Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 20 of 20

Thread: Have humans forgotten about watching for traffic?

  1. #11
    Slomo

    Default

    When I'm ready to back out of a parking spot, I always let off the brake for a half second. This flashes my lights and moves my car back a few inches. It is a great way to alert pedestrians who migh otherwise walk in behind me from somewhere I can't see.

    This is still somewhat rare for me though, as I learned a long time ago to always back into parking spaces (unless they are angled spaces). It's much easier and safer backing into a space you already know is clear, than backing out blindly.

  2. #12
    Maxx

    Default

    Mrs. Maxx bought me an actioncam (same thing as a dash cam or gopro) for christmas a couple years ago. I usually have it mounted on my bike handlebar. It may make her very rich one day.

    There are very few true accidents. Collisions are caused by one or more people not paying attention or doing something unexpected..

    ****public service announcement****'
    Safety while navigating in public, whether on foot, on two wheels, or four comes down to three things.

    1. Be aware. Pay attention to what's going on around you. Whether walking, riding, or driving, the phone should be off. Diddling with your electronics trusts that everyone else around you is paying attention and will avoid you. What happens when two people phone diddle in the same place at the same time? The ipod zombies are nearly as bad. Listening to music distracts you from outside sensory inputs. Even if its not that loud, its using part of your brain's processing power and clock cycles, slowing your reaction time.

    2. Be visible. Lights and bright colors attract the eye. You'll notice a red car much sooner than a pavement colored one (gray, silver, tan, gold), giving you more time to react. Insurance statistics bear that out. Same goes for clothing if you're a pedestrian or cyclist. I wonder what commuters are thinking.... wandering into traffic from the train station, wearing dark clothing, faces buried in their phones. It's a miracle more of them aren't killed. Be aware of light conditions. Other vehicles driving into sunrise or sunset light may not be able to see you. Right of way or not, you have to take that into account.

    3. Be predictable. Be in a place where people expect to see something. Do what other people are expecting. Traffic laws are part of that...giving everyone a reasonable expectation of what the other guy is going to do.

    Stop at stop signs and red lights, signal your turns, ALL the time, EVERY time, even if you think nobody is around. It's about developing the good habits that can save you that one time when you didn't notice the other guy was there.

    STOP means coming to a full stop at the stop line, not in the middle of the crosswalk. If you vision of the intersection is obstructed, pull forward into the crosswalk AFTER coming to a full stop and AFTER checking that the crosswalk is clear.

    Right turn on red means coming to a FULL STOP at the stop line, then proceeding AFTER checking that the crosswalk and intersection is clear. You don't have an inalienable right to roll through a right on red. (pet peeve, can ya tell?) Cheating isn't going to save you enough time to make up for the risk of hitting somebody.

    SIGNAL your turns before starting the turn. The objective is to warn us of your intentions in time for us to react if we need to. After you've already hit the brakes, or worse started turning your steering wheel, it's too late and pointless. AGAIN... get in the habit of signalling even if you think nobody is around.

    SIGNAL before pulling out of a parallel parking space. If I'm on my bike, and you have tinted windows, I have no way of knowing you're there and intending to kill me if you don't signal.

    SPEED LIMITS have nothing to do with the quality of your vehicle or your self-perceived driving skill (no, you're not THAT good. How many trophies do you have?). They exist so the rest of us have a way to guage whether we have time to cross the street or enter an intersection.

    When you are a cyclist rather than a motor vehicle operator (most cyclists are both), you are required to follow the same traffic laws as motor vehicles (in the U.S., anyway). That means riding with traffic, stopping at red lights and stop signs, signalling turns. Yes, you can be ticketed for violations.

    P.S. Put the damn phone away.

    P.P.S. PUT THE DAMN PHONE AWAY. Despite what you think, you're not that good a driver to do both.

  3. #13

    Default

    I remember doing a written test and one of the questions was that a good driver never assumes and the answer was "that the car is going to stop at the stop sign." It's called defensive driving. Now it seems like this doesn't apply anymore. Even when a car pulls up quickly to the sign, I still automatically slow down because my brain thinks they are going to keep going. I do the same in parking lots too except I actually stop.

    The other day at my daughter's school, I am going to park my car and I turn into a lane and right a way a car starts backing out so I stop and the car continue s backing out. I think the unparked car has the right of way if I am correct here. But I stayed stopped because I was not going to smash my car into that car just because I had the right of way and then blame the driver.

  4. #14

    Default

    A good way to learn defensive driving skills is to ride a motorcycle. If you survive long enough defensive driving will be imbedded in your brain.

  5. #15
    Slomo

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by Maxx View Post
    Mrs. Maxx bought me an actioncam (same thing as a dash cam or gopro) for christmas a couple years ago. I usually have it mounted on my bike handlebar. It may make her very rich one day.

    There are very few true accidents. Collisions are caused by one or more people not paying attention or doing something unexpected..

    ****public service announcement****'
    Safety while navigating in public, whether on foot, on two wheels, or four comes down to three things.

    1. Be aware. Pay attention to what's going on around you. Whether walking, riding, or driving, the phone should be off. Diddling with your electronics trusts that everyone else around you is paying attention and will avoid you. What happens when two people phone diddle in the same place at the same time? The ipod zombies are nearly as bad. Listening to music distracts you from outside sensory inputs. Even if its not that loud, its using part of your brain's processing power and clock cycles, slowing your reaction time.

    2. Be visible. Lights and bright colors attract the eye. You'll notice a red car much sooner than a pavement colored one (gray, silver, tan, gold), giving you more time to react. Insurance statistics bear that out. Same goes for clothing if you're a pedestrian or cyclist. I wonder what commuters are thinking.... wandering into traffic from the train station, wearing dark clothing, faces buried in their phones. It's a miracle more of them aren't killed. Be aware of light conditions. Other vehicles driving into sunrise or sunset light may not be able to see you. Right of way or not, you have to take that into account.

    3. Be predictable. Be in a place where people expect to see something. Do what other people are expecting. Traffic laws are part of that...giving everyone a reasonable expectation of what the other guy is going to do.

    Stop at stop signs and red lights, signal your turns, ALL the time, EVERY time, even if you think nobody is around. It's about developing the good habits that can save you that one time when you didn't notice the other guy was there.

    STOP means coming to a full stop at the stop line, not in the middle of the crosswalk. If you vision of the intersection is obstructed, pull forward into the crosswalk AFTER coming to a full stop and AFTER checking that the crosswalk is clear.

    Right turn on red means coming to a FULL STOP at the stop line, then proceeding AFTER checking that the crosswalk and intersection is clear. You don't have an inalienable right to roll through a right on red. (pet peeve, can ya tell?) Cheating isn't going to save you enough time to make up for the risk of hitting somebody.

    SIGNAL your turns before starting the turn. The objective is to warn us of your intentions in time for us to react if we need to. After you've already hit the brakes, or worse started turning your steering wheel, it's too late and pointless. AGAIN... get in the habit of signalling even if you think nobody is around.

    SIGNAL before pulling out of a parallel parking space. If I'm on my bike, and you have tinted windows, I have no way of knowing you're there and intending to kill me if you don't signal.

    SPEED LIMITS have nothing to do with the quality of your vehicle or your self-perceived driving skill (no, you're not THAT good. How many trophies do you have?). They exist so the rest of us have a way to guage whether we have time to cross the street or enter an intersection.

    When you are a cyclist rather than a motor vehicle operator (most cyclists are both), you are required to follow the same traffic laws as motor vehicles (in the U.S., anyway). That means riding with traffic, stopping at red lights and stop signs, signalling turns. Yes, you can be ticketed for violations.

    P.S. Put the damn phone away.

    P.P.S. PUT THE DAMN PHONE AWAY. Despite what you think, you're not that good a driver to do both.
    Lol, I DO have a racing trophy! Well, I did till it broke some 10 years ago- cheap thing. I've also had extensive training too though, including a literal crash course. The trophy was for a derby for everyone after the course. I only came in second, but have since learned to drift better.

    I absolutely agree people need to never pick up a phone when driving. Just put it in your front pocket to make it really hard to take out in the first place.

  6. #16

    Default

    If you drive with the assumption that everyone around you is an idiot, you will be happier in the end.

  7. #17

    Default

    It's really really bad sometimes.

    I almost ran someone over about a year ago because he was wearing black and walking along a dark narrow country road that's too small for 2 cars passing by each other much less pedestrians.

    And another time some jerky teens were playing chicken or something jumping right up along moving cars then acting upset when they almost get hit. Well what did you expect?

  8. #18

  9. #19

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by Sheepies View Post
    It's really really bad sometimes.

    I almost ran someone over about a year ago because he was wearing black and walking along a dark narrow country road that's too small for 2 cars passing by each other much less pedestrians.

    And another time some jerky teens were playing chicken or something jumping right up along moving cars then acting upset when they almost get hit. Well what did you expect?
    I was driving home one day and there were these teens on the sidewalk, all of a sudden they both went onto the road and I started slowing down and then they got back on the sidewalk. There is no way I would have had time to stopped if they got in front of me. My reaction speed is seconds delayed. This was in broad daylight and I was going to speed limit. Plus I might have gotten rear ended if my reaction speed was quick enough. Then the driver behind me would have been held at fault but just imagine if different cars rear ended each other because of the first driver slamming on their breaks over a pedestrian jumping out on the road in front of them?

  10. #20

    Default

    Yesterday we were entering an intersection after the light turned green and a guy coming from the opposite direction turned in front of us. We honked our displeasure but he flipped us off in return.

Similar Threads

  1. Forgotten to put on diapers
    By Smurfen in forum Diaper Talk
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 10-Oct-2016, 03:21
  2. I Had Forgotten Just How Bad They Are
    By cm90210 in forum Diaper Talk
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 06-May-2016, 15:48
  3. I've forgotten how to play! :(
    By Penny in forum Adult Babies & Littles
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 25-Nov-2014, 12:52
  4. I have forgotten how to urinate
    By Valkyrie in forum Diaper Talk
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 07-Jan-2011, 17:14

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
ADISC.org - the Adult Baby / Diaper Lover / Incontinence Support Community.
ADISC.org is designed to be viewed in Firefox, with a resolution of at least 1280 x 1024.