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Thread: IPv6

  1. #1

    Default IPv6

    I'm a networking major, and currently on my 4th networking class, only two more after this. The other day in class we were talking about IPv4, and IPv6. Our textbook didn't really go into a whole lot of detail, because at the time it was published, there wasn't as much available.

    I did some research on my own, (so I could have something to talk about in my classes online discussion), and I learned that I am not looking forward to total implementation of IPv6. I say this because addresses will not longer be represented like this (10.0.0.1), they will look like this (3ffe:1900:4545:3:200:f8ff:fe21:67cf).

    The second address is a little harder to memorize.

    What do you guys think?

  2. #2

    Default

    Yes but we MUST move to SOMETHING better then IPv4 as we are geting low on Ip address's - why cant they change it to be a lonnger 20.30.30.40.66.72.1.5 ?

    I also heard its a bit faster AND more safer or something but im not a Tech wiz at networking ( tho i would love to get into it..)

    might want to red into this
    http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infoce...mpipv4ipv6.htm

  3. #3

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by Powderhair View Post
    I'm a networking major, and currently on my 4th networking class, only two more after this. The other day in class we were talking about IPv4, and IPv6. Our textbook didn't really go into a whole lot of detail, because at the time it was published, there wasn't as much available.

    I did some research on my own, (so I could have something to talk about in my classes online discussion), and I learned that I am not looking forward to total implementation of IPv6. I say this because addresses will not longer be represented like this (10.0.0.1), they will look like this (3ffe:1900:4545:3:200:f8ff:fe21:67cf).

    The second address is a little harder to memorize.

    What do you guys think?

    Well, the first address 10.0.0.1, is an internal address. You can use IPv4 away internally on your network, unless you plan on using 4 billion devices on a home network. IPv6 is needed for the future of the internet, since we are nearly out of IPv4 addresses, but there is nothing wrong with it for home networking.

    Will you be memorising random addresses of the internet?

  4. #4

    Default

    Just use DNS or some other name resolution system (e.g. NetBIOS) everywhere and you don't have to memorise addresses. The use of hex characters means that we can represent addresses in fewer characters than decimal. 255.255.255.255 can be taken down to ff.ff.ff.ff, for example. That's already shorter. If you take an IPv6 address of ffff:ffff:ffff:ffff:ffff:ffff:ffff:ffff, that would have to be represented as either 65535:65535:65535:65535:65535:65535:65535:65535 or 255.255.255.255.255.255.255.255.255.255.255.255.25 5.255.255.255, neither of which are preferable compared to the hexadecimal representation.

    Basically it's a case of what you're accustomed to, coupled with the fact that we have to have some way of representing addresses in this vast range. As has already been pointed out, you could arguably keep using IPv4 locally, but that would be a little bizarre. The point of IPv6 is that every device in your house could have its own public address. I think that the way IPv6 is generally used is that your main Internet connection is assigned the first half of the address, and then the router assigns the second half of the address to each device, so each device will be globally routable, but you can also set up firewall rules to restrict stuff to local machines by using the IPv6 equivalent of a CIDR range (so probably ffff:ffff:ffff:ffff/64, I guess?).

    We can also get rid of NAT, at last! No more port forwarding (just port unblocking in firewalls), and dealing with problems with only having one public IP address (e.g. when you have more than one Xbox 360 in the house - only one can play online sensibly if you only have one IP address). It'll be magical :P

    The details are a little out of my league, to be honest, but I do know that IPv6 is almost entirely a good thing.

  5. #5

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by Powderhair View Post
    I'm a networking major, and currently on my 4th networking class, only two more after this. The other day in class we were talking about IPv4, and IPv6. Our textbook didn't really go into a whole lot of detail, because at the time it was published, there wasn't as much available.

    I did some research on my own, (so I could have something to talk about in my classes online discussion), and I learned that I am not looking forward to total implementation of IPv6. I say this because addresses will not longer be represented like this (10.0.0.1), they will look like this (3ffe:1900:4545:3:200:f8ff:fe21:67cf).

    The second address is a little harder to memorize.

    What do you guys think?
    Aside: What the hell is a "networking major?" Are you enrolled in a vocational/technical school?

  6. #6

    Default

    it's completely a good thing. The other thing IPv6 will do to help congestion is not let private companies buy private IP spaces. Back when IPv4 was introduced, they auctioned off the different "classes" of IP addresses to companies. they switched over to CIDR, but you can still get a Class "A" netmask from CIDR, who's netmask is 255.0.0.0. which means there are companies/entities that can own 1/256 of all the available addresses in the internet. Most censuses of the actual use of addresses show most are still unused http://www.caida.org/research/id-con...s/20061108.png (that's from like 2006, but still). This is because people bought classes waaay to big for them to use, and they own all the addresses in that class. I think with IPv6 is coming a better way to assign addresses, along with a much larger address space.

  7. #7

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    It'll also make way for more specific IP locations and such, if I remember correctly. Future implementation would allow computers to receive the network variation of reverse 911 calls (so for weather emergencies and such as we move towards an all broadband network). Does anyone know of any specific IP6 only networks that are deployed yet?

  8. #8

    Default

    Its about time we ditched IPv4. They are ultra user-friendly addresses, but they are just too many computer users to keep using xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx. Sure, IPv6 addresses look ugly and are much harder to memorize, but only us code monkeys are meant to see them anyway, so its really no big deal.

  9. #9

    Default

    Also, would IPv6 deter the Cease and Desist letters from legal firms representing the movie, music, and software industries?

  10. #10

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by h3g3l View Post
    Aside: What the hell is a "networking major?" Are you enrolled in a vocational/technical school?
    My housemate has a MEng (Master of Engineering) in some kind of networking/network admin degree, and that was very much not a vocational degree (like my Computer Science BSc arguably was). Note that, in the UK, a MEng isn't a vocational type degree, as Wikipedia suggests that it is in the US - it's still as academic as you can get. His degree started off as a normal computer science course, and then he gradually focussed more and more on networking modules. Put it this way: he got his degree from the University of Southampton - the university that currently employs no less than Sir Tim Berners-Lee. That place ain't a vocational university

    So yes, you can get networking-type degrees (at least in the UK).

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