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Thread: Emulators

  1. #1

    Default Emulators

    Do any of you use a emulators to play old school games on your pc.

    I have a Sega, NES and SNES emulator on my pc

  2. #2
    GaashaHuzzah

    Default

    Ya' know technically, those are illegal.

  3. #3
    Mesmerale

    Default

    I've got an SNES, N64, and GBA Emulators. ^_^

    So fun.



    Quote Originally Posted by CuteGaachan View Post
    Ya' know technically, those are illegal.
    Not quite, darling. If I remember correctly, it's not illegal because, at the time, copyright laws didn't think to include this kind of thing. (Emulating games and consoles online wasn't possible, and hadn't been thought of.)

    All except for Mario. They had the idea, and copyrighted him completely. Emulating Mario games, and the majority of newer consoles and games (Nintendo DS, Wii, PS3, etc.) is illegal, but the vast majority of the older ones is perfectly legal.

    As far as I can remember...

  4. #4

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by CuteGaachan View Post
    Ya' know technically, those are illegal.
    Only if (1) It's being sold (and 2) If you've never owned the system itself.

    Anyway, yeah, I use VisualBoy Advance (GBA), no$gba (DS), EPSXE (PS1), and snes9x (SNES).
    For each, I dont play many games; in respective order, my most played are Pokemon Liquid Ocean (its a hacked game), Megaman Star Force 2, Megaman X6, and Super Metroid.

    For DS, I generally only download games that dont involve the touch screen much, just for menus. The others I just get outdated games that I missed or feel like playing again. I used to have an N64 one, but I got pissed when my Majora's Mask crashed and I lost my save =P

  5. #5

    Default

    From : Is this stuff legal? - Classic Gaming
    Is this stuff legal?

    Depends on what your definition of "legal" is.

    As far as emulators go, all emulators are legal. It's not illegal to emulate something, unless the emulator contains copyrighted material such as a BIOS image. Most emulators don't, and the ones that do usually have permission to distribute such material.

    ROMs are another story. Most fall in a huge "gray area," as they are technically copyrighted but are not making anyone money or still being sold. ClassicGaming.com only covers games for discontinued systems, as they are no longer making their manufacturer any money. In some cases, the company that holds the copyright to these games doesn't even exist anymore. Still, technically, it can be illegal for you to download these ROMs. It's kind of like jaywalking.

    There are exceptions. Some companies have released their games to the public domain or condoned not-for-profit distribution. An example of this is ROMs for the Vectrex. These are perfectly 100% legal, as long as they're not distributed for profit.

    ROMs may be legal to download if you already own the cartridge (or diskette) they originally came on. Some say that all ROMs are legal to download as long as you delete the ones you don't own within 24 hours. This may or may not be true. The legalization of ROMs is a very complicated issue, in some cases.

    Another exception is "New Classics." New Classics is the term used to describe new games written for old systems. That's right, people are still writing games for the ColecoVision, the Atari 2600, Gameboy and other systems. "But that's impossible!" you might say. "They just can't write games for those systems! How do they get them on a cartridge?" Well, usually, they don't. Programmers write the game and release it as a ROM image. They don't need to make a cartridge, since emulators can run their game.

    At one time, there wasn't exactly a large number of these "New Classics," as it takes a lot of patience, skill, and research to program them. But since CG.Com opened in '97 the development of these "New Classics" (usually refered to as Homebrew's) has grown immensely. Some, such as Vectrex game developer Christopher Tumber have even been able to make enough in this market to support a nice catalog of new games. More often than not, many of these homebrew games are also released in limited numbers in actual cartridge format with professional packaging. Many homebrew games are interesting, some of them are pretty damn fun, and they're all legal. However, the homebrew scene has also lead to the development of another class of "New Classics": the "hack". Some developers have taken original game ROM images and changed them artistically by either enhancing the graphics or sound, and sometimes even the game play. While there is new code written for these, they are still based off the original commercially released game ROM. So these "hacks" also lie in that "grey area" mentioned earlyer. You can find "Homebrews" in our Game Vault (search for "New Classic") or you can find many hombrew and hack ROM's, as well as actual cartridge versions for sale at game sites like Atari Age.

    To sum things up, most ROMs are technically illegal if you do not own the games in another form, while almost all emulators are completely legal.

  6. #6

    Default

    Emulators rule IMO, i have all the systems, cause i don't like to "re-set-up" my hardware versions of those systems.

  7. #7
    GaashaHuzzah

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by baby_mike View Post
    From : Is this stuff legal? - Classic Gaming
    Is this stuff legal?

    Depends on what your definition of "legal" is.

    As far as emulators go, all emulators are legal. It's not illegal to emulate something, unless the emulator contains copyrighted material such as a BIOS image. Most emulators don't, and the ones that do usually have permission to distribute such material.

    ROMs are another story. Most fall in a huge "gray area," as they are technically copyrighted but are not making anyone money or still being sold. ClassicGaming.com only covers games for discontinued systems, as they are no longer making their manufacturer any money. In some cases, the company that holds the copyright to these games doesn't even exist anymore. Still, technically, it can be illegal for you to download these ROMs. It's kind of like jaywalking.

    There are exceptions. Some companies have released their games to the public domain or condoned not-for-profit distribution. An example of this is ROMs for the Vectrex. These are perfectly 100% legal, as long as they're not distributed for profit.

    ROMs may be legal to download if you already own the cartridge (or diskette) they originally came on. Some say that all ROMs are legal to download as long as you delete the ones you don't own within 24 hours. This may or may not be true. The legalization of ROMs is a very complicated issue, in some cases.

    Another exception is "New Classics." New Classics is the term used to describe new games written for old systems. That's right, people are still writing games for the ColecoVision, the Atari 2600, Gameboy and other systems. "But that's impossible!" you might say. "They just can't write games for those systems! How do they get them on a cartridge?" Well, usually, they don't. Programmers write the game and release it as a ROM image. They don't need to make a cartridge, since emulators can run their game.

    At one time, there wasn't exactly a large number of these "New Classics," as it takes a lot of patience, skill, and research to program them. But since CG.Com opened in '97 the development of these "New Classics" (usually refered to as Homebrew's) has grown immensely. Some, such as Vectrex game developer Christopher Tumber have even been able to make enough in this market to support a nice catalog of new games. More often than not, many of these homebrew games are also released in limited numbers in actual cartridge format with professional packaging. Many homebrew games are interesting, some of them are pretty damn fun, and they're all legal. However, the homebrew scene has also lead to the development of another class of "New Classics": the "hack". Some developers have taken original game ROM images and changed them artistically by either enhancing the graphics or sound, and sometimes even the game play. While there is new code written for these, they are still based off the original commercially released game ROM. So these "hacks" also lie in that "grey area" mentioned earlyer. You can find "Homebrews" in our Game Vault (search for "New Classic") or you can find many hombrew and hack ROM's, as well as actual cartridge versions for sale at game sites like Atari Age.

    To sum things up, most ROMs are technically illegal if you do not own the games in another form, while almost all emulators are completely legal.
    And now I know!

    And knowing is half the battle!

  8. #8

    Default

    I like to emulate PSX and SNES games on my PSP. I play emulated games on it more than actual PSP games actually.

  9. #9

  10. #10

    Default

    I've been playing with a DOS emulator to play old PC games I grew up with.
    Personally...I find it pretty cool

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