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Thread: Do we ever really just grow up or do we just fit certain roles?

  1. #1

    Default Do we ever really just grow up or do we just fit certain roles?

    I find myself asking this question since I started my internship. They had this orientation on day one, where we met our supervisors. Everyone was dressed up and acting mature and what not. The following day was a barbecue picnic thing. It was rather surprising everyone was acting like a kid playing basketball kick ball and what not. This led Me to think that we truly don't change or mature we simply act ad the situation needs us to act.

    So we are all actors written just like acting as babies once in a while...that's something that I've been thinking about lately how everyone kinda regress maybe just maybe we truly never change just the way we act in scenarios. An example of this is parenthood most people say it changes you but I just think you Ned to fulfill a role life has presented you with... any thoughts or comments?
    Last edited by dragsnick; 15-Jun-2011 at 16:59.

  2. #2

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    That's how I've always kind of felt. In the right setting everyone matures but when free time hits nobodies afraid to act like a kid. So, I wholeheartedly agree with your assumptions. A quote I read once got brought to mind by this. "We never really mature we just learn how to act in public."

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by tyrannosaurusdex View Post
    "We never really mature we just learn how to act in public."
    Well, some of the guys in my school need to learn how to act in public sooner. I think it's gross how they go around pulling gay jokes on each other (how do you think the gay people think about that?) and dry humping each other. It's just sick, and the teachers can't do anything about it because it's happening so much, they can't keep up!

  4. #4

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    It's like the old saying -

    Growing old is mandatory, but growing up is optional!

  5. #5

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    There's definitely something to that. I often refer to it as "Playing the game." You're at work, so you learn the rules for work, how the people interact, what level of interaction you can have with them and maintain some degree of comfort with the situation. You might joke around a lot with your co-workers, but everyone quiets up when the manager walks through. You're with the group of friends you hang out with on Mondays, so you learn the interactions between that group of people. They're all pretty chill, but avoid the politics and heavy topics, hug rather than wave. You're with your gaming group, and although they're also your friends, you behave slightly differently around them. They talk about politics and classism and the hot-button issues of the day. They're a bit more on-edge, and they don't hug, ever.



    That said, I think it's a bit of a stretch to say that we don't really mature. When we were legitimate children, we lacked the ability to discern which behaviors were appropriate around which people. We did the same behaviors, regardless of situation. Think of it as a baseline behavior. I would assert that maturity is less about changing as a person and is far more about learning how to interact with various people and behave in certain situations. I would also assert that our baseline behavior probably does remain the same, but that maturity is the ability to do additional behaviors (if that makes any sense). I mean, from what I remember and what my mom has said, I was a "good" kid, I was reasonably well-behaved, not prone to a lot of outbursts and the like, and now, I think that baseline is still intact.

  6. #6

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    Maturity IS being able to ACT appropiatily in a given stituation.

  7. #7

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    I mentioned in other posts that I always thought I had three personalities, especially when I was in school. One was my tough, cool school personality. It was a survival thing, growing up on the Jersey Shore.

    The second was around my parents. That was the I'm okay. Leave me alone.

    But then there was the me inside my head, the kid who didn't want to grow up, who was petrified of becoming an adult. That one has taken up permanent residency.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by xbabyx View Post
    There's definitely something to that. I often refer to it as "Playing the game." You're at work, so you learn the rules for work, how the people interact, what level of interaction you can have with them and maintain some degree of comfort with the situation. You might joke around a lot with your co-workers, but everyone quiets up when the manager walks through. You're with the group of friends you hang out with on Mondays, so you learn the interactions between that group of people. They're all pretty chill, but avoid the politics and heavy topics, hug rather than wave. You're with your gaming group, and although they're also your friends, you behave slightly differently around them. They talk about politics and classism and the hot-button issues of the day. They're a bit more on-edge, and they don't hug, ever.



    That said, I think it's a bit of a stretch to say that we don't really mature. When we were legitimate children, we lacked the ability to discern which behaviors were appropriate around which people. We did the same behaviors, regardless of situation. Think of it as a baseline behavior. I would assert that maturity is less about changing as a person and is far more about learning how to interact with various people and behave in certain situations. I would also assert that our baseline behavior probably does remain the same, but that maturity is the ability to do additional behaviors (if that makes any sense). I mean, from what I remember and what my mom has said, I was a "good" kid, I was reasonably well-behaved, not prone to a lot of outbursts and the like, and now, I think that baseline is still intact.
    I agree!

    The only thing I'll add is that (at least for me) a big part of goofing off with friends and co-workers (or "reverting to that childhood baseline" you mention) is the nostalgia of it. There is something cool about say... playing with nerf guns at the office. It is fun in it's own right, but somehow there is something extra special about doing that as an adult in a professional (well, as professional as a bunch of computer geeks get) setting.

    I guess in that view, our baseline behavior does change. There are a lot of things I would have enjoyed as a kid, but wouldn't enjoy now, and the things I still enjoy, I generally enjoy for different reasons.

  9. #9

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    I have definitely matured from when I was a kid, so I would say yes. I no longer have spontaneous urges like I used to and I don't find some of the old things I liked to do that fun anymore.

    I changed a lot during high school and in many ways I am far more mature than a lot of my peers.


    But I think a lot of us realize that a certain "face" needs to be adopted when we are in certain roles so we adjust our public "face" in order to fit those demands.

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