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Thread: Moving from Windows->OSX based computers at church

  1. #1

    Default Moving from Windows->OSX based computers at church

    If you want to skip all the back story you can just read the last paragraph

    First and foremost I've always been a Windows person this is largely because of my distaste with Apple's strongarm marketing tactics and draconian control of all aspects of hardware/software that go on their machines as well as their inflated prices compared to comparable builds from Windows based vendors.

    Long story short the church I volunteer at is moving to Mac's I told the guy what my thoughts on Apple are but being the laid back person I am told him that I'd help them spec out the computer they'd need for the presentation software they are wanting to move to.

    Anyway I'm going to be buying a MBP laptop in order to aquatint myself with the OSX operating system. So I don't feel like a complete noob whenever they have me show up to run the software. I'll probably end up using the MBP as a sort of netbook as well as my desktop replacement/gaming laptop/whatever Sager 9262 is hardly fitting of the term portable.

    Anyone here have any suggestions/experience's for learning OSX coming from Windows?

  2. #2

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    Use none of your Windows logic. It will not work here. Your best bet (if the MBP is being shipped) is to use Linux/Ubuntu. I know it's crazy but the vague basis of both the operating systems using Unix will get you a leg up on how the file system works.

  3. #3

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    I've heard the kernel they use is similar and while I haven't had time to mess with my linux box as much as I'd like I am familiar with linux having had linux installed in one form or another on a box at my house for about 3-4 years. Though since I don't use it regularly I always have to relearn all of the commands.

    Though I have to say I never did understand the file system structure...

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by jiffypop45 View Post
    Though I have to say I never did understand the file system structure...
    It's hard for me too. Going from a pure 'wtf is windows doing now' gui interface to a 'google the piss out of it' cli interface it goes beyond relearning and needing to forget all previous Windows knowledge altogether. Never struck me how two operating systems could make a computer behave so differently.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by jiffypop45 View Post
    I've heard the kernel they use is similar and while I haven't had time to mess with my linux box as much as I'd like I am familiar with linux having had linux installed in one form or another on a box at my house for about 3-4 years. Though since I don't use it regularly I always have to relearn all of the commands.

    Though I have to say I never did understand the file system structure...
    *NIX-type FSes (RiserFS, NFS, AFS, HPFS, HPFS+, EXT2, EXT3, etc.) have been built to be modular. You can actually have "/" ("root"), "etc," "usr," "var," and so forth on different disk slices or disks. Indeed, with NFS/AFS, you can auto-mount remote filesystems.

    This gives you a LOT more flexibility than FAT-based FSes (FAT, FAT32, NTFS), that operate using drive letters. There are tons of differences "under the hood," but that's way beyond this discussion. For you, under OS X, you're going to crawl around in the following directories most often:

    /Applications: All your system-wide applications (calculator, dictionary).
    /Applications/Utilities: All your system-wide utilities (disk mounter, grab).
    /Library: System-wide preferences and p-lists go here.
    /Users: The home of all users on the system.
    /Users/<username>/Desktop: The desktop of a specific user.
    /Users/<username>/Library: Per-user preferences and p-lists go here.



    Quote Originally Posted by kite View Post
    It's hard for me too. Going from a pure 'wtf is windows doing now' gui interface to a 'google the piss out of it' cli interface it goes beyond relearning and needing to forget all previous Windows knowledge altogether. Never struck me how two operating systems could make a computer behave so differently.
    CLI? Depends on what you want to do with OS X. As for me, I do lots of things in CLI because I'm a *NIX-head and that's just how I do things. Is it the Apple way? Nooooo. I would advise OP to steer away from this, otherwise he'll end up dicking around with CLI rather than learning the "Apple Way" of doing things. :P

    OS X is like Excel*: it's simple to look at, can be used intuitively ... until you want to do something hard. THEN you get to use the other 98% of the system and see just how deep the rabbit-hole goes.


    * I've built machine-learning algorithms in Excel. It's much more powerful and flexible than most people understand. I suppose I use ... about 25% of Excel.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by h3g3l View Post
    CLI? Depends on what you want to do with OS X. As for me, I do lots of things in CLI because I'm a *NIX-head and that's just how I do things. Is it the Apple way? Nooooo. I would advise OP to steer away from this, otherwise he'll end up dicking around with CLI rather than learning the "Apple Way" of doing things. :P

    OS X is like Excel*: it's simple to look at, can be used intuitively ... until you want to do something hard. THEN you get to use the other 98% of the system and see just how deep the rabbit-hole goes.


    * I've built machine-learning algorithms in Excel. It's much more powerful and flexible than most people understand. I suppose I use ... about 25% of Excel.
    About the CLI, I was more talking about using Ubuntu and getting all cosy with the Terminal on there (didn't know the new macs even *had* one...).
    Never understood Excel because, like you said, it's deep...
    Something I wish Windows took from Ubuntu/Linux devs is apt-get and it's intuitiveness with the repositories as well as the Ubuntu Software Center. No more driver and program hunting on sketchy websites would make my life so much easier, especially when reverting to XP.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by kite View Post
    Something I wish Windows took from Ubuntu/Linux devs is apt-get and it's intuitiveness with the repositories as well as the Ubuntu Software Center. No more driver and program hunting on sketchy websites would make my life so much easier, especially when reverting to XP.
    YESH. FreeBSD has the ports collection. OS X now has the Sparkle framework.

    OP: You can get something like AppFresh to blast through the system (via Sparkle) and keep applications updated.

  8. #8

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    Just get a book on OS X that walks you through things. There are tons of them and they're easy to read.

    After using windows from 3.1 -> 2003 server, I moved to mac with very little resistance. I use both OS X and various versions Windows now. If you've ever used any kind of *nix system, it's much like that with a ridiculously better GUI experience (that is also, imo, a ridiculously better experience than anything windows offered when I switched. I haven't used Windows 7.).

    There's really one one "big deal" switching to mac that you need to remember, and it seems nit picky... It's not the window controls being on the other side... or the fact that every window's menu is in the same place... etc. The one thing that can bite you in the ass is, when you copy a folder into another folder that has a folder with the same name in it... it replaces the existing folder not merges with it as windows does.

    Watching someone do that the first time is cringe-worthy.

    I recommend anyone that's using OS X from Windows... bind expose' and get in the habit of using it regularly. It will make you wonder how the taskbar and alt-tab has stuck around so long as the primary way of navigating open windows.

  9. #9

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    You can dual install windows on your intell based mac. So, if you still hate it, just install windows using boot camp.

    Mac OSX is pretty easy, def user-based. I moved from windows for Mac OSX last year and I haven't looked back yet.

  10. #10

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    Well I already have a Sager 9262 which is a desktop replacement gaming quality laptop (It'll run crysis at it's native res 1920x1200 on max with 0x AA smoothly). So it's not like I'm trying to switch and I don't plan on dual booting the machine because of my Sager which has Windows 7 64bit on it.

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