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Thread: A different catheter question

  1. #1

    Default A different catheter question

    Some people claim to have been cathed long term with little or no UTI's. I am the opposite, if I even look at a catheter I get sepsis. For those who are immune, what does your sugar/carbohydrate intake look like? See, I've been on a ketogenic diet for a month now, and basically consume almost no carbs. So my theory is this: bacteria like to eat sugar mostly, and if you eat no carbs, they should be less likely to thrive and migrate to the bladder. What do you guys think, and what are your personal observations with your carb intake vs. UTI's?

    I'm asking because I'm considering trying them again while on a keto diet if indeed it will be safer. I'm not saying I will, just throwing this idea out to see if it resonates or not.

    Edit: I did some research, and there are a few studies on keto diet for treatment of uti's going back as far as 1936. While the diet does seem rather good at curing/preventing uti, they proposed it was due to lowering the ph, and the presence of ketone bodies. I also found a lot of anecdotal comments on the keto forums where people confirm this.
    Last edited by MarcusP; 04-Nov-2018 at 17:04.

  2. #2

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    The diet industry in this country has an 80% failure rate. Failure to reach the goal, and or failure to maintain the weight loss for the long term. EVERY so called "Diet" out there is fundamentally flawed in it's own way. Common sense and will power is the only "Diet" you should follow.

    Only four words will really help you: "EAT RIGHT AND EXERCISE". Period. Everything else is a failure from the start. The police would break in and instruct you to,... "Put the fork down and take three steps back from the buffet."

    Balance your food intake with daily exercise and things will most likely take care of themselves.

  3. #3

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    I've been self-cathing for over three years, 2-8 times a day (depends on symptoms), and I've had one documented UTI and three that were possible - they didn't find bacteria in my urine but put me on antibiotics just to be safe. So yeah, I've got a good track record.

    My does is mostly eating whatever appeals. I'm moderately overweight but in fairly good cardiovascular health because of an active job that involves lots of walking most days, and I'm not trying hard to lose weight.

    My carb intake is quite high - I tend to snack on crackers at work, I eat fries and bread regularly, and I generally don't make any effort to limit carbs.

    I don't think a high carb or low carb diet is going to make a big difference in your UTI rate. If you're using a Foley, keep your urethral opening clean, use a lidocaine ointment to keep the catheter lubed to prevent urethral trauma (I had to get my doctor to hunt for this - she wasn't aware of the ointment, just the gel that dries out almost immediately). If you're doing ISC, be sure to use a prep pad to clean your urethral opening (my doc suggests alcohol pads because they're cheap, but betadine is more traditional) and be sure your using a good clean technique and a hydrophilic (self-lubricating) catheter. I like the Lofric Origo, since it gets slippery faster than others and had plenty of water in the packet to activate all the hydrophilic coating, which some others don't. Finally, make sure you're using a new catheter every time - trying to clean and reuse catheters is no longer considered the standard of care, and is an invitation to getting UTIs.

  4. #4

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    I'm one of those who have had to use indwelling folley catheters way too often. In over 20 years of on/off use I have never once gotten sick from a uti (though urine tests did indicate I had an asymptomatic uti for a little over 3 years straight).

    I maintain a well ballanced diet, eat extremely little surgar, fat, and only a moderate amount of bread. I also stay away from milk (due to gout), and most anything processed. I do take in loads of probiotics (look into Keifer), and eat moderate amounts of red and white meat, fish, and poultry. Though with any meat I make sure to cut off any fat and only eat very lean meat. Oh, and while cathed, I highly recommend at least 8oz of cranberry juice per day (or cranberry pills).

    More than your diet though, you need to be very clean when inserting a catheter. Regular non-antibacterial soap is best, just get every inch of your hands, your penis, AND any work surfaces too. And never, never, reuse any catheter.

    I also very highly recommend lidocaine ointment, not lidocaine gel. The gel dries sticky in about 10 minutes, the ointment last an hour or more. Also make sure to stay extremely well hydrated. That's the world health organizations recommendation of no less than 64 oz (nearly 2 liters) of liquid per day, more depending on varying conditions. Constant flushing of the bladder is the absolute best way to avoid uti's.

    I personally didn't care for the hydrophillic catheters myself though. Yes they are better and slippery when inserting them, but after a few days that coating is lost and the latex is exposed. Of which, I found latex will also gets a little sticky. Red rubber is the worst of all too (rubber is literally made to stick, like with tires and sealing rings after all) I personally recommend 100% silicone, which stays smooth the entire month you can have them in place.

    As I've also mentioned before, letting a catheter drain into a diaper makes little difference for infections. However, this is with the caveat you stay well hydrated, and change often (about every 8 hours at least). My last three urologist all agreed having an open catheter like this is ok, as long as you don't get stupid or dirty about it. Oh, and pools and oceans are off limits unless you cap the catheter to temporarily seal it off, or otherwise attach a bag so it becomes a sealed system.

    And if after all of that you still have infection problems, then you're unfortunately just one of thos people who are prone to getting infection no latter what. Luckily there is one last trick you can try. Get a prescription for silver coated catheters. The do wonders for fighting infections, but as you fan guess they are much more expensive too. Insurance hats paying for them because of that, but you and your doctor can get them to relent when it's "medically necessary". Good luck.

  5. #5

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    I have been using intermittent self catheters since 2012 and in that time I've had maybe three UTI's that needed antibiotics. before cathing it was 3 or 4 a year. All of those post-cathing UTIs were within the first 2 years. I don't restrict my carb intake in any way. Pasta, bread, rice, potatoes, bring them on. Especially the potatoes.

    I attribute my track record to two things. First, scrupulous hygiene when cathing. Wash hands, use antibacterial gel/wipes. Second, the catheter I use is the Hollister Vapro, which is completely enclosed in a sterile plastic sleeve. I swear, this should be the mandatory standard for urinary catheters. I can't recommend them highly enough. 100/10.

  6. #6

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    I use the Wellspec Lofric Origo, which is similar to the Hollister. I second your recommendations - good hygeine and an easy-to-use catheter make a huge difference.

    I have had one UTI since I've been cathing regularly, and that was acquired week I was hospitalized and on long-term broad spectrum antibiotics for a biliary infection. I ended up with ESBL-producing E. coli, which is antibiotic-resistant and resulted in an extra well in the hospital getting IV antibiotics. Not fun, but staying out of the hospital avoids a lot of potential for infection. I probably touched something contaminated and wasn't fastidious enough about washing my hands.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by ltaluv View Post
    I use the Wellspec Lofric Origo, which is similar to the Hollister. I second your recommendations - good hygeine and an easy-to-use catheter make a huge difference.

    I have had one UTI since I've been cathing regularly, and that was acquired week I was hospitalized and on long-term broad spectrum antibiotics for a biliary infection. I ended up with ESBL-producing E. coli, which is antibiotic-resistant and resulted in an extra well in the hospital getting IV antibiotics. Not fun, but staying out of the hospital avoids a lot of potential for infection. I probably touched something contaminated and wasn't fastidious enough about washing my hands.
    Seconded on the hospital uti risk. I don't have numbers, but I'd swear any person is more likely to get a uti when a catheter is inserted in the cleanest hospital then they are with inserting it themselves while in the dirtiest bathroom at their own house. My theory being there are some pretty nasty bugs in hospitals waiting to catch us off guard, but we're already used to the more mild ones in our own bathrooms.

  8. #8

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    What I found help while self Cathing is make sure your taps are clean I moved into a flat where I had numerous UTI after self Cathing after checking the inside of the taps I steam clean regularly and UTI have calmed down also when out in public toilets I carry some water to use instead of using taps in public toilets

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