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Thread: When did the transition from plastic to clothlike covers occur?

  1. #1

    Default When did the transition from plastic to clothlike covers occur?

    So this question has been sitting in my head, just hanging around and having a good time, for a while now. When exactly did baby diapers start switching over to the clothlike covers? I'm fairly certain that they were still plastic-backed in the early 90s, but between then and maybe around 2008, when I bought a pack and noticed the clothlike covers, is a mystery.

    Bonus points* for anyone who knows when adult diapers with the clothlike backing started showing up, too.




    *Points are worth my gratitude and 1/10,000th of a cent each

  2. #2

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    around 2002, pampers introduce a "flexi diaper" wich had the cloth like backing. They have been making them like that ever since.

  3. #3

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    The last plastic backed Luvs were made in 2000, after that they went to cloth-like. I have no clue on the adult diaper situation but I think it was pretty recent (7 years or so?)

  4. #4

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    The first disposable diaper with a cloth-like cover was Huggies Supreme, introduced in 1994. Pampers Premium, also with a cloth-like cover, were introduced in 1995. I believe Pampers Baby-Dry went cloth-like in 1998. Llamalord is correct, the last Luvs with plastic covers were made in 2000. Hard to believe it's been 11 years since a major US brand produced a diaper with a smooth plastic covers. The cloth-like covers were just so much hype, and consumers fell for it.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by ultrapampers View Post
    The first disposable diaper with a cloth-like cover was Huggies Supreme, introduced in 1994. Pampers Premium, also with a cloth-like cover, were introduced in 1995. I believe Pampers Baby-Dry went cloth-like in 1998. Llamalord is correct, the last Luvs with plastic covers were made in 2000.
    Wow, you know your stuff!

    I just define the period of the transition as when diaper manufacturers all became uncouth heathens. Now they're even taking it further and slowly phasing out briefs from store shelves in favor of pullups. Does their treachery know no bounds?!

    Gosh, I feel like such a luddite for resenting the progress in diaper technology.

  6. #6
    Peachy

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    I've had my first adult diaper with a cloth-like cover in 2000. They were far from perfect, because they felt wet on the outside after the first wetting.

  7. #7

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    So that would mean I was raised in plastic backed diapers. Mhm, I wonder if, in a few years, most members in there late teens will prefer cloth backed diapers... Something to keep an eye out for.


    Sent from my iPhone

  8. #8

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    I bought a bag of Tena Classic Plus from 2002 that was plastic-backed. I'm guessing that 2005 is when the majority of diapers began to be cloth-backed.

  9. #9

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    I believe that some where in the mid to late 1990's and early 2000's most baby diapers switched to the cloth like covers.
    the adult diapers switching to cloth like covers has been maybe in the last 5 years or so.
    I prefer plastic covered diapers my self.

  10. #10
    angelabauer

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by ultrapampers View Post
    Hard to believe it's been 11 years since a major US brand produced a diaper with a smooth plastic covers. The cloth-like covers were just so much hype, and consumers fell for it.
    Okay, I get it, you love the days when baby diapers still used PE based poly-plastic outer covers with sticky tapes, such as Ultra Pampers.

    Let me ask a question: Were you a parent of a child still in diapers before cloth-like seriously began replacing poly-plastic?

    According to the leading business consultants, such as Carlos Richer, and retired disposable diaper executives, KCWW and P&G were dragged into the development of cloth-like because each of their market research departments found solid evidence that enough mothers would pay extra so they could avoid the sensation of poly-plastic on the skin of their arms while carrying a diapered baby or toddler.

    In the years leading up to 1994 there was an increasing demand, as shown in market research, for disposable training pants as well as re-positionable fastening systems. Several of those retired KCCW and P&G executives have told me in those days they cursed the introduction of sticky tapes attached to disposables. To them manufacturing, shipment and storage of disposables was more efficient when the sticky tape was sold separately and thus shipped separately.

    Going back to 1970 when P&G started test marketing factory-installed sticky tapes, there were countless production problems. Finding an adhesive that could release from protective paper and still stick to poly-plastic under all weather conditions was and remains problematic. Another problem then and now is the short storage life of sticky tapes as used on disposables.

    When it became vital to make disposables thinner, compression for packaging became a problem. Even with an all-fluff disposable, over compression causes pin-holes in poly-plastic. Add some dry SAP flakes and those pin-holes multiply. Even in the pioneer days of cloth-like it became obvious there was no danger of hook & loop fastener tabs drying out in storage. The dual layer cloth-like is exponentially more robust in shipping and storage compared to poly-plastic.

    Over the years new cloth-like has been perfected using recycled material for the outer most cloth-like surface.

    Did consumers reject cloth-like to the same extent as the old-school AB/DL community? Maybe P&G and KCCW marketing people are outstanding, but can they actually fool all the people all the time?

    Call it hype as you do, yet without cloth-like there could not be any disposable pull-on or pull-up. There also could be no supple, flexible, stretchy disposable for people, young and old, who actively more while diapered.

    Of course if you do want to start selling baby poly-plastic covered disposables, I am sure Carlos Richer has a slightly used machine available you could buy. Or, he will be glad to broker a deal to have those made for you somewhere and shipped to you, after you pay before production begins.

    It would be up to you to advertise and market those disposables. Then you would need to obtain shelf space in stores.

    If P&G cannot hold shelf space for Cruisers Size 7 and KCCW space for Huggies Overnights Size 6, best of luck as a small new venture.

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