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Thread: DRM in general

  1. #1

    Default DRM in general

    Here is a good example of ignorance from game companies when it comes to piracy:

    from game politics Crytek Looking at DRM after Crysis 2 Leak | GamePolitics



    Crysis 2 Executive Producer Nathan Camarillo admitted in a recent GameShark interview that Crytek is looking at digital rights management solution for its PC titles. This closer look at a DRM solution was initiated by the leak of the PC game earlier this year to file-sharing sites around the world.

    "I know there's a lot of negative feelings toward DRM. But, I mean, what are we supposed to do? The actions of a few are causing maybe a mild inconvenience for others," Camarillo told GameShark.

    "If I'm playing a game and it has DRM on it, do I notice? Not really. I just know that there's something going on, but doesn't really enhance (sic) my play experience. So, it's something that we'll have to look at in the future."

    Expect Crysis 2 to use some sort of DRM solution when it is released this week. All we can hope for is that it isn't obnoxious.
    I personally think companies like Crytek need to realize that DRM is not going to stop their game from being pirated. This is very intriguing because no one is to blame except their own employees for the leak, why don't they realize that? DRM won't stop employees from leaking the game. What they instead should do is make sure this leak doesn't happen again. DRM is not going to help at all. Most games get their DRM cracked within a week, sometimes on the same exact day the game is released!

    I also think it's stupid that they blame the PC platform for piracy, when you can pirate PS3 and 360 games as well. Look at any torrent site for proof, there are lots of console copies for games available!

    What do you guys think about DRM in general? What DRM solution do you think has a good balance of Piracy protection and being customer friendly? I personally like SteamWorks the most, because it doesn't require you to keep the disc, it automatically updates the game for you, you can check the integrity of your game cache (that has really helped me fix my games, much better than reinstalling the game completely!) The only downsides are that you need a internet connection and you must have steam running to play your games. But I think the pros outweigh the cons!

  2. #2

    Default

    all drm does is make it harder for the core customer who is abiding by the law. What they should do is product activation. Only allow 1 product key to be registered so many times, and make it so no copies of the software are unlockable before the launch date except beta tester copies.
    .

  3. #3

    Default

    Almost all DRM infringes on the rights of the owner. There are three major rights of ownership that need considered;

    1) The right of use. This right is the most important to the average consumer. However most DRM systems fail on this to some degree. At the most extreme end you have systems that only allow a limited number of total installs and require frequent online verification. Then there is the more minor online activation system of many games. However even that interferes with a person's right of use.

    2) The right to modify. Most companies have a problem with this right. However depending on the DRM system in use they may or may not be able to suppress it. The biggest threat is from DRM systems that require periodic online verification. Some of those systems won't allow the verification to proceed, and thus prevent further use, if there is a modification to the code. Doing that is another way some companies deny customers their rights.

    3) The right to transfer ownership. This right includes not only the right to sell or give away, but also the right to lend. It is here that most DRM systems fail horribly. There are the digital distribution systems which outright prevent any transfer of ownership. Then there are the game registration systems that register the game to one individual that also block this right. Many companies claim they do it because the used game market hurts their sales. Whether or not that is true does not justify taking away an individual's rights.

    The only options I can think of that don't interfere with any of these rights are purely disk-check based systems and no DRM at all. The right to modify means people can get around disk-check systems so that option is overall pointless. So having no DRM system in the end is what's best for the consumer.

    Some may argue that having a EULA gives a company the legal right to hinder an individual's ownership rights. However selling a product without first having the user agree to such terms nullifies their legal precedent. Furthermore the laws of the United States and many other nations ensures the individual's rights of ownership regardless of other acts or agreements.

    So in conclusion, DRM only serves to deny an individual their rights of ownership. So it should not be used.

  4. #4

    Default

    Let's try it from the other side, just for fun:

    DRM prevents people from stealing/buying 1 copy of my commercial product, then endlessly duplicating it without any recompense accruing to me; meaning that I can recoup my initial investment or even make a profit

    DRM keeps my project in the form I intended it to be when released; the right to create derivative works is not automatic

    DRM to a degree helps protect my intellectual property; I worked hard on this, and may well have created a unique way to accomplish some task. Why should the public at large be allowed to use it for free?

  5. #5

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by Traemo View Post
    Let's try it from the other side, just for fun:

    DRM prevents people from stealing/buying 1 copy of my commercial product, then endlessly duplicating it without any recompense accruing to me; meaning that I can recoup my initial investment or even make a profit

    DRM keeps my project in the form I intended it to be when released; the right to create derivative works is not automatic

    DRM to a degree helps protect my intellectual property; I worked hard on this, and may well have created a unique way to accomplish some task. Why should the public at large be allowed to use it for free?
    All of that is totally valid. The issue is that DRM seldom does any of that. At best it buys a few weeks before a game is cracked or leaked. Then anyone who wants to pirate the game will, and anyone who wants to buy the game and play it will have a hell of a time. For DRM to be even somewhat effective, it must be invasive. If it's invasive, why would I buy the game?

  6. #6

    Default

    Lets look at a few things related to piracy, which is the main excuse for DRM.

    No matter what someone will find a way to crack the DRM. There was the infamous case of the DRM in Assassin's Creed 2. It required a constant internet connection to play. Within a day a partially working crack was released and in a little over a month a fully functional crack was release that completely bypassed the DRM. Ubisoft's controversial 'always on' PC DRM hacked | Web Crawler - CNET News

    Another issue is that DRM can sometimes encourage piracy. A good example of this is Spore. Its DRM initially only allowed for a total of three activations. Even for the average consumer it is incredibly easy to go through more activations than that. Spore became one of the most pirated games of all time because people did not want such a restriction. Spore DRM could kill PC gaming | ZDNet

    Then there are people in all forms of media who do not see the piracy of their works as inherently evil. Furthermore they see that piracy can get their work to a greater audience. Neil Gaiman, a writer noted for such novels as American Gods and Coraline, has stated that piracy has actually helped his book sales. YouTube - Gaiman on Copyright Piracy and the Web Then there is Norman Howell aka Notch famous for the video game Minecraft who notes that piracy does not result in the lose of actual income, and can at times lead to increased sales. How piracy works. : The Word of Notch

    Publishers may try to use DRM to stop piracy, but it doesn't help them. People will crack the DRM. If the DRM is too restrictive it only encourages more piracy. Finally piracy can actually get a game out to a greater audience and lead to increased sales.

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