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Thread: i tell you, this article has 'irony' written all over it

  1. #1

    Default i tell you, this article has 'irony' written all over it

    Woman asks to wear burqa in witness box - Yahoo!7

    lonsg story short shes a muslim momen in a fraud case who, doesnt wish to have her face seen by men and wantsto wear her burqua to court while in the witness box.

    heres the irony, a women, part of a FRAUD case, wants to wear a face covering veil...

    she wins a bronze medal in idiocy for thinking people will go with it, whether her convictions are real or not (they may be, or she might be pulling our leg from perth to sydney)

  2. #2

  3. #3
    Butterfly Mage

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    It reminds me of that case in Florida where a Muslim woman wanted her *Driving License* taken with her face 100% veiled. Yeah, that would really work well as a photo-ID.

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  5. #5
    acorn

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    Quote Originally Posted by Raccoon View Post
    Any cross-dressers out there who wear the burqa?
    Naw! Not into cross-dressing.

    Interesting idea though, might address a personal aesthetic issue. Perhaps you can advise as to whether or not, I’ll still be able to wear my motorbike helmet?

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by acorn View Post
    Interesting idea though, might address a personal aesthetic issue. Perhaps you can advise as to whether or not, I’ll still be able to wear my motorbike helmet?
    There's a difference between aesthetic and religious reasons.

    Also, all the hateful comments on the article are ticking me off. Sometimes, I don't agree with Islam law, but I give it as much respect as possible in today's world. We need to take her needs into consideration, but she should also know that there are times when the Hijab would be more suitable than the Burqa.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shukkume View Post
    There's a difference between aesthetic and religious reasons.

    Also, all the hateful comments on the article are ticking me off. Sometimes, I don't agree with Islam law, but I give it as much respect as possible in today's world. We need to take her needs into consideration, but she should also know that there are times when the Hijab would be more suitable than the Burqa.
    Thank God! Someone with sensibility and cultural respect. Digging through the comments on that article, it seems like most people lack those qualities.

  8. #8
    acorn

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    We did refrain from commenting directly on the case itself, this was something to do with not pre-empting due process. We did raise issue with the use of a niqab and justifiably so. There is nothing wrong with cultural respect. I will however take issue with cultural difference where a section of society is disadvantaged as a result.


    Anwar Sayed has been charged with fraudulently obtaining $1.125 million from the state and federal governments by falsifying the number of students at the Muslim Ladies College of Australia in Kenwick in Perth’s south.
    Prior to the hearing where the fraud case will be heard, with respect to a witness for the prosecution.


    Defence lawyers have raised concerns about how the jury is expected to read the woman’s facial expressions if they cannot see her face.


    Defence lawyer Mark Trowell told reporters a jury would not be able to “make a proper assessment” of the witness if they could not see her face.


    WA District Court Judge Shauna Deane is due to hear submissions on Thursday from lawyers for the prosecution and defence regarding the witness who wishes to wear the burqa, also called a niqab.
    For what its worth:
    Where I come from it is a requirement that you declare anything/everything that would impair your ability to drive safely. A need to wear a niqab fits into this category, for where it sits tightly on the top of the head, the vale section sits loose and as a result the drivers vision is too readily impaired.
    Last edited by acorn; 05-Aug-2010 at 16:41.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shukkume View Post
    There's a difference between aesthetic and religious reasons.

    Also, all the hateful comments on the article are ticking me off. Sometimes, I don't agree with Islam law, but I give it as much respect as possible in today's world. We need to take her needs into consideration, but she should also know that there are times when the Hijab would be more suitable than the Burqa.
    I am reminded of a youtube video that surfaced earlier this week of four women with their faces fully covered boarding an airplane at an airport in Montreal. One walked through without being looked at, then the male behind her handed the security officer all of their passports and still neither had their face visible and were still allowed to board.

    Last edited by LstNwf; 05-Aug-2010 at 10:16. Reason: Spelling errors

  10. #10

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    Some people haven't read the article: The woman in question in NOT on trial, a MAN named Anwar Sayed is. Just worth clarifying that! She's a witness for the prosecution (I presume, as it's the defence lawyer who's complaining!).

    I personally don't see why not being able to see a witness's face would be a problem, especially in a case like this. I wonder how making a "proper assessment" is dependent on seeing a woman's face. In fact, it's possible to give evidence in court from behind a screen, so that nobody in the court can see you! We do this in all sorts of circumstances, so I don't understand why this laywer is suggesting that seeing a witness's face is somehow now really important.

    This just seems like another silly story motivated by anti-Islam feelings.

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