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Thread: Working out

  1. #1

    Default Working out

    I haven't worked out in several years. Unfortunately, I have to pass a physical assessment test for a job I'm trying to get.

    I've been working out once or twice a day for a week. I was assured that chest muscles develop quickly and that I should see an almost immediate increase in the number of push-ups I can do. This sentiment was mirrored by several people who shared accounts of boot camp and rapid acceleration of the ability to do push-ups and sit-ups.

    However, after a week I have seen no improvement in number before my muscles revolt and simply refuse to do another before I rest, or in ease of the task in general.

    Are the guys advising me overstating the gain, or am I simply genetically predispositioned to only be able to heft 260lbs so many times before my muscles start calling me names that most men wouldn't dare.

  2. #2

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    Well, i'm too fat to do many push-ups, but I have been working out with a machine lately. The main point I can remember is that you need to have an on day, and an off day, alternating between exercise one day, and letting your muscles heal by taking the next day off. Working out puts a lot of stress on each muscle that is worked on, and they need time to recover.

    That's probably the reason that you aren't seeing much improvement, because you're pushing your muscles too hard. You should also be doing two or three sets of each exercise on the days that you do work out, with a set in this case being as many as you can do before needing to take a short break (Though as I recall, a normal set where you control the amount of weight you're lifting should be tensioning the muscle you're working for 40-60 seconds, you don't control the weight with push-ups, so I would just do as many as you can in one sitting.)

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Khaymen View Post
    Are the guys advising me overstating the gain, or am I simply genetically predispositioned to only be able to heft 260lbs so many times before my muscles start calling me names that most men wouldn't dare.
    lol, made me think of this: YouTube - Old Spice | Flex :30
    Its going to take around a month before you notice anything. It happens in stages (and you have to watch your food as well). Drink almost all water and often. Don't use powders and salted hydrating drinks. Calisthenics work great when you need to work out and don't have equipment. Things like muscle fatigue recovery and aerobic movements like climbing stairs will happen quicker and with less effort. Get a routine down to work out strong every 3 days for 30 minutes (or whatever works best for you) and keep at it no matter what. You'll see improvements just don't expect immediate results.

  4. #4

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    First to second week you shouldn't notice much. But from 2nd to 3rd you might.

    How are you training? How many reps and sets?

    I'm helping my bro train for the army at the moment. We were both weak bastards and skinny as. (Still am) We started on 15,12 and 10 pushups with a 1 min 30 rest between. Then 1 min 30 before repeating and repeating 3 times. This was followed by 3 sets of 30 situps with a 1 min 30 rest. This was our core muscles and upper body and we did this Monday's, Wed and Fris. On Tues and Thurs we did our lats in the form of wide grip chin ups (3 sets of 6 but now we're up to 12) and then went for a run.
    Every 6 weeks we take a 1 week break and after returning from our break you DEFINITELY notice the difference.
    Just remember, what you're training is your muscle endurance, not your strength, when you are doing lots of pushups. Endurance is high reps and low weight. Increase the weight and decrease the reps for strength. (Lift more) Decide what you want to train, endurance or strength, and then focus on that.
    Also, make sure you are using proper technique. The best way to check is by looking up your local defence force site as they may have videos of exactly how to do them to get the best gains with the minimum injury risk.

    Anyway, you should notice the difference after 4 weeks but definitely not 1 week unless you have been fairly fit in the last couple of years and just getting back to peak condition. We've been going since October last year and we're up to 5 sets of 25 pushups with a 45 second rest between.

    Be careful of overtraining, eat well, stay hydrated and good luck.

  5. #5

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    My dad got these workout videos called P90X, and I did them with him until he broke his ankle. I'm a skinny guy and was pretty fit to begin with, so I did see rapid improvement. I went from being able to do 30 pull ups and 80 push ups in an hour to being able to do 80 pull ups and I lost count of how many push ups. I was able to actually finish their sit up routine (it was insane), and I was able to last through all of their cardio exercises where I could only get half way through the first time. All of this in a short three weeks.

    What those videos had that I wouldn't have been able to do on my own is variety. I didn't just do 80 pull ups, I did 10 over hand, 10 reverse, 8 wide, 5 close, and so on. They also had a tun of different kinds of sit ups.

    This will be my bit of advise. Look up different kinds of exercises and try to do them all on the day you're working that area. Even if you only manage one... or in my case with the push up section... a half. When you can manage one or two, it will feel like a huge accomplishment, and it will be.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Khaymen View Post
    I haven't worked out in several years. Unfortunately, I have to pass a physical assessment test for a job I'm trying to get.

    I've been working out once or twice a day for a week. I was assured that chest muscles develop quickly and that I should see an almost immediate increase in the number of push-ups I can do. This sentiment was mirrored by several people who shared accounts of boot camp and rapid acceleration of the ability to do push-ups and sit-ups.

    However, after a week I have seen no improvement in number before my muscles revolt and simply refuse to do another before I rest, or in ease of the task in general.

    Are the guys advising me overstating the gain, or am I simply genetically predispositioned to only be able to heft 260lbs so many times before my muscles start calling me names that most men wouldn't dare.
    Its well known amongst endurance athletes that you get the benefit of today's workout in two weeks (plus or minus depending on the session and your age...). That's why distance runners, triathletes, swimmers, etc build up their training volume over time, with the longest hardest sessions 2-3 weeks before a big event like Nationals, Worlds, Ironman, doing progressivelly easier shorter sessions leading up to the big day, and maybe nothing but easy warmups the two days before.

    Its called tapering and peaking.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Khaymen View Post
    I've been working out once or twice a day for a week.
    However, after a week
    There's your problem right there.

    You gain significantly more muscle if you give your muscles time to repair and recuperate, especialy since you haven't worked out in several years. Working out twice a day, every day, gives your muscles no time to repair all the tears you make when you lift heavy weights.

    Also, you can't expect to see ANY results from ANY exercise regime after only a week. Give it time.

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