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Thread: cordless phones and 802.11n

  1. #1

    Default cordless phones and 802.11n

    do any of you guys have any problems with interference from cordless phones on an 802.11n network(5GHz)

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by audio file View Post
    do any of you guys have any problems with interference from cordless phones on an 802.11n network(5GHz)
    The only time you should have interference is when they are on the same bandwidth like 2.4 GHz phones and 2.4 GHz wireless routers. I have a 2.4 GHz router and 5.8 GHz handsets.. the 5.8 GHz get REALLY good range. I can talk on the phone while getting the mail.. I bet I could even talk half way down the street.

  3. #3

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    the 2.4GHz half of the router works just fine and the 5.5GHz half gets interference from the 5.8GHz phones pretty bad, bad enough to slow the data rate and decrease signal range to the point where 802.11g reaches farther than the 802.11n which is supposed to have the better range of the two so I don't know what to do short of getting new phones because I've changed the channel many times with little effect

  4. #4

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    Looks like you may just have to get new phones.. maybe going back to corded phones is the solution.

  5. #5

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    900Mhz spread spectrum man, I actually get twice the range with our kitchen phone over the rest of the 5.8Ghz phones. Also the 900Mhz band is virtually empty now aside from serial data modems on special equipment. Science tells us that the higher the frequency the faster data can travel however the longer the range the more the energy gets disappated. My grandpa's data device co. made wired systems for a coal mine's conveyor once and they had to run at 50Hz compared to their standard Mhz range systems since it was the only thing that could travel miles over copper wire without an amp to boost the signal. Yes it was slow but it consumed low power and ran long range. However to transmit On/Off and speed commands plus diagnostics for an automated conveyor system it worked quite well.

    The higher the frequency the higher the data rate, in order to match range of older systems we have to consume more power for amps/rebroadcasters. Technically speaking different data types are not suppose to occupy the same frequencies or at least have encryption/encoding to help filter out interference.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by BabyKitty View Post
    900Mhz spread spectrum man, I actually get twice the range with our kitchen phone over the rest of the 5.8Ghz phones.
    It's worth noting that US folks can only use the 900Mhz spectrum. Because in europe, 900Mhz is used for GSM cell phones and isn't license free.




    Quote Originally Posted by BabyKitty View Post
    Science tells us that the higher the frequency the faster data can travel however the longer the range the more the energy gets disappated.
    I think you mean, the higher the bandwidth (i.e. the spectrum we are given) the higher the data transfer rate is. The propogation time isn't something to worry about on short distance wireless communications.

    Not 100% sure on the power issue there. You emmit say 15mw, not how many photons a second. Sure the photons have more energy, but you emit less because of that.
    The only thing I know about the Carrier so far, is how well it propgates through the enviroment. You're signal may hit a brick wall, but does it get absorbed or does it bounce? Then you'll have the advantages/issues of multipath. Kind of like an echo, more power at the receiving end. But it can be very distorted.




    Quote Originally Posted by BabyKitty View Post
    The higher the frequency the higher the data rate [...]
    Getting there, the higher the Carrier Frequency, typically the wider that band is. (i.e. they give you more spectrum to play about it), thus, you can make use of that spectrum to acheive faster data rates.


    As for the phone issue on hand. I have no idea what cordless phones are like. I just hear that the 5Ghz band isn't as "full" as it's sister 2.4Ghz, But that's mostly what I hear about wireless networks anyway. If your phone is on 5.8Ghz, Then it is sharing the same band as you n network. Because it should be written as 5.8Ghz, as that's the only ISM band that exists near 5.
    It's all to do with Power I guess. Sure you can use it half way down the street, that means your phone and base station are emmiting allot of power just to work. For for your wireless network, This power is considered noise. And with your phone in use, there is allot of it.

    So your SNR drops to a point where the network can't work unless you eleminate the noise. Also it's worth noting. The the network is also noise for your phone too. They are trying to compete against eachother. My advice is to buy a new phone that isn't sharing the same band. And don't get 2.4GHz either.

  7. #7

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    Well think of what the speed difference is between a 900MHz processor compared to that of a 5GHz one, the speed quoted os the number or times the transistors can switch on and of per second this doesn't necessarily mean that it will operate 5.5 times faster or to 5.5 times as many things.

    Just as in this case 900Mhz is the number of waves produced each second as is 5GHz, but just because there a 5.5 more waves per second produced doesn't mean that it can carry 5.5 nor can it travel 5.5 times further. In an open environment yes the increase in frequency near as makes no difference in the distance it travels, but as there are walls and appliances (such as microwaves) can reduce that distance. Your best bet would to be to get a router with an integrated phone or buy a new phone but check what frequency it operated on

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by audio file View Post
    do any of you guys have any problems with interference from cordless phones on an 802.11n network(5GHz)
    I did several years ago in the 'b' era with some older 2.4GHz phones. Can't say I've had the issue though for a great while.

  9. #9

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    I'm trying to get my folks to get some 1.9GHz phones but it won't be cheap with 7 handsets and 1 base to replace so I might be relying on the 2.4Ghz spectrum for the network for a while

  10. #10

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    Have you tried changing the channels of your router? The default is 11, change that may help and also reduce chances of interference with other networks.

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