View Poll Results: Fav. Browser Engine

Voters
15. You may not vote on this poll
  • Trident

    0 0%
  • Gecko

    7 46.67%
  • WebKit

    7 46.67%
  • Presto

    1 6.67%
Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: browser engine

  1. #1

    Default browser engine

    whats your favorite browser engine.


    Trident
    Gecko
    WebKit
    Presto

  2. #2

    Default

    Can you explain each of them, please? I use Mozilla, which I know is Gecko, but I'm not familiar with the others.

  3. #3

    Default

    Trident
    Popular Browsers & Applications: Internet Explorer, Avant Browser, Maxathon, Microsoft Outlook, Outlook Express, AOL Browser
    License: Closed-Source
    Acid2 Compatible: Yes (in version VI included in Internet Explorer 8)
    Acid3 Compatible: No
    Operating Systems: Windows
    Major Contributors: Microsoft
    Share: Prior to 2004, 95% of browsers on the Internet, now approx 70%.
    First Released: April 1997

    First released with Internet Explorer 4.0 and still in use today, Trident was designed as a software component to allow software developers to easily (and freely) add web browsing functionality to their own Windows applications. The overwhelming majority of third party developers that integrate web browsing into their software use the Trident engine (mshtml.dll) such as Avant Browser and Maxathon as well as programs such as AOL Instant Messenger, Google Talk, Valve Steam, Pandion and many others.

    However, a few notable Microsoft products no longer use Trident as their rendering engine, which may be an indication Microsoft is developing a replacement for the now 11 year old engine. Expression Web uses its own engine which Microsoft claims is the most standards-compliant on the market today. Internet Explorer Mobile also does not use Trident, but a engine custom developed for the Windows Mobile platform.

    Internet Explorer 5 for Mac did not use the Trident engine, but a custom engine known as Tasman, although previous versions of Internet Explorer for Mac did use Trident. Development of Internet Explorer for Mac was halted in roughly 2003, but development of Tasman continued to a limited extent, and was later included in Office 2004 for Mac in their Entourage product.

    It had been rumored that Tasman would replace Trident in Internet Explorer 7, but as of the Internet Explorer 8 beta, Trident is still Microsoft's engine of choice.

    Gecko
    Popular Browsers & Applications: Firefox, Camino, Flock, Thunderbird, Seamonkey, Epiphany, NVU, Netscape, K-Meleon
    License: Open-Source
    Acid2 Compatible: Yes
    Acid3 Compatible: No
    Operating Systems: Windows, Mac OS X, Linux/BSD
    Major Contributors: Mozilla Corporation, Netscape (originally)
    Share: Approx 20%
    First Released: December 1998

    Development of the Gecko layout engine began at Netscape in 1997. The original Netscape rendering engine was considered to be slow and not compliant with W3C standards, compared to the one used in Microsoft Internet Explorer at the time. Ironically, today these are two complaints now typically directed at the Trident engine used by Internet Explorer. First called Raptor, this name was changed to NGLayout due to trademark issues. Netscape later changed the name to Gecko. In July 2003, AOL (which had purchased Netscape in 1998) spun off development of the Gecko engine to the Mozilla Foundation.

    Because Gecko (and the popular Firefox browser that drives it's development) are open source, other companies use it to develop their own browsers and applications. Gecko is now seen by some developers as a superior alternative to the Trident engine because it is cross platform and also lacks many of the security vurnalibilties of the more popular Trident engine.

    WebKit
    Popular Browsers & Applications: Safari, Chrome, Adobe AIR, iCab, Epiphany (experimental), Konqueror (KHTML)
    License: Open-Source
    Acid2 Compatible: Yes
    Acid3 Compatible: Yes
    Operating Systems: Windows, Mac OS X, Linux/BSD
    Major Contributors: WebKit Foundation, Apple, Nokia, Adobe, Google, KDE Team (originally)
    Share: Approx 7%
    First Released: January 2003 (forked from KHTML, which was first released in October 2000)

    The first applications based on KHTML were released in October 2000 by the KDE team, around their Konqueror file and web browser. WebKit was forked from the Konqueror browser’s KHTML library, by Apple, Inc., for use as the engine of Safari web browser.

    Google's recently released Chrome browser, along with the upcoming Android mobile phone platform, also use WebKit as their browser engine. WebKit is used on the iPhone and iPod touch to render content within the device’s web browser and email software. Adobe also uses the WebKit engine to render HTML & javascript inside of Adobe AIR applications. The team behind the browser Epiphany announced in April 2008 that it will use WebKit exclusively, and stop using the Gecko layout engine. Epiphany is a web browser for the GNOME desktop used by Linux.

    Presto
    Popular Browsers & Applications: Opera Desktop/Mobile/Mini, Nintendo DS, Wii Internet Channel, Macromedia Dreamweaver MX and above, Adobe CS 2 and above
    License: Closed-Source
    Acid2 Compatible: Yes
    Acid3 Compatible: Yes
    Operating Systems: Windows, Mac OS X, Linux/BSD
    Major Contributors: Opera Software
    Share: Less than 2%
    First Released: November 2002

    Presto is the code name for the engine for the Opera web browser developed by Opera Software replacing the Elektra engine used in versions 4–6 of the browser. Unlike Trident, Gecko and WebKit... Preseto is available only as a part of Opera browser or related products. Neither the source or binary forms of the engine are freely available for integration into third party products.

    Adobe has licensed Opera technology for use in the Adobe Creative Suite applications, however, given Adobe's recent promotion of WebKit inside of AIR, their use of Presto technology in CS should be short lived.

  4. #4

    Default

    My favorite engine is WebKit because it has the most advanced support of HTML5 and CSS3. However, both of the major browsers that use it don't appeal to me, and have a limited market share so those features are not really available to use.

    My favorite browser's (Opera) engine (Presto) suffers from a case of "too big, too slow" especially in javascript heavy apps (everything else about the browser is fast (downloading pages, IRC, email) so it's a pity the JS engine lets it down.

    IEs engine has recently made huge leaps and bounds in the javascript department, overtaking Opera (and Firefox, until 3.5 was released) speed-wise, and finally mostly supports the CSS it claims to do (CSS2)

  5. #5
    DannyTheNinja

    Default

    I find WebKit to be the best because it's blazing fast, entirely cross platform, supports different Javascript backends easily, and is highly standards compliant.

    Despite this, I use Firefox for all my daily browsing, mainly because of the extensions (Firebug) and Google Chrome for Linux's lack of plugin support.

    --Danny

  6. #6
    Dude84

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by Dreamaker View Post
    ...

    IEs engine has recently made huge leaps and bounds in the javascript department, overtaking Opera (and Firefox, until 3.5 was released) speed-wise, and finally mostly supports the CSS it claims to do (CSS2)
    Yes, it certainly appears to have. There are certain websites I don't regularly use Firefox for anymore (Alliance & Leicester online banking, Coke Zone, and Channel 4 On-demand) because they run so poorly on Firefox it's intolerable.

  7. #7

    Default

    I like Webkit and Chrome, but I use Firefox predominately. Firefox is my day-to-day browser and Chrome is when I want all the distractions gone(I have no extensions) or just something different.
    Markdude84, have you tried IE tab? It lets you use Trident in Firefox on a tab by tab basis.
    Last edited by tenlet; 04-Aug-2009 at 02:24. Reason: Grammar: Run-on

  8. #8

    Default

    It's worth noting that the versions of iCab that run on Classic don't use Webkit; they use the Crystal Atari Browser engine. And despite this; the even CSS heavy pages render beautifully~

  9. #9
    Dude84

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by tenlet View Post
    I like Webkit and Chrome, but I use Firefox predominately. Firefox is my day-to-day browser and Chrome is when I want all the distractions gone(I have no extensions) or just something different.
    Markdude84, have you tried IE tab? It lets you use Trident in Firefox on a tab by tab basis.
    I'd never even heard of it to be honest. I will certainly look into it, thanks.

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