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Thread: Fortified WIne

  1. #1

    Default Fortified WIne

    Hi all,

    Was wondering if anyone else is a fan of fortified wines?

    I have no idea what it's like in the US, UK (or pretty much anywhere else) but in Australia most bottle shops have a woefully small section of fortifieds even though we have this magnificent country town called Rutherglen that make (in my opinion) the best drink in the world... namely Rutherglen Muscat (Brown Muscat.)

    I have sampled many other fortifieds such as Australian Tawnies (modeled after Tawny Ports) genuine Ports/Oportos both vintage and tawny, Pedro Ximenez & Moscatel sherry, Frontignac (white muscat,) Muscadelle (once called Tokay in Australia,) Marsala, some fortified ice-wine and others I have no idea what style they are supposed to be (not that I want to box them into a style necessarily.)

    I find though that I have never had a genuine Madeira (you know from Madeira,) a proper royal Hungarian Tokaji or ever found a US Muscadine.

    Not all fortifieds are bum wines!

  2. #2

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    Here in the UK we have a rather extensive range of ports sherrys madeira, as we import from all the countries in Europe that make it. Now that it is coming into winter i will certainly be having one or two little tasters of whats on offer. Genuine Madeira is really good. Expensive but good.

  3. #3

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    I hear Portugal is the place to go. Anyway what is wrong with Penfold's Invalid Port? I beleive there is a white tawny port though I have never seen a bottle mostly as I rarely drink. But at one stage I used to love a good tawny.

  4. #4

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    In my limited understanding of history I am given to guessing that it is thanks to the UK the fortified revolution began! Glad to know it is still part of the scene, on that note I have also been lucky enough to track down an Australian produced "Elderberry Port" which also had it's origins in the UK.

    Would love to go to Portugal and Spain for a tour around the wineries (though I think I would blow our budget to pieces with 2 bottles here 1 carton there.)

    One of my earliest memories is actually of my parents wine rack with bottle after bottle of "Penfold's Port" grey labeled bottles and the smell of a winery with a fortified offering (mmm that smell today makes me feel at home.)

    I was a bit dubious on white fortifieds for sometime as they appeared to my limited palate to be quite simple but after expanding my horizons I find I now want another barrel (already have a muscat and "port" barrel) to blend up the best of the white fortifieds I have tried Frontignac, Chardonnay liquor, Muscat of Alexandria, Verdehlo and maybe if I don't just drink it all down some more Pedro Ximenez.

  5. #5

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    Odd, in the US, when most people talk about "fortified wine", they are referring to the likes of Thunderbird or MD 20/20.

    Glad to see this thread has nothing to do with that.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Choos View Post
    I find though that I have never had a genuine Madeira (you know from Madeira,) a proper royal Hungarian Tokaji or ever found a US Muscadine.
    See if you can track down a variety of wine (variously classified red) called Scupperdine. It's made from scupperdine grapes. It's not a fortified wine, but it has an extremely woody quality to it that reminds me of a muscadine. It's delicious. I literally feel like I'm drinking a tree.

    Check out this (http://wifeofafabredneck.blogspot.co...upperdine.html), the woman writing it is actually reviewing the same bottle of wine I have- I even bought mine at Childress Vineyards. It's a bit of a wonky article but has some good info in it.

    ---------- Post added at 03:50 AM ---------- Previous post was at 03:43 AM ----------



    Quote Originally Posted by Choos View Post
    I have no idea what it's like in the US, UK (or pretty much anywhere else) but in Australia most bottle shops have a woefully small section of fortifieds even though we have this magnificent country town called Rutherglen that make (in my opinion) the best drink in the world... namely Rutherglen Muscat (Brown Muscat.)
    Depends on the liquor store. Most neighborhood liquor stores have roughly the same selection of poisons for hard liquor and will vary the wine selection- though the selection starts thinning out when you get to bottles over $20. There's usually a small selection of fortified wines as Americans often use them in cooking. You can count on finding a few more expensive port wines, and a limited selection (as in, a dry and a sweet) for other fortified wines.

    Of course, if you go to a gourmet liquor store or one which focuses on its wine menu, the selection will increase markedly.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by KaworuVsDrWily View Post
    Odd, in the US, when most people talk about "fortified wine", they are referring to the likes of Thunderbird or MD 20/20.

    Glad to see this thread has nothing to do with that.
    Bum wines ha!

    Australia has kinda had that thing going on as well giving fortifieds a bad name but to my knowledge we have never had songs written about our cheap way to a hangover!

    Thanks NightFox will have an ask about Scupperdine at some of the bigger stores!

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