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Thread: The XY Chromosome Bender

  1. #1

    Default The XY Chromosome Bender

    Is the X-Y Chromosome (the male/female gene structure) flexible/bendable? Is the sex of an individual cut-and-dry or is it more of a 'guideline' rather than law?
    The reason why I bring this up is because of someone close to me is triple XXX chromosome and seems to have more of a broad, 'manly' physique, where as mine is more feminine and spindly in some areas.

  2. #2

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    I believe your friend is called a lesbian. I'm not exactly sure how that's possible in scientific terms, but please explain it to me.

  3. #3

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    Triple X syndrome - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    That's probably the best chromosome anomaly to have. Pretty much all the other one cause serious physical and mental problems if the fetus even survives to term.

    There are also people with different sex organs than their DNA would suggest. Biological males with two X chromosomes and women with Ys.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swyer_syndrome
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/XX_male_syndrome

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by BabyGrizzy View Post
    I believe your friend is called a lesbian. I'm not exactly sure how that's possible in scientific terms, but please explain it to me.
    Triple X syndrome, also called trisomy X or 47,XXX, is characterized by the presence of an additional X chromosome in each of a female's cells. Although females with this condition may be taller than average, this chromosomal change typically causes no unusual physical features. Most females with triple X syndrome have normal sexual development and are able to conceive children.

    Triple X syndrome is associated with an increased risk of learning disabilities and delayed development of speech and language skills. Delayed development of motor skills (such as sitting and walking), weak muscle tone (hypotonia), and behavioral and emotional difficulties are also possible, but these characteristics vary widely among affected girls and women. Seizures or kidney abnormalities occur in about 10 percent of affected females.

  5. #5

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    Other than Triple X, are other mutations or defections of this gene group that aren't as severe? For example, can one person be classified as XX/XY and have a more feminine/masculine quality to them due to slight variations in the gene group?

  6. #6

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    Sexuality is defined by the Y chromosome in the 23rd chromosomal pair (the sexual chromosomes... XX or XY in normal cases), it triggers a transcription factor (SRY [Sex-determining Region Y]) that triggers even more transcription factors (SOX 9, SF1, FIM, FG9), which in a very broad spectrum is what gives you your sex. Now, SOX9 inhibits the "female transcription factor" WNT4 which, if not inhibited by SOX9 (which is triggered by the Y chromosome) triggers more transcription factors (DAX1 [which inhibits SOX9) and starts female genitalia development.

    XY -> SRY -> SOX9 (Inhibits WNT4) -> SF1 + other genes = male development
    XX -> WNT4 (Non-inhibited, therefore it's active) -> DAX1 (Inhibits SOX9) + other genes = female development

    Now, there are many possible sexual differentiation defects, but your friend's case (47,XXX) shouldn't affect her sexual development since SOX9 was inhibited by the lack of inhibition of WNT4.

    Edit: Lol, in the time it took me to remember all this stuff (and actually grab my embryology book for some accurate references) 3 people cited wikipedia or another public source.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zagete View Post
    Sexuality is defined by the Y chromosome in the 23rd chromosomal pair (the sexual chromosomes... XX or XY in normal cases), it triggers a transcription factor (SRY [Sex-determining Region Y]) that triggers even more transcription factors (SOX 9, SF1, FIM, FG9), which in a very broad spectrum is what gives you your sex. Now, SOX9 inhibits the "female transcription factor" WNT4 which, if not inhibited by SOX9 (which is triggered by the Y chromosome) triggers more transcription factors (DAX1 [which inhibits SOX9) and starts female genitalia development.

    XY -> SRY -> SOX9 (Inhibits WNT4) -> SF1 + other genes = male development
    XX -> WNT4 (Non-inhibited, therefore it's active) -> DAX1 (Inhibits SOX9) + other genes = female development

    Now, there are many possible sexual differentiation defects, but your friend's case (47,XXX) shouldn't affect her sexual development since SOX9 was inhibited by the lack of inhibition of WNT4.

    Edit: Lol, in the time it took me to remember all this stuff (and actually grab my embryology book for some accurate references) 3 people cited wikipedia or another public source.
    Amazing! Simply amazing analysis!
    So it seems as if any variation in the quantity/potency of those chemicals could have a range of affects on one's sex. Does this also affect one's internal sex as well (in the case of MtF/FtM, transgendered and the like)?

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by kite View Post
    Amazing! Simply amazing analysis!
    So it seems as if any variation in the quantity/potency of those chemicals could have a range of affects on one's sex. Does this also affect one's internal sex as well (in the case of MtF/FtM, transgendered and the like)?
    No one actually knows (I believe), but if I had to bet on a root for MtF/FtM and transgenderism to develop, i'd say it would have to be a psychological one... All that stuff is certainly not only gonadal-related, but it has neurological and psychological issues around it.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zagete View Post
    Sexuality is defined by the Y chromosome in the 23rd chromosomal pair (the sexual chromosomes... XX or XY in normal cases), it triggers a transcription factor (SRY [Sex-determining Region Y]) that triggers even more transcription factors (SOX 9, SF1, FIM, FG9), which in a very broad spectrum is what gives you your sex. Now, SOX9 inhibits the "female transcription factor" WNT4 which, if not inhibited by SOX9 (which is triggered by the Y chromosome) triggers more transcription factors (DAX1 [which inhibits SOX9) and starts female genitalia development.

    XY -> SRY -> SOX9 (Inhibits WNT4) -> SF1 + other genes = male development
    XX -> WNT4 (Non-inhibited, therefore it's active) -> DAX1 (Inhibits SOX9) + other genes = female development

    Now, there are many possible sexual differentiation defects, but your friend's case (47,XXX) shouldn't affect her sexual development since SOX9 was inhibited by the lack of inhibition of WNT4.

    Edit: Lol, in the time it took me to remember all this stuff (and actually grab my embryology book for some accurate references) 3 people cited wikipedia or another public source.
    I'm going to add to this that the SRY gene is what really matters as far as secondary sexual development is concerned.

    You can have an XY female if the SRY gene on the Y chromosome is defective. You can have am XX male if he has a trans-located SRY gene on one of the X chromosomes.

  10. #10

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    I believe there was a study not to long ago that said the gender at birth could possibly be changed without surgery, based on the fact that the body struggles to remain the gender it is...

    Battle of the sexes - one gene keeps us either male or female, scientists find - Telegraph

    It would be cool to change your gender on a whim though.

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