learning point and then once I get a grip on the techniques and dynamics of animating, I'll move on to Houdini.
    Whew, one of the only areas I can speak as an expert on! My suggestion would be to start with whatever program the people around you are using. The hardest part of learning a package is getting stuck on the little things, so whatever package the smartest, friendliest guy you know is using... learn that! Sign up for cg forums. I'm not sure what the best max ones are, but for Maya cgtalk and creativecrash are the places to go. For Houdini, odforce and the sidefx forums. Maya/Max/XSI all have very similar workflows and interfaces, so once you are comfy in one it would not take you long to get up to speed in the other ones. Houdini is a whole different pile of beans. If you want to get into effects work, Houdini is the way the industry is shifting. It's kind of garbage for animation, modelling, texture work. A large majority of film places still have Maya as their core package. As for modelling, someone above mentioned Mudbox. Technically I think Mudbox is a step or 2 behind zBrush, however it has almost no learning curve. As soon as I opened it I already knew where things were and was making cool stuff. zBrush has that weird 2.5d stamping thing I could never wrap my head around.

    It sounds like you are trying out a bit of everything. That's great! The job market favors the generalist, even at the BIG studios. If you want to focus where the jobs are, aim to be a TD. Studios are throwing money at any effects artists they can find. Rigging is always a safe bet. If you are having trouble "breaking in" to the industry, put a couple of cloth/fur/hair shots on your reel and apply as a TD. The market is over saturated with junior modellers and animators, but can't find people to make a flag flap in the wind.

    Renderman... It's good, but man there are so many option out there now. Lots of places are using 3dlight. Houdini guys love Mantra. I used to be pretty big into Mental Ray, but I'll be honest and say I'm not an expert in renderers. I know Mantra, Renderman and Mental ray pretty well, but not enough that I could confidently compare them fairly.

    Anyway, I'll stop there for now. I've been doing cg for years and its my passion. Feel free to PM me if you want to chat or start a thread in the non-public EC area or whatever.

  7. #7

    Default

    Maya is definitely used in game development, Max was the dominant platform but I think it's evening out more. I have heard the film industry is more Maya centric though. The real truth is most game engines don't care too much about what program your model came from, as they will import it into their own proprietary format. If a studio has a preference, the chances of it being the one you chose is random, and if you move from studio to studio it might change between packages. It seems like in any part of the cg industry adaptability is a key skill, what is a standard one day is antiquated the next. The best bet is to be good with either, but for starting out just choose which one you like the most. I'm not an artist, so I can't offer much other useful comments other than that I like Maya's API more than Max's :P. As a sidenote, if you really want to increase your value pick up a book about how rendering systems work, such as Real-Time Rendering for game stuff (I don't have an example for film >.>). You don't need to be able to write your own graphics engine, but just enough to understand the medium. No matter what package you use, your medium is points of light plotted by mathematical models, and having a general understanding about how that all comes together is very useful.
    Last edited by LBcub; 05-Apr-2012 at 07:52.

  8. #8

    Default

    I've also heard that Maya is used (or is starting to be used) for some game design. I'm not sure if it's to make cut-scenes or if it actually creates assets to be used in the engine, but as I said, I've heard that it can be and is used for some game developing. I just got my new computer and downloaded A LOT (like 6 different programs) of Autodesk programs for free!. I love being a student, so I've finally got to get some hands on practice with each one. I've got to say, I prefer Maya more than 3ds Max, although at this point I've had much more practice with Maya so I'm probably bias. Now that I got the software, now begins the long process of mastering it, but I'm ready to take advantage of as many resources as possible by using all the books and tutorials I can get my hands on.

    That's a good suggestion to know how renderers work. While it may not be essential to know, being able to do slight edits to scripts here and there would be a valuable skill, not to mention I really have no idea how rendering engines work and would like to know(I have a vague idea though).

  9. #9

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by XxThisGuyxX View Post
    I just got my new computer and downloaded A LOT (like 6 different programs) of Autodesk programs for free!.
    I downloaded Maya a couple of weeks ago, and getting it for free was a treat. I still haven't played with it yet, but it might come in handy for an archaeology / 3D building reconstruction class I'm taking.

  10. #10

    Default

    @tj1189

    My thoughts exactly, it couldn't hurt to have. That's why I downloaded Maya plus the 5 additional programs. You never know what will come in handy, plus they're awesome programs. I'm sure Maya could be of some value in your archaeology/3D building reconstruction class, but I'd imagine there must be Autodesk CAD programs that might be more suited for your needs, although you probably already have these or know what you need to get.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 6
    Last Post: 21-Jun-2010, 05:10

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
ADISC.org - the Adult Baby / Diaper Lover / Incontinence Support Community.
ADISC.org is designed to be viewed in Firefox, with a resolution of at least 1280 x 1024.