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Thread: I Don't Think White People Will Ever Understand Racism (And That's Not A Bad Thing)

  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by PuppyLover View Post
    The problem is that black people who wear dreadlocks look dirty and unprofessional on a black person, but empowering and beautiful on a white person..
    You sure you're not the one discriminating here?

    On topic, cultural appropriation is a thing but it's not a bad thing. You'll never see me get mad at anyone for getting your foreskin chopped off without inviting all your friends and family to watch.

    It's cultural MIS-appropriation that's bad, and even then it's usually not THAT bad. There are some egregious examples, but by and large it's just innocent ignorance. We live in a global world, not everyone's gonna study your culture before wearing your clothes. Take it as a compliment as long as they're not doing it to mock you or your culture.

  2. #22

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    I still wouldn't call it appropriation, since we are experiencing the culture rather than using it as our own, and cultural misrepresentation (not mis-appropriation) happens all too frequently unfortunatly, take Pokémon for example with the English dub and the Rice balls.



    It has become something of a meme.

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by SgtOddball View Post
    So you don't actually know what appropriation is?
    You're the one who seems confused. I did ask, but you were unable to explain what you thought it meant.



    Quote Originally Posted by SgtOddball View Post
    But no it isn't in anyway appropriating culture.
    Why not? Do you understand what "appropriation" means? Do you realise how different the food served in most Indian restaurants in Britain is to the food that Indians typically eat?



    Quote Originally Posted by SgtOddball View Post
    But welcome to the world of Multiculturalism, since you seem to be new to the idea.
    You're the one who seems baffled by the idea of culture, and how different peoples appropriate each others' culture. That is how multiculturalism works. You should try going abroad. It would blow your mind to see how other cultures live.

    - - - Updated - - -



    Quote Originally Posted by Orange View Post
    On topic, cultural appropriation is a thing but it's not a bad thing...

    It's cultural MIS-appropriation that's bad, and even then it's usually not THAT bad. There are some egregious examples, but by and large it's just innocent ignorance. We live in a global world, not everyone's gonna study your culture before wearing your clothes. Take it as a compliment as long as they're not doing it to mock you or your culture.
    I couldn't agree more!

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by tiny View Post
    You're the one who seems confused. I did ask, but you were unable to explain what you thought it meant.



    Why not? Do you understand what "appropriation" means? Do you realise how different the food served in most Indian restaurants in Britain is to the food that Indians typically eat?



    You're the one who seems baffled by the idea of culture, and how different peoples appropriate each others' culture. That is how multiculturalism works. You should try going abroad. It would blow your mind to see how other cultures live.

    - - - Updated - - -



    I couldn't agree more!
    I am not in the slightest confused, and rather I'm asking you for the explanation as to what you think it meant since you think you're an expert on the matter.

    Yes, I do know what Appropriation is, and Tikka Masala is not that, nor is having dreadlocks in your hair. And hell, if they were appropriation then language would also be appropriation, but we simply don't have that kind of Logic now do we? Because by eating a Tikka Masala, a Taco or even a Stir Fry doesn't automatically mean you are attempting to make that culture yours, hell most Brit's don't consider Tikka Masala to be a British Dish despite its popularity, American's don't claim they invented Egg Fried Rice, and there are so many cultures out there that have Dreadlocks that you simply cannot claim someone is appropriating *insert_culture_here* just by having them. It is this kind of petty behaviour and the misuse of the word Appropriation which is what puts society down.

    I am not at all baffled my friend on the idea of culture and no, multiculturalism is about the sharing and experience of culture, not its appropriation, again you have shown an utter lack of understanding of what appropriation actually is. And I have been to at least 1 other Country in Europe, Hungary, and would certainly love to visit and experience other countries in my life time, however that requires this magical thing called money.


    Also since you obviously don't know what Cultural Appropriation actually is, the Appropriation of Culture is the Assimilation of that Culture into your own, and since these days no one is doing that, we simply cannot call it cultural appropriation.
    Last edited by SgtOddball; 1 Day Ago at 19:03.

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by SgtOddball View Post
    I still wouldn't call it appropriation, since we are experiencing the culture rather than using it as our own, and cultural misrepresentation (not mis-appropriation) happens all too frequently unfortunatly, take Pokémon for example with the English dub and the Rice balls.



    It has become something of a meme.
    Dunno what example in my post you're talking about, but I feel like we're talking about the same concept with minor semantic differences. However, circumcision has definitely become part of the wider culture, but y'all can have that. If you're talking about clothes, eh. You're right where one-off incidents aren't appropriation but then you've got people whose entire wardrobes are attempts to look like another culture. (Looking at you weebs and wangstas) That's cultural appropriation as well as usually being cultural misrepresentation. I live in an super white area and the percentage of white suburban kids who dress like gangstas and drop the n-word, say shit like "Ayo I finna get lit tonight my n----a" in an attempt to look cool is huge. Gets my goat, man and I can be a dick about it. Like I dunno how to tell you this without hurting you deeply but you're not black. You're fucking great-plains scandanavian, grandparents are farmers, lutheran church sunday school educated, lacrosse playing, 3000sqft house in the suburbs and barbecue with the cop next door white and when you act like the parody of a black man because that's how you *think* from black people from Englewood act you're not only showing that you have a deeply stereotypical view of black culture but are convincing nobody of your so-called "street cred" and just making yourself look like a goddamn fool.

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Orange View Post
    Dunno what example in my post you're talking about, but I feel like we're talking about the same concept with minor semantic differences. However, circumcision has definitely become part of the wider culture, but y'all can have that. If you're talking about clothes, eh. You're right where one-off incidents aren't appropriation but then you've got people whose entire wardrobes are attempts to look like another culture. (Looking at you weebs and wangstas) That's cultural appropriation as well as usually being cultural misrepresentation. I live in an super white area and the percentage of white suburban kids who dress like gangstas and drop the n-word, say shit like "Ayo I finna get lit tonight my n----a" in an attempt to look cool is huge. Gets my goat, man and I can be a dick about it. Like I dunno how to tell you this without hurting you deeply but you're not black. You're fucking great-plains scandanavian, grandparents are farmers, lutheran church sunday school educated, lacrosse playing, 3000sqft house in the suburbs and barbecue with the cop next door white and when you act like the parody of a black man because that's how you *think* from black people from Englewood act you're not only showing that you have a deeply stereotypical view of black culture but are convincing nobody of your so-called "street cred" and just making yourself look like a goddamn fool.
    You do get people like that, but I wouldn't exactly say it is a "Black" culture thing, but rather the Ghetto sort of lifestyle, not appropriation just lack of education. However I'm certainly not that nor a weeb, my interest in Japanese culture doesn't stem to me pretending to be Japanese at all.

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by SgtOddball View Post
    You do get people like that, but I wouldn't exactly say it is a "Black" culture thing, but rather the Ghetto sort of lifestyle, not appropriation just lack of education.
    If its not a black thing how would you explain them mimicing ebonics and dropping the n-word at the end of every sentence? What you call the ghetto lifestyle is inherently intertwined with black culture in the minds of a large portion of today's youth and today like so many times in the past the aesthetic features and social signifiers of adversity, poverty and historically oppressed cultures is not only commercialized and marketed but adapted as not much more than a fashion trend by youth. Now this has happened time and time again and is an insipid if largely harmless process unless taken to extremes, but the extremes are what I present to you. Lack of education can contribute but I don't think you can't point to it as the primary animus, you think the people I so lovingly described went to bad schools? Shit. My own high school was the most ghetto one in the city and we had the least number of those fools but it cuts across income brackets. They become a grotesque parody of the culture currently in fashion and distort society's views of that culture, primarily those from without but also from within. A similar, if extreme, example can be found in Mickey Rooney's portrayal of a Japanese man in Breakfast at Tiffany's. In the example at hand, black fashion has been distorted, associated with poverty, gangsterism and ignorance to some when worn by members of the originating community but as fashionable when worn by those outside of it as a direct outcome of the aforementioned process, because while one is representing a culture on a superficial level, the other is the genuine article and the one shouldering the burden of that misrepresentation. This is what I mean by cultural appropriation-- when the prevalence of one culture's totems as a fashion trend among others has attached a false significance and in this case a virulent stigma to integral parts of the originating culture and while it is not the sole causative mechanism at play, it is a significant one. You need only look as far as the OP to see a particularly stark example of the consequences:


    Quote Originally Posted by PuppyLover View Post
    The problem is that black people who wear dreadlocks look dirty and unprofessional on a black person, but empowering and beautiful on a white person..
    And as a counterpoint to the OP's statement, I'd like to enter this picture of Jessica Williams and this picture of Zazie Beetz into evidence. (EDIT: And one more picture I found while looking for Zazie with dreads for good measure. Oof.)



    Quote Originally Posted by SgtOddball View Post
    However I'm certainly not that nor a weeb, my interest in Japanese culture doesn't stem to me pretending to be Japanese at all.
    Never said you were, but that's not the same for everyone. There's people out here who want plastic surgery to add epicanthic folds.
    Last edited by Orange; 1 Day Ago at 23:56.

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Orange View Post
    If its not a black thing how would you explain them mimicing ebonics and dropping the n-word at the end of every sentence? What you call the ghetto lifestyle is inherently intertwined with black culture in the minds of a large portion of today's youth and today like so many times in the past the aesthetic features and social signifiers of adversity, poverty and historically oppressed cultures is not only commercialized and marketed but adapted as not much more than a fashion trend by youth. Now this has happened time and time again and is an insipid if largely harmless process unless taken to extremes, but the extremes are what I present to you. Lack of education can contribute but I don't think you can't point to it as the primary animus, you think the people I so lovingly described went to bad schools? Shit. My own high school was the most ghetto one in the city and we had the least number of those fools but it cuts across income brackets. They become a grotesque parody of the culture currently in fashion and distort society's views of that culture, primarily those from without but also from within. A similar, if extreme, example can be found in Mickey Rooney's portrayal of a Japanese man in Breakfast at Tiffany's. In the example at hand, black fashion has been distorted, associated with poverty, gangsterism and ignorance to some when worn by members of the originating community but as fashionable when worn by those outside of it as a direct outcome of the aforementioned process, because while one is representing a culture on a superficial level, the other is the genuine article and the one shouldering the burden of that misrepresentation. This is what I mean by cultural appropriation-- when the prevalence of one culture's totems as a fashion trend among others has attached a false significance and in this case a virulent stigma to integral parts of the originating culture and while it is not the sole causative mechanism at play, it is a significant one. You need only look as far as the OP to see a particularly stark example of the consequences:


    And as a counterpoint to the OP's statement, I'd like to enter this picture of Jessica Williams and this picture of Zazie Beetz into evidence. (EDIT: And one more picture I found while looking for Zazie with dreads for good measure. Oof.)



    Never said you were, but that's not the same for everyone. There's people out here who want plastic surgery to add epicanthic folds.
    That is what it is though, it isn't exactly a Black Culture thing, yes it is used by the majority of blacks and minority of whites, but on both sides of the fence the primary animus is education, and these days it isn't about which side is the most oppressed. And even coming from a Black the N---- Word makes them socially repulsive and it is also these types that are empirically more likely to commit crime.

    However stereotypes will always exist, it isn't just limited to black communities but also communities which are working or middle class. I mean just look at alot of American or British Dramas about dysfunctional families, like Malcolm in the Middle for example (granted this is meant as a Comedy I think but you get my point). Also what would you describe as Black Fashion? If you mention Dreadlocks then I'll have to point out to you that it isn't just associated with Black Culture, since it was prevalent in other cultures as well across Africa, Asia and the Americas. But again it isn't at all an aspect I'd consider black culture, as it isn't something unique to that culture. But you will find the minority of people will use those 3 stereotypes you mentioned for members of the Black community because they are afraid of approaching those that are different than themselves which unfortunately stems from their own ignorance of the situation. At the end of the day however it isn't cultural appropriation.

    And your pics aren't really evidence of anything, since you are only taking one culture into account while forgetting it was used also by the Indians of the Americas and Tibetan Monks in Asia among others.
    Last edited by SgtOddball; 1 Day Ago at 12:34.

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