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Thread: howards 3 magnets (and other urban sprawl issues)

  1. #1

    Default howards 3 magnets (and other urban sprawl issues)

    in preperation for big exams on the subject of sustainable urban development and design (SUDD for short) and since its a friday night and i dont feel like doing much,
    in your area do you think you have a good layout? if so, in what way, are you on a culdesac system? or a grid system, are you living in a really old city like those in austria, london paris and amsterdam, one with historic buildings, are you in a obscure country town noones ever even thought possibly existed.?

    how dense is the area, whats the lanscape.

    im just collecting thoughts as a form of 'study'

    old members i.e those with ages over 30 id be interested to hear your insight as to how your areas have changed over the decades.

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    I live in an old, small city with sprawling suburban areas immediately attached adjacent to the city. Lynchburg was established in the 1700s as we are on the historic James River, James River colony being one of the first outposts in the new Americas. Because we are situated in the foothills of the Shenandoah Mountains, almost none of the roads in the suburban areas connect and continue through, so if you want to ride a bicycle, you will have to ride on a more major road with lots of traffic to get to where you're going.

    One road which connects to the road on which I live is so winding that they say a drunken cow laid it out. Lynchburg is also a Civil War town and the Battle of Lynchburg was fought down my street with troops on that winding road. The city is on a grid plan, and those roads connect, but the rest of the town is crazy. We also have a number of creeks and streams running through the town, and that must have posed a problem for the original founders and planners. The railroad played heavily into the history of the town. The rail lines run parallel downtown to the James River, so turning that area into something more resort like, with boats and docks is out of the question as the CXS line is still active. At one time, the rail lines ran right down the streets in the down town area, carry passengers and freight. That is no longer the case.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by dogboy View Post
    I live in an old, small city with sprawling suburban areas immediately attached adjacent to the city. Lynchburg was established in the 1700s as we are on the historic James River, James River colony being one of the first outposts in the new Americas. Because we are situated in the foothills of the Shenandoah Mountains, almost none of the roads in the suburban areas connect and continue through, so if you want to ride a bicycle, you will have to ride on a more major road with lots of traffic to get to where you're going.

    One road which connects to the road on which I live is so winding that they say a drunken cow laid it out. Lynchburg is also a Civil War town and the Battle of Lynchburg was fought down my street with troops on that winding road. The city is on a grid plan, and those roads connect, but the rest of the town is crazy. We also have a number of creeks and streams running through the town, and that must have posed a problem for the original founders and planners. The railroad played heavily into the history of the town. The rail lines run parallel downtown to the James River, so turning that area into something more resort like, with boats and docks is out of the question as the CXS line is still active. At one time, the rail lines ran right down the streets in the down town area, carry passengers and freight. That is no longer the case.
    looking at the place from google earth,its very interesting to see how the density of development dramatically drops (alliteration ) outside the historic city centre. its a very dry place is it? the soil in the suburban areas sems to betray that idea, its interesting that it goes from municiple centre. then semi-low densty housing in grid, then out west i think its the culdesac/ node style residential development.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by silent deadly alchemist View Post
    looking at the place from google earth,its very interesting to see how the density of development dramatically drops (alliteration ) outside the historic city centre. its a very dry place is it? the soil in the suburban areas sems to betray that idea, its interesting that it goes from municiple centre. then semi-low densty housing in grid, then out west i think its the culdesac/ node style residential development.
    I'm glad you Google Earthed Lynchburg as I was going to suggest that. Yes, because of the cul de sac style, you can't ride the grid on a bike and avoid traffic like I could when I lived in Cuyahoga Falls,Ohio. We have a lot of dry periods and it was a dry summer. Part of the reason is that the weather fronts predominantly come West to East, and when the fronts cross the mountains they lift up and often are split circumventing Lynchburg.

    We have a lot of trees and that's one reason why I like riding the bike trail. I'm surrounded by trees on the bike path. I suppose you also noticed the rail lines down town running along the river. They had to find the flattest topography so the river bed was a first consideration. The line used to run up 12th St. but that had a big hill and that line was abandoned in 1905 and redirected to where the bike path is.

    In the 1800s, they had packet boats that transported goods up and down the James river. They dug a canal so they could go into the city. Lynchburg was a hub city for the transportation of tobacco and some of the residents became very wealthy, which is why downtown has a number of large Victorian houses, some of them with ballrooms. The old Paramount Theater has been restored, and at one time, Caruso sang there. Now imagine this thriving city supplied with the labor of slaves. We had an article in our newspaper explaining how the slaves were brought into the city at night, so the "ladies" of Lynchburg wouldn't be disturbed by the side of all these black men and women being transported in chains. Sad, isn't it.

  5. #5

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    i live in auburn washington state which dates back to late 1800's. historically auburn was a railroad and farming town with a history of flooding before the dam was built in the 60's a majority of auburn was built pre 1980's with lots of housing development(high end and high density) in the hills(west hill lea hill and lakeland hills) these are the mega sized master planned cookie cutter houses with a foot of space in between each other and all the same and rich folks pay good money for them) auburn also happens to sit on a couple major free ways built some time ago. other interesting facts.....major battles with indians were faught here with settlers gaining the town the early name of slaughter. gov christine gregoire is from auburn. auburn has the lowest per capita income and higest incidents of poverty in king county which is the biggest county in the state but we arent a ghetto town just lots of working poor and immigrants mixed in with lots of old people on social security.....all the wealthy live on the hills looking down on the rest of us....what a surprise...we do have plenty of historic buildings the original still working rail road system.....we are spread out with equal amounts of apartments and other multi family housing and single family homes. on the hills is more set up for high density close together housing and is zoned for commercial and residential...the rest of auburn is mostly residential with pockets of commercial(downtown) and an industrial with a stretch of farming. lastly auburn has 65,000 people 13th largest city in the state and roughly 30 sq miles.http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/4c/Downtown_auburn.jpg/420px-Downtown_auburn.jpg

    info on auburnAuburn, Washington - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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