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Thread: Late News Report: Japan hit by 8.9 Magnitude Earth Quake off the coast

  1. #1

    Default Late News Report: Japan hit by 8.9 Magnitude Earth Quake off the coast

    CNN Reports:



    "Japanese police say 200 to 300 bodies have been found in a northeastern coastal area where a massive earthquake spawned a ferocious tsunami Friday that swept away boats, cars and homes.

    The magnitude 8.9 offshore quake -- the largest in Japan's history -- unleashed a 23-foot (7-meter) tsunami and was followed by more than 50 aftershocks for hours, many of them of more than magnitude 6.0.

    The bodies found were in Sendai city, the closest major city to the epicenter, Japanese police said. Earlier, police confirmed at least 60 people had been killed and 56 were missing. The death toll was likely to continue climbing given the scale of Friday's disaster.

    Tsunami waves generated by the massive quake hit Hawaii early Friday morning. The first waves crashed into the island of Kauai at 3:13 a.m. local time. Officials predicted they would experience waves up to 6 feet (2 meters).

    Alaska Emergency Management also reported a 5.1-foot wave at Shemya, 1.5-foot at Adak, and 1.6-foot at Dutch Harbor in the Aleutian Islands. Shemya is 1,200 miles southwest of Anchorage.



    Emergency Management Specialist David Lee at Fort Richardson said there are no reports of damage and no significant damage expected on the coast of Alaska, although that could still depend on the surge in different areas.

    The Alaska Tsunami Warning Center issued a tsunami warning for the coastal areas of Alaska from Attu to Amchitka Pass in the Aleutians and an advisory from Amchitka Pass along the West Coast to Oregon.

    The U.S. Geological Survey said the 2:46 p.m. quake was a magnitude 8.9, the biggest earthquake to hit Japan since officials began keeping records in the late 1800s, and one of the biggest ever recorded in the world.

    The quake struck at a depth of six miles (10 kilometers), about 80 miles (125 kilometers) off the eastern coast, the agency said. The area is 240 miles (380 kilometers) northeast of Tokyo.

    The Japanese government ordered thousands of residents near a nuclear power plant in Onahama city to evacuate because the plant's system was unable to cool the reactor. The reactor was not leaking radiation but its core remained hot even after a shutdown. The plant is 170 miles (270 kilometers) northeast of Tokyo.

    Dozens of cities and villages along a 1,300-mile (2,100-kilometer) stretch of coastline were shaken by violent tremors that reached as far away as Tokyo, hundreds of miles (kilometers) from the epicenter.

    "The earthquake has caused major damage in broad areas in northern Japan," Prime Minister Naoto Kan said at a news conference.

    Trouble was reported at two other nuclear plants as well, but there was no radiation leak at any.

    Even for a country used to earthquakes, this one was of horrific proportions because of the tsunami that crashed ashore, swallowing everything in its path as it surged several miles (kilometers) inland before retreating. The apocalyptic images of surging water broadcast by Japanese TV networks resembled scenes from a Hollywood disaster movie.

    Large fishing boats and other sea vessels rode high waves into the cities, slamming against overpasses or scraping under them and snapping power lines along the way. Upturned and partially submerged vehicles were seen bobbing in the water. Ships anchored in ports crashed against each other.

    The highways to the worst-hit coastal areas were severely damaged and communications, including telephone lines, were snapped. Train services in northeastern Japan and in Tokyo, which normally serve 10 million people a day, were also suspended, leaving untold numbers stranded in stations or roaming the streets. Tokyo's Narita airport was closed indefinitely.

    Jesse Johnson, a native of the U.S. state of Nevada, who lives in Chiba, north of Tokyo, was eating at a sushi restaurant with his wife when the quake hit.

    "At first it didn't feel unusual, but then it went on and on. So I got myself and my wife under the table," he told The Associated Press. "I've lived in Japan for 10 years and I've never felt anything like this before. The aftershocks keep coming. It's gotten to the point where I don't know whether it's me shaking or an earthquake."

    Waves of muddy waters flowed over farmland near the city of Sendai, carrying buildings, some on fire, inland as cars attempted to drive away. Sendai airport, north of Tokyo, was inundated with cars, trucks, buses and thick mud deposited over its runways. Fires spread through a section of the city, public broadcaster NHK reported.

    More than 300 houses were washed away in Ofunato City alone. Television footage showed mangled debris, uprooted trees, upturned cars and shattered timber littering streets.

    The tsunami roared over embankments, washing anything in its path inland before reversing directions and carrying the cars, homes and other debris out to sea. Flames shot from some of the houses, probably because of burst gas pipes.

    "Our initial assessment indicates that there has already been enormous damage," Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano said. "We will make maximum relief effort based on that assessment."

    He said the Defense Ministry was sending troops to the quake-hit region. A utility aircraft and several helicopters were on the way.

    A large fire erupted at the Cosmo oil refinery in Ichihara city in Chiba prefecture and burned out of control with 100-foot (30 meter) -high flames whipping into the sky.

    From northeastern Japan's Miyagi prefecture, NHK showed footage of a large ship being swept away and ramming directly into a breakwater in Kesennuma city.

    NHK said more than 4 million buildings were without power in Tokyo and its suburbs.

    Also in Miyagi, a fire broke out in a turbine building of a nuclear power plant, but it was later extinguished, said Tohoku Electric Power Co. the company said.

    A reactor area of a nearby plant was leaking water, the company said. But it was unclear if the leak was caused by tsunami water or something else. There were no reports of radioactive leaks at any of Japan's nuclear plants.
    Jefferies International Limited, a global investment banking group, said it estimated overall losses to be about $10 billion.

    A tsunami warning was extended to a number of Pacific, Southeast Asian and Latin American nations, including Japan, Russia, Indonesia, New Zealand and Chile. In the Philippines, authorities ordered an evacuation of coastal communities, but no unusual waves were reported.

    Thousands of people fled their homes in Indonesia after officials warned of a tsunami up to 6 feet (2 meters) high. But waves of only 4 inches (10 centimeters) were measured. No big waves came to the Northern Mariana Islands, a U.S. territory, either.

    In downtown Tokyo, large buildings shook violently and workers poured into the street for safety. TV footage showed a large building on fire and bellowing smoke in the Odaiba district of Tokyo. The tremor bent the upper tip of the iconic Tokyo Tower, a 1,093-foot (333-meter) steel structure inspired by the Eiffel Tower in Paris.

    Footage on NHK from their Sendai office showed employees stumbling around and books and papers crashing from desks. It also showed a glass shelter at a bus stop in Tokyo completely smashed by the quake and a weeping woman nearby being comforted by another woman.

    Several quakes had hit the same region in recent days, including a 7.3 magnitude one on Wednesday that caused no damage.

    Hiroshi Sato, a disaster management official in northern Iwate prefecture, said officials were having trouble getting an overall picture of the destruction.

    "We don't even know the extent of damage. Roads were badly damaged and cut off as tsunami washed away debris, cars and many other things," he said.

    Dozens of fires were reported in northern prefectures of Fukushima, Sendai, Iwate and Ibaraki. Collapsed homes and landslides were also reported in Miyagi.

    Japan's worst previous quake was in 1923 in Kanto, an 8.3-magnitude temblor that killed 143,000 people, according to USGS. A 7.2-magnitude quake in Kobe city in 1996 killed 6,400 people.

    Japan lies on the "Ring of Fire" -- an arc of earthquake and volcanic zones stretching around the Pacific where about 90 percent of the world's quakes occur, including the one that triggered the Dec. 26, 2004, Indian Ocean tsunami that killed an estimated 230,000 people in 12 nations. A magnitude-8.8 temblor that shook central Chile last February also generated a tsunami and killed 524 people."



    http://a57.foxnews.com/static/managed/img/Scitech/660/371/Japanquake1.jpg



    http://a57.foxnews.com/static/managed/img/Scitech/660/371/Japanquake2.jpg




    http://a57.foxnews.com/static/managed/img/Scitech/660/371/Japanquake3.jpg




    Source of the pictures are from fox news



    My condolences go out to friends and families in Japan, my condolences go out to those that're writers (mangaka) or do other jobs and work and home that, live in that area and lost their lively hood in the tsunami/ earth quake.

    The death toll is up to 200-300 and rising. Lets hope our Japanese friend/ brotheren ( Those that're Otaku in the states, should feel the same) are all safe and Okay.


    Those that live in Japan right now and visit this site, I want to here your experience from this Earth Quake/ Tsunami.


    I am very up set about this, and was hurting for those that lost their lives in the tsunami or died in the earth quake.


    Again, I feel for those in Japan right now. ( But this is rare. Just like Japan's crime rate, these things rarely happen. Though, when the one of these things hits, it hits hard.


    This shouldn't turn those off from wanting to live in Japan..)



    Discuss.

  2. #2

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    I have been watching this for the past 12 hours off and on when I can't sleep. I just can't get over the sheer size of the whole thing and scope of the quake. Wow... I just can't get over everything I am seeing from NHK in Japan and on CNN.

    When I woke up at 3am and turned my TV on, I could not believe it... my thoughts are with the Japanese people and I hope they rebuild. I have a lot of admiration for Japan and Japan is a country I want to visit.

    WildThing121675

  3. #3

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    At one time, there were reports of up to 88,000 (not a typo, eighty-eight thousand) people missing. I hope they revised that number dramatically down.

  4. #4

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    im scared now for the risk of nuclear meltdown

    i know they are sending coolants from the USA and such, and flying in generators to help repower the reactors to get the coolant system flowing.


    im gonna point out that as a greeie its THESE events that worry us, we know that about 99% of the time theyre safe, but if we get that 1% shit hoits the fan in a way that is uncomparable.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by silent deadly alchemist View Post
    im scared now for the risk of nuclear meltdown
    i'd say that that's the least of anybody's worries as the whole plant can be easily quenched with sea water.
    more worrisome is the question of how much sea water was subducted during the uplift? it's got to come out somewhere, sometime.

    my condolences to all those affected.

  6. #6

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    They've upgraded this to a 9.1 magnitude quake.

    As this is using the Magnitude, rather than the Richter, Scale, I understand it's equivalent to 9.6 on the Richter Scale. These are non-linear scales, too, which means that a 7 is 10x more powerful than a 6, and a 9 is 10x more powerful than an 8.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by h3g3l View Post
    They've upgraded this to a 9.1 magnitude quake.

    As this is using the Magnitude, rather than the Richter, Scale, I understand it's equivalent to 9.6 on the Richter Scale. These are non-linear scales, too, which means that a 7 is 10x more powerful than a 6, and a 9 is 10x more powerful than an 8.
    Many scales are non-linear, but don't go ten times up each time. It's a logarithmic scale, to be specific.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by ade View Post
    i'd say that that's the least of anybody's worries as the whole plant can be easily quenched with sea water.
    more worrisome is the question of how much sea water was subducted during the uplift? it's got to come out somewhere, sometime.

    my condolences to all those affected.
    If this were true, then it wouldn't be the massive big deal that everyone is making about it. It's not true because nuclear power plants simply aren't designed that way.

    A nuclear power plant's core is extremely hot, and must constantly be water cooled even after it's been "shut off" by dropping control rods into the core to slow the fission reaction. If the core evaporates all of the water in the cooling system because it has failed to continue circulating, the core then begins to melt itself and the entire apparatus around it; a "meltdown" is quite literal in meaning. The entire reactor is then enclosed on all sides by a large barrier of cement lined with materials to absorb radiation. Since there's so much stuff built around the core, you can't just simply press a button and drop it into the water, which even if you could would release a massive amount of radioactivity into the environment and thereby missing the point, so you cannot simply quench it as you claim. Simply filling the building surrounding the reactor isn't enough - it needs a continuous supply of cold water.


    To run the water cooling system, you need electricity. Due to power outages caused by the earthquake, the electric grid was knocked out. The on-site backup diesel generators were knocked out an hour later by the tsunami. Now, they're left with battery backup, which doesn't last long and has quickly proven insufficient. They're doing controlled venting of some of the radioactivity, which is something you only do if you think that a meltdown and a corresponding uncontrolled release is inevitable short of extreme measures.
    Last edited by Fruitkitty; 13-Mar-2011 at 05:51.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zephiel View Post
    Many scales are non-linear, but don't go ten times up each time. It's a logarithmic scale, to be specific.
    Correct.

    It's a base-10 logarithmic scale.

  10. #10

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    man i have been hearing about this... i really do feel for them...

    but you know? it irks me how you said this

    My condolences go out to friends and families in Japan, my condolences go out to those that're writers (mangaka) or do other jobs and work and home that, live in that area and lost their lively hood in the tsunami/ earth quake.

    it seemed to me that the mangaka are first on your mind... and then comes the others. thats what bugs me about any natural disaster... it seems people think "oh well its a horrble thing and all... but just so long as no one i care about is hurt even if i don't know them, i will still feel for the people i don't know... but not as much"

    im not saying you think this... but thats how it sounded to me

    i'm sorry for being arguementitive but that really had to come off my chest... (i think it comes from the news and media having a mentality of "afghan children orphaned because of our war? naw they can't relate to that... hey! i know lets run more crap about charlie sheen!" although this is completely different from the earthquake i just wanted to point out where my thinking stems from)

    and honestly although im being arguementitive, lets not argue this one... lets just morn all lost life without pioritizing one over the other (again not saying anyone here has or is doing this i am just blowing off steam)

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