Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15

Thread: Sugar Powered Rockets

  1. #1

    Default Sugar Powered Rockets

    Has anyone ever tried this, I am saving up some cash o buy the materials, but I want to know is anyone else has tried this.
    For those of you that don't know what a sugar rocket is, it is a model rocket engine that is powered by some form of sugar, mixed with an oxidizer such as potsium nitrate (stump remover) which burns like a rocket engine does. A smal engine can launch a rocket over a thousand ft, or so I have been told.

  2. #2

    Default

    Whoa thats awesome but an engine that burns sugar sounds like i would be really hard to clean up and wouldnt smell too good either...have you ever burned sugar it stinks. But 1000 ft thats alot

  3. #3

    Default

    1000 ft has been done, except you need to get into rocket science to do it. Potassium nitrate + sugar is only part of the rocket, you need a rocket body, nozzle, head, etc. all properly built in order to get it anywhere and then some for details. Too much pressure causes it to explode, too little won't launch it very high. Then there's also what you build it out of, at that point it's more effort than it's worth.

    Smaller rockets however are usually easy to build, I'd love to experiment sometime with making effective smaller rockets. They won't that far, but they're fun none the less.

  4. #4

    Default

    I've made the stuff before, it's pretty neat, but the mixture's a bit tricky if you want a rocket engine rather than a smoke bomb. The best way to shape the actual engines is to melt the sugar and pour the oxidizer into it, then pour the mixture into some kind of mold or casing.

  5. #5

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by oblivionxi1 View Post
    1000 ft has been done, except you need to get into rocket science to do it. Potassium nitrate + sugar is only part of the rocket, you need a rocket body, nozzle, head, etc. all properly built in order to get it anywhere and then some for details. Too much pressure causes it to explode, too little won't launch it very high. Then there's also what you build it out of, at that point it's more effort than it's worth.

    Smaller rockets however are usually easy to build, I'd love to experiment sometime with making effective smaller rockets. They won't that far, but they're fun none the less.
    I have some carbon fibre nozzles i made using a mold, and as for the calculations, they are pretty much solid, with a 5/16 inch nozzle aft from a 9.4 inch fore with an inch of sloping parablically, it will supposudly give me about 750 lbs. of thrust with only 4 grams of fuel.


    As Komodo said


    I've made the stuff before, it's pretty neat, but the mixture's a bit tricky if you want a rocket engine rather than a smoke bomb. The best way to shape the actual engines is to melt the sugar and pour the oxidizer into it, then pour the mixture into some kind of mold or casing.
    I actually am using plain sugar, with a small amount of molases in the sugar to mix everything and prevent cracking in the granulated form, shaped using a carbon fiber engine tube that is about the size on an Estes E9-8.
    I also have the correct ratio of about 60% potasium nitrate to 40% sugar/mollases by weight.

    ---------- Post added at 23:16 ---------- Previous post was at 23:14 ----------



    Quote Originally Posted by Dlbraden View Post
    Whoa thats awesome but an engine that burns sugar sounds like i would be really hard to clean up and wouldnt smell too good either...have you ever burned sugar it stinks. But 1000 ft thats alot
    No mess, as the sugar is turned rapidly into carbon dioxide gas, which is absorbed into the atmosphere, also, the sugar wont smell worse than a standard engine, it will be burned and gone before it has time to create lingering odors.

  6. #6

    Default

    Never heard of this before, but it's an interesting concept. I did a lot of rocketry when I was a kid. Fun stuff.
    I just checked through some YouTube vids and this one seemed like the most legit demo of a fully made rocket:
    YouTube - Tutorial Homemade Rocket (sugar KNO3) + Launch

    But what I don't get is why you'd go through all that trouble when model rocket engines are so cheap and readily available. Just for the heck of it, I'm guessing?

  7. #7
    Falkio

    Default

    I was going to make an M203 for a custom airgun I have with smoke charges using rocket engines of these kind, but never actually finished it. I had a circuit worked out using alligator clamps and a temp switch to ignite them. You just need Potassium Nitrate (KNO3), sugar, kitty litter, PVC piping, a hammer, a drill, and something to pack it with. For a tip, I've thought about using corks to make the rockets more aerodynamic. In the end, they're kind of cool for messing around with, but not much else. I suppose you can mass produce them and save on commercial rocket engines from hobby stores.

    But other than a few seconds of shock value, they're not useful for anything else. :p

  8. #8

    Default

    We had a student that graduated a few years before me build a KNO3+Sugar rocket for his senior project. Unfortunately we were never allowed to launch it because of the danger from it exploding and FAA issues. I agree with above that the best way to make the mix would be to melt down the sugar and pour in the oxidizer you just need to make sure that your being really careful and not doing it in your basement. If you really want to get into it I suggest going to the library and reading up on rocketry, I know I also found some helpful info in pyrotechnic books. Oh and watch the movie October Sky again and again and again and again because its just a really good movie!

  9. #9

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by slim View Post
    Never heard of this before, but it's an interesting concept. I did a lot of rocketry when I was a kid. Fun stuff.
    I just checked through some YouTube vids and this one seemed like the most legit demo of a fully made rocket:
    YouTube - Tutorial Homemade Rocket (sugar KNO3) + Launch

    But what I don't get is why you'd go through all that trouble when model rocket engines are so cheap and readily available. Just for the heck of it, I'm guessing?
    Actually, for some extra credit in my technology class. Every quarter the class is given an oppritunity to get some extra credit, and I do it just because it allows me to do crazy shit like this, so also for the helluvit, but also for the extra credit. This quarter's oppritunity was on alternative fuels, and sugar powered rockets came to me while watching an eppisode of it's effin' science where they launched a porta-potty using sugar and potassium nitrate. I have launched an E engine rocket just to get a motor tube, and I am going to actually cook my fuel like komodo suggested to make it a bit easier. As for the nozzle, it wasn't vaporized by the engine, so that is taken care of. Also, the price for the materials to make it is actually cheaper for 20 engines, than it is for a pack of E engines.

    I did a test of a mini engine packed with it, and got the impulse of a B engine from estes. That is twice as powerful as the normal Mini engines.
    I save a ton of cash by doing this, and could sell them myself.
    Ignition is achieved with a small amount of black powder at the base of the engine, with a standard estes igniter for igniting the black powder.

  10. #10

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by maccracker18 View Post
    I agree with above that the best way to make the mix would be to melt down the sugar and pour in the oxidizer you just need to make sure that your being really careful and not doing it in your basement.
    So funny story... Well not really. I'm just glad I have fire extinguishers in my garage. If you're going to do this, please take safety precautions.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 17-Feb-2011, 14:28

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
ADISC.org - the Adult Baby / Diaper Lover / Incontinence Support Community.
ADISC.org is designed to be viewed in Firefox, with a resolution of at least 1280 x 1024.