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Thread: Medical Professionals

  1. #1

    Default Medical Professionals

    Something for those who suffer with incontinence problems ---

    It never ceases to amaze me how often talk to customers who have been to their medical professionals/consultants regarding the problem of their own incontinence in an effort to seek treatment for themselves.

    I have heard it said by both male and female clients of mine - how insensitive these 'professionals' are. Even a nurse who went to seeking treatment who suffers badly got the same deal from a consultant of the same sex.

    Fortunately I am in full control of my continence and not had the ordeal of having to explain and be examined by these people, but it never ceases to amaze me the stories I hear and the lack of respect for fellow humans - it seems that compassion has gone out of the window. It would make me think twice before seeking assistance if I needed it.

    Whilst I would not expect a pat on the head and a cup of tea from these people it does seem that for those people that I have spoken with in Australia there seems a problem - is it something that you have suffered with and is it world wide?

  2. #2

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    Well I would not know from an incontinence point of view. But I have seen many doctors compared to the average American 23 year old (almost), due to a past back problem I had. I had doctors that were very unpassionate and were strictly factual. Which is good to a certain extent being a doctor, but if thats all a doctor is and lacks human compassion for his patients, that doctor should not call himself a good doctor.

    For example, I was when pretty moderately severe pain, and one of my doctors, tried to rapidly decrease my pain medication. Which is a big no no in the medical community due to the severe withdrawl effects. My neurosurgeon about fell over when I told him, encouraged me to report him even! I never did though, because I did not want to loose my medicine all together, plus having that on my medical history would want other doctors turn away from me, probably make them afraid I would report them.

  3. #3

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    pretty much world wide. there are several posts. there are 2 posts on this same page even. scroll down an take a peek

  4. #4

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    This is a world-wide thing. I went to a urologist seeking treatment for testicular pain--SEVERE, DEBILITATING PAIN--because I was in a diaper from incontinence (lifelong), the pain was dismissed as 'insignificant' so the doctor could concentrate on getting me out of the diapers.

    I've also gone into the emergency room where my chart has orders for what to do when I come in with out of control headaches. Yet I still get doctors or nurses looking at me as if I'm looking for a 'hit' of drugs. I still get dumped to the bottom of the treatment list because I'm 'only a headache'.

    Such BS.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by AnalogRTO View Post
    This is a world-wide thing. I went to a urologist seeking treatment for testicular pain--SEVERE, DEBILITATING PAIN--because I was in a diaper from incontinence (lifelong), the pain was dismissed as 'insignificant' so the doctor could concentrate on getting me out of the diapers.

    I've also gone into the emergency room where my chart has orders for what to do when I come in with out of control headaches. Yet I still get doctors or nurses looking at me as if I'm looking for a 'hit' of drugs. I still get dumped to the bottom of the treatment list because I'm 'only a headache'.

    Such BS.
    Doctors can't prescribe diapers. I mean they can, but they don't get kick backs from pharmaceutical companies or can charge your insurance for putting you on very high priced prescription medications so of course you're a headache.

    It's really sad to see that people in the health CARE industry just see you as a quick potential-pill-popping buck.

  6. #6

    Default

    So a few responses from a different point of view...


    Doctors can't prescribe diapers. I mean they can, but they don't get kick backs from pharmaceutical companies or can charge your insurance for putting you on very high priced prescription medications so of course you're a headache.
    It's really sad to see that people in the health CARE industry just see you as a quick potential-pill-popping buck.
    Just want to throw a couple things out there on this topic first, we do not get kickbacks from pharmaceutical companies, there is no exchange of money, and they aren't even allowed to give us pens anymore, and in a lot of academic centers they don't even allow pharm reps to give talks. On the same note we do not get to charge insurance more because we prescribed you a high price medication, we are not the ones filling prescriptions, that job is performed by pharmacists. Reimbursement is a matter of the level and complexity of the visit and what is required and is way too complex to address here, suffice to say the drug I prescribe you to manage your HA at home does not effect my bottom line.

    Finally, in regards to diapers, as others have mentioned in other threads they are only a way to manage a problem, not a way to treat it or address other underlying pathology. In many cases the reason we prescribe medication is because there is something we can treat, or improve it is our responsibility to explain that to the patient, to do otherwise could put us on the wrong end of a lawsuit.



    I've also gone into the emergency room where my chart has orders for what to do when I come in with out of control headaches. Yet I still get doctors or nurses looking at me as if I'm looking for a 'hit' of drugs. I still get dumped to the bottom of the treatment list because I'm 'only a headache'.
    Ok, I'll address the unquoted part of this post at the end, but I just wanted to explain the Emergency Department(ED) perspective in general terms. First off, just because a patient has had real pain before doesn't mean that they aren't seeking drugs this time, in the same way that an individual who came in with "back pain" attempting to get a bit of his narcotic of choice might really have an aortic dissection the next time he stops in for a visit. Because of this we do have to treat each visit individual, and in cases of patients with a chronic issues there tends to be a higher level of suspicion. This is not because chronic issues are any less real, but instead because in many cases there are issues that should be managed in the Primary Care setting, not the Emergency Department.

    So as far as being dumped to the bottom, this is actually probably partially due to the fact that they can tell you have been in for headaches multiple times and that this seems to be a similar case. In this case the chances that the headache is an acute process that is actively trying to kill you is pretty low, because of this you would rank below the category of patients who are either actively attempting to die, or might be actively trying to die but require evaluation. Now what happens next would largely depend on the type of ED you come too, some of them have really good advanced triage or fast track systems, in which case you would be likely to get fairly rapid pain control, however, in other cases, especially overnight, the number of physicians working can be small (maybe only one in community ED's) and if there is a patient who comes in with a MI, Stroke, DKA, coding, or any other acute life threatening condition it might be a while before you are able to get meds. It's not that the pain isn't real, it is just that as things go a chronic, non-emergent medical condition is automatically further down my list then any patient who is presenting with an emergent condition.


    Ok, so finally, on the issues of doctor's being insensitive, sure, a bunch are, but there is no excuse for a physician focusing on the incontinence when you were there for a completely different reason, especially when that reason is an acute complaint. That said, doctors are human, and there are clearly those that are better then others when it comes to compassion and communication. The medical school curriculum is continuing to try to focus on patient-centered care, and making sure that the physician is aware of the patients concerns, both medical and social, as well as being compassionate while providing that care, however, these can be difficult things to teach, and there will always be doctors who are not as skilled at these aspects of medicine.

  7. #7

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    bdb2004, I do understand your post and I do not have anything against the triage process in the emergency room. I agree with it completely and wholeheartedly. Honestly, I went in to the ER once with a TIA and was amazed at how fast I was pulled in for treatment! The TIA wasn't that bad until they started responding to it and then it scared me more than anything in the world.

    Unfortunately, an out of control cluster for me cannot be taken care of in a primary care setting. It must be taken care of either in an emergency room or hospital setting where I can be monitored should I crash. The reason for this is because it takes large doses of serious medications to control the clusters. The highest level of medication I have been given so far to control a single cluster attack is 27mg of morphine. I know what that tends to do to one's breathing.

    Yet I walked out half an hour later--completely normal.

    That tells you how bad the pain can get. I've had blood pressure elevate to 240/160. Very dangerous, I know, and yet I still get seen as drug seeking. I'm not in the emergency room weekly with these--it's about every two months that one goes beyond control.

    I get annoyed when I'm in the ER; some of the meds I'm on help to lower my blood pressure (prophylactic meds for the cluster HA), yet the pain has my blood pressure elevated to 165/90. I'm screaming with the pain, banging my head against the wall, and rocking back and forth. The part that is bothering me is that the triage nurse has someone who has come in with cold and flu symptoms and no primary care doctor as higher priority. They are less likely to die than I am; the elevated BP could lead to a stroke.

    On top of that, all of my information is in my chart, put there by my neurologist so that they can fast track me, they don't have to worry about all of these behaviors or concerns, and they can treat me and get on to the other patients with their time. Will they read it? Maybe, or maybe they'll decide they know better.

  8. #8

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    I have talked to my doctors about my incontinence for years with no result at all.

  9. #9

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    I really don't trust doctors anymore...
    I was told for sixteen years that my constipation and refusal to use the toilet was "my fault"

    Utter bullshit. You can't blame ME when I try and then STOP because it hurts... you don't tell a little kid to continue something despite the skull splitting headache when it's inground from birth that "if it hurts STOP DOING IT"

    Yes, it hurt like hell to not use the bathroom, but it hurt A LOT MORE to try.

    All they wanted to do was throw pills and other bullshit at 'the problem', so I really can't trust doctors

  10. #10

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    Having had incontinence issues for 21 + years I've seen doctors of all types. The unemotional responces we get while in pain or when were having other issues are just irritating. I understand they dont want to get emotionally involved for professional reasons but it still drives me nuts!

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