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Thread: Clothing Help?

  1. #1

    Default Clothing Help?

    I'm looking for ideas on a certain look at an inexpensive price, but am terrible at making outfits.
    Here's what I'm looking for as the base:
    Long striped socks, light colored.
    Either a pleated skirt or denim dress/jumper.

    I am a male, looking for an outfit suitable for a 4-6 year old girl. I have around a 30" waist, which I believe makes me around a size 16?

    Any suggestions for a cute, matching look, or places to buy online, would be greatly appreciated.

  2. #2

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    Thrift stores. A lot of them will be empty too, and the owners don't care why you're buying.

    Good prices and you can get some good stuff if you look hard.

    Also, the tweener section of the local kohl's / jc penneys / fill in the blank here / all have childish looking stuff in their stores. Sometimes on deep discount!

  3. #3

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    size 16 in womens? You are nowhere near a 16. you would be a catalog 6-8. If you are talking girls then you really need to look at more than just the waist, and you are most likely a 16+.

  4. #4

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    I was just guessing on sizes. I have a junior's skirt that's a size 16 and fits pretty well, but I also know that sizing differs brand to brand. Mainly I'm looking for a good outfit combo, though. I suck at matching and all that jazz.

  5. #5

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    Have to agree with Loki. Thrift stores are a goldmine for... well every odd ball thing imaginable. As long as you don't mind buying secondhand, that is.

  6. #6

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    I keep meaning to go to thrift stores (charity shops) for overalls (to make into shortalls) and stuff like that, I need to find some work clothes too (im not paying 7 for some tracksuit bottoms that are gonna get ruined at work!!)

  7. #7

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    Hit like target/walmart they have some weird stuff in there sometimes that can work out solid!

  8. #8

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    initially, and since you've got internet, i'd advise mooching around some of the retro/vintage clothing sites just to get an idea of what you're looking for (it'll save you bundles in cash and effort); you'll also find patterns to inspire you. and as others said, thrift stores and charity shops will give best value, though you're limited to whatever stock they have in at the time.
    sizing is more of a problem simply because the femsters have different bodyshapes and if you're going for the childlike look, you'll need to think along the lines of a straighter frame than the adult male or female. so, sometimes going a big baggier than normal will help hide your bodyshape and, if you're willing to engineer the garments, you can do so to emphasise or disguise the elements of your shape as your prefer.
    another issue, one which is usually not thought about, is that of the weights and stiffness of the fabric. children wear the same weight and thickness fabric as adults, so the garments then hang, move and feel differently on a child's frame than that of an adult. it can be a catch-22 with regards to the weight and stiffness but there are quick-fixes to this problem: fabric stiffener (basically, sheets of wundaweb/hemming web, which you iron on - just cut to the shapes of the garment's segments) and the many types of synthetic fleeces and linings which can be either glued or sewn in place. there's loads of stuff to choose from, to inspire, to waste loads of time shopping and to spend your money on. though most stuff is available from your local haberdasher or home furnisher, it's often the case that the requirements of industry result in various businesses casually disposing of the same or better materials, so keeping an eye out for such stuff is always good (i've had several king-size sheets of memory foam that way, and you've seen the rrp of that stuff!? i've got loads of other materials, too, which i just haven't got round to using; apart from some foam rubber sheets which i eventually cut to fit the boot of my car as an anti-slip matting, instead of it becoming a superheor costume as orginally intended - works brilliantly in the boot!).
    while any old fabric will do for making clothes, it's advisable to have a close inspection of any similar garments you intend to make; this is to get an idea of how clothes are constructed, and you can also use them as templates for your own designs. if you're machine-sewing, it's important to note that there are a few differences to the method of construction than with hand-sewing, but it's no big deal to mix the types of sewing - even the pros often finish off garments with a bit of strategic hand-sewing.

    it's just a guess but, you'll be taking photos or vids of your results, for mementoes? best tip i've got, if you're not already familiar with self-piccing, is lighting, lighting, lighting......and pose, of course. that makes the difference between being happy with yourself and what you've done or feeling like a total twerp.
    so, be it the garment or the memento, don't be put off if it's not as good as you thought or hoped; odds are that the thought and the hope you had were drawn from memories of the briefest of moments and over-idealized in your mind. it's fun to try to capture or reconstruct those moments, though.

    i've probably forgot loads of stuff and i'm certainly no expert. have fun.

  9. #9

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by ade View Post
    initially, and since you've got internet, i'd advise mooching around some of the retro/vintage clothing sites just to get an idea of what you're looking for (it'll save you bundles in cash and effort); you'll also find patterns to inspire you. and as others said, thrift stores and charity shops will give best value, though you're limited to whatever stock they have in at the time.
    sizing is more of a problem simply because the femsters have different bodyshapes and if you're going for the childlike look, you'll need to think along the lines of a straighter frame than the adult male or female. so, sometimes going a big baggier than normal will help hide your bodyshape and, if you're willing to engineer the garments, you can do so to emphasise or disguise the elements of your shape as your prefer.
    another issue, one which is usually not thought about, is that of the weights and stiffness of the fabric. children wear the same weight and thickness fabric as adults, so the garments then hang, move and feel differently on a child's frame than that of an adult. it can be a catch-22 with regards to the weight and stiffness but there are quick-fixes to this problem: fabric stiffener (basically, sheets of wundaweb/hemming web, which you iron on - just cut to the shapes of the garment's segments) and the many types of synthetic fleeces and linings which can be either glued or sewn in place. there's loads of stuff to choose from, to inspire, to waste loads of time shopping and to spend your money on. though most stuff is available from your local haberdasher or home furnisher, it's often the case that the requirements of industry result in various businesses casually disposing of the same or better materials, so keeping an eye out for such stuff is always good (i've had several king-size sheets of memory foam that way, and you've seen the rrp of that stuff!? i've got loads of other materials, too, which i just haven't got round to using; apart from some foam rubber sheets which i eventually cut to fit the boot of my car as an anti-slip matting, instead of it becoming a superheor costume as orginally intended - works brilliantly in the boot!).
    while any old fabric will do for making clothes, it's advisable to have a close inspection of any similar garments you intend to make; this is to get an idea of how clothes are constructed, and you can also use them as templates for your own designs. if you're machine-sewing, it's important to note that there are a few differences to the method of construction than with hand-sewing, but it's no big deal to mix the types of sewing - even the pros often finish off garments with a bit of strategic hand-sewing.

    it's just a guess but, you'll be taking photos or vids of your results, for mementoes? best tip i've got, if you're not already familiar with self-piccing, is lighting, lighting, lighting......and pose, of course. that makes the difference between being happy with yourself and what you've done or feeling like a total twerp.
    so, be it the garment or the memento, don't be put off if it's not as good as you thought or hoped; odds are that the thought and the hope you had were drawn from memories of the briefest of moments and over-idealized in your mind. it's fun to try to capture or reconstruct those moments, though.

    i've probably forgot loads of stuff and i'm certainly no expert. have fun.
    Thanks. Lots of good advice.

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