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Thread: Hypnotism: ye or nay?

  1. #1

    Default Hypnotism: ye or nay?

    So, it's a simple question, do you believe that hypnotism actually works? Do you approve of it? Have you ever tried it/had it tried on you? Have you ever been to a health proffessional who has suggested it?

    Anything and everything you've got to say about it, really!

    EDIT: this isn't centred around AB/DL bedwetting/incontinence style hypnotism, I'm thinking more generally than that, although if you do have any experiences of that then do share!

  2. #2
    LilLillyKitten

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by Talula View Post
    Do you believe that hypnotism actually works?
    Short answer: yes.


    Quote Originally Posted by Talula View Post
    Do you approve of it?
    If it is entirely consensual and non-abusive, sure.


    Quote Originally Posted by Talula View Post
    Have you ever tried it/had it tried on you?
    Yes, many times.


    Quote Originally Posted by Talula View Post
    Have you ever been to a health proffessional who has suggested it?
    Nope.

  3. #3

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    I certainly belive in hypnotism, as a type of suggestion. My mother has been hypnotised by Derren Brown when we saw him live. Moreover, my uncle's hobby is hypnotism, as an anesthetist he needed a way to anesthetise someone who is allergic to anesthetic. Hypnotism works well, so well that he managed to stop my mother smoking, and helped her with her sleeping issues (she's quite clearly very suggestible)

    I must emphasise that not everybody can be hypnotised, only those who are suggestible enough

  4. #4
    LilLillyKitten

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    Stage hypnotism is fake.

    Everyone can be hypnotised, at least with traditional hypnotism, but not everyone can allow themselves to be hypnotised.

  5. #5
    Butterfly Mage

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    I think hypnosis is real, but the stage hypnosis is about as real as professional wrestling. I've been hypnotized once (it's very easy to hypnotize someone with a dissociative disorder). The one who did so was a medical professional. I'm guessing it didn't go as planned since she suggested that it not be attempted again.

  6. #6

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    I never tried it, from a pro, but I'm willing to give it a try, I did try on line but I don't think it did a thing for me.

  7. #7
    LilLillyKitten

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    Yeah, dissociative disorder or any other type of personality disorder can leave you EXTREMELY susceptible to hypnosis... be very careful.

  8. #8
    Butterfly Mage

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    There's certain aspects of my religious practice that I'm sort of apprehensive in exploring too, since DID makes my mind work differently that someone without a dissociative disorder.

  9. #9

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    Stage hypnosis is no more real than stage magic. It's even less so - stage magic, you need to be a decent stage performer as well as be able to perform sleight of hand tricks. Stage hypnotists, however, tell the audience to act silly and call it entertainment. At least juggling takes practice and hand-eye coordinating.

    Hypnotherapy is a bit different. One of the problems, however, is nailing down exactly what hypnotherapy is since there's a wide variety of practitioners and techniques (the hypnotherapists who claim to access past lives and be able to make breasts/penises grow bigger or hair grow back are complete frauds - the ones that claim to be able to fight cancer should be in jail). Ultimately, hypnotherapy is supported only anecdotal evidence, which you can find for pretty much every quack "remedy". That doesn't make hypnotherapy bunk, but it certainly doesn't help its case. The biggest problem facing hypnosis is the complete lack of working theory behind what hypnosis actually does to the brain. It used to be believed that hypnotherapy accesses the "subconscious mind", which regulates our heartbeat, breathing, etc as well as storing our memories. Problem is, modern neurology (especially fMRI scans) show that there is no such thing as the "subconscious mind" - our autonomic system controls our heartbeat and breathing, and those parts of the brain don't have any cognitive ability to access. That's not to say hypnosis is pure nonsense or anything. Studies have shown that it can be used to treat things like fear of flying or compulsive eating. However, in those cases, hypnotherapists are using a crude form of a psychotherapy called "cognitive behavioral therapy", which has been shown to be more effective in treating those same disorders. Throw in the placebo effect (which is very, very powerful), and presto - you have hypnotherapy.

  10. #10
    LilLillyKitten

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    Traditional hypnotism works with association. When we think, there are a variety of ideas that branch off from our current thoughts; there are also thoughts that we do not want to recognize, so they fade into the background. (Our "sub-conscious.")

    The idea here is to strengthen the associations that are already present in order to "grow" that concept. That is the essential focus of traditional hypnotism; the whole Hollywood image of "evil mind control" is pretty unrealistic, unless you're being brainwashed, in which case your psyche will pretty much be obliterated. You have to want the suggestions that you are given in order for them to be incorporated into your thought process; if you don't want something... it won't happen.

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