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Thread: Diaper Rash

  1. #1

    Default Diaper Rash

    This is somewhat of a companion thread to the diaper rash cream thread I created. This is more of an explanation of what diaper rash is and how it can best be treated and/or prevented.

    What is diaper rash?

    In simple terms, diaper rash is simply irritated skin that is often red, cracked and very painful. It can have blisters on it and is sometimes puffy.

    What can you do about diaper rash?

    Once you have diaper rash you will know.

    The first thing you will want to do is make yourself more comfortable.

    One sure thing you can do is to lie on a cotton blanket without your diaper.
    Another is to stand in front of a fan on low speed so that the air is directly hitting the diaper rash. Take a warm water bath, gently towel dry, apply pure Aloe Vera gel, and diaper as usual.

    If you prefer to use a powder, apply about 2 tablespoons full inside the diaper itself instead of directly on our skin.

    If you feel you must use an ointment, please do be careful, because once on, these are hard to remove and you may irritate the rash more than help.

    Since all ABies are unique individuals with different skin sensitivities, you will need to find what works best for you.

    How to prevent diaper rash?

    If you can, the best thing is to prevent getting this in the first place, but even at our best attempts you will probably at least have one or two. Your goal will be to minimize the chances the best you can.

    Again, since ABies have different skin types, you should probably find a diaper that is friendly to your skin as well as fewer leaks.

    After this step, you will want to keep as dry as possible and this does not mean checking to see if you are “wet” every 10 minutes. This means if you use baby wipes at every change, to pat dry with a cotton towel or air dry before closing the diaper.

    If you use cloth, do not use bleach or harsh detergents as these will rub on to your skin when you are wet. Instead wash these in very hot water and mild detergent. If you feel you must use bleach then be sure rinse them twice using 1 cup of vinegar in the first rinse to remove the bleach residue. This really does help.

    If you prefer disposable diapers, these are made to hold a lot of urine so you do not necessarily have to change immediately after wetting, but if the diaper is “dirty”, change it right away before the acid in the bowel movement starts irritating your skin.

    Be careful using powder on baby girls with every diaper change because some believe this can cause a yeast infection. An alternative is to make a mixture of half unscented Vaseline and pure aloe Vera gel, rub a light coat of this over her bottom to prevent the extra moisture from trapping to her delicate skin.

    Copyright Aya's Playroom 2001-2008. All rights reserved.

  2. #2

  3. #3

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by Martin View Post
    A very good help is A&D ointment! Does miracles believe me.
    ...and the zinc oxide cream has been a good one to use, as Ayanna pointed out in her other Diaper Rash thread.

    ~Pramrider

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by ayanna View Post
    [color=#ff0088]
    Be careful using powder on baby girls with every diaper change because some believe this can cause a yeast infection. An alternative is to make a mixture of half unscented Vaseline and pure aloe Vera gel, rub a light coat of this over her bottom to prevent the extra moisture from trapping to her delicate skin.
    Copyright Aya's Playroom 2001-2008. All rights reserved.
    This was probably the most interesting and helpful infomation from this post for me, even though I am not a girl! :p I will remember that for my next future gf! lol Thanks again Ayanna!

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