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Thread: Best method to ensure diaper "compliance" in medical settings

  1. #1

    Lightbulb Best method to ensure diaper "compliance" in medical settings

    All my life, I've politely asked (even pleaded) for diapers, but the response is almost always the same. There are many posts where people try to figure out ways to convince medical staff to allow people like us to wear diapers so we can have our home comforts in a medical setting and many find its an uphill battle. Simply put, the world discriminates against us because we're stigmatized and/or others are conditioned to say "no" to something they don't understand. There have been many threads on how our mental need for these items of clothing are a medical necessity in and of themselves, just not for the exact purposes these "briefs" were originally designed for; in other words, adult briefs have an "off-label" treatment for anxiety relief. But this form of relief might not be in their "rule" books for quite some time. If we are to be a proper advocate for ourselves, slightly bending the truth in these circumstances is the only way we can maintain our right to have the "clothing" we desire in a medical setting. Most people wind up feeling nervous and scared in any medical setting - if this is not single most best place in the world to have a diaper to help, I don't know what is.

    With that said, the real reason you wind up in a medical facility will probably explain away just about any bedwetting/incontinence that might occur. The number one thing to remember about human nature is that if the staff discovers on their own that you need some type of protection and you kept your mouth shut the whole time, the situation is a lot more genuine and believable based on what they are used to.

    Don't ask for diapers, just wet yourself at a convenient time and ask for help (or let them figure it out on their own). This might be inconvenient, but wetting always imposes some sort of inconvenience. If a catheter is offered, respond that it has too many risks of infection. If a bed-pad is offered, they might see how well it floods the floor. If they keep changing the sheets without offering some type of protection, you might ask then or to bring in your own, but never before they've begun to take steps to help containment. If they arrive at this conclusion on their own, they are likely to take the stance of trying to get a diaper on you rather than what the rest of us have been battling for so long. Just turn the tables.

    So it takes some guts, but it also takes guts to ask for diapers, so take your pick. If you don't want temporary incontinence going on your record, don't do it. If you do this every time you enter a medical facility, then it might be easier to get what you need subsequent times. How you might do it is up to you and based on your situation. You can refuse any tests or discussing it with the doctor due to the embarrassment it would cause. The average non-diaper wearing person probably wouldn't want tests or discussion either if they just found out they had incontinence, so the staff probably won't push the issue too hard.

    God knows whatever they diaper you with, you'll pay for anyway. If your insurance is paying, you might not do any of this stuff.

    In fact, I have no experience with any of this whatsoever. This information is for discussion purposes only

  2. #2

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    I have been incontinent for 3 years, and have had to deal with wearing diapers 24/7 I have gone into the hospital for day surgery and there was no issue of me being diapered juring the surgery and recovery time. they may catheter you if you are in the table for a longer period. If you need diapers for a medical issue buy and wear diapers as for medical tests from an urologist yes they can be embarrassing but once they start and you realize they deal with lots of patients that also need diapers it becomes an every day event .

  3. #3

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    I haven’t been in hospital very often, but I’ve always found that the staff was very understanding and solicitous about my incontinence. What kind of medical facility are you in where things are different?

  4. #4

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    I've gone in for surgeries all over the place. If you show up in a diaper, they don't question the validity to you're needing them, or for what reason.

    If you're planning on a pronged stay while diapered the whole time (which I have also done), just wet the diaper whenever you need to go. They will provide you with cheap hospital diapers when they are requested.

    And no, the hospital is not going to insist on verifying your diaper needs while you are there for something else. That would just be insulting. Just say you need them, and leave it at that. If they pry, say it's personal and you'd rather not get into that. All true, by the way.

    So no. Do not lie, or pretend you didn't know you already have urinary incontinence. This right here would be way less believable than stating you need them right from the start. And being caught in a lie is what would warrant them needing to test you and verfy if you really do have incontinence. Don't do something like this, it is bad advice.

  5. #5

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    When I went to the hospital as teenager I had some mild incontinence when lying bed and as mentioned ur they kept providing me with pads. No questions asked.


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  6. #6

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    This thread was originally for people who were using diapers for anxiety without another medical condition. These people probably won't get cooperation from medical staff in many places but if you are footing the entire bill, you should be provided the comfort that would help relieve stress from a difficult situation.

    If you already have an underlying condition (as I do) then I surely wouldn't recommend going in without some form of protection. Sorry for not making that clear earlier. I have been bothered by seeing all the posts where people are given a hard time by medical professionals whether or not they had incontinence. Especially one post where one doctor asks, "What's with the diaper?"

    Keep in mind if your medical chart, dr. records, etc. contains nothing about your incontinence and you end up in a medical facility with difficult staff, they might need some convincing beyond taking your word. If at any point you feel the resistance they are putting up is close to begging, just let loose!

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by jellyjigger View Post
    This thread was originally for people who were using diapers for anxiety without another medical condition. These people probably won't get cooperation from medical staff in many places but if you are footing the entire bill, you should be provided the comfort that would help relieve stress from a difficult situation.
    Then, why is it in this section?


    Quote Originally Posted by jellyjigger View Post
    . . . I have been bothered by seeing all the posts where people are given a hard time by medical professionals whether or not they had incontinence. Especially one post where one doctor asks, "What's with the diaper?
    I ached for that poor ADISCer, too, but, that's when you say, "Piss, and, for all you know,, jerk," and file a complaint! Bring your own, keep 'em all white, and they won't say.b
    Last edited by SpAzpieSweeTot; 07-Oct-2017 at 17:31.

  8. #8

  9. #9

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    Ive been IC for many years but my urologist is affiliated with a different hospital network so there is nothing really in my chart about it .

    But having shown up unconscious and oblivious to the world , when they undress me they find my diaper and just continue changing me until I return to my senses , as the chart says incontinent or + positive for excess moisture. So although my bowel a bladder care routine hasn't been official sanctioned by a Dr. On staff at that hospital never have I not been happily changed .

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  10. #10

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    I wrote in another thread about a recent experience I had with outpatient surgery. I had similar concerns - about how the staff would relate with diapers... The long and the short of it is that a couple years ago I had a bout with bed wetting related to sleep apnea; it was in my charts and so the person doing the surgery intake told me without drama to wear my normal night-time diapers for the surgery. I was taken too off guard to correct her that it was no longer a current issue per se. However, the more I thought about it, the more I thought it was a good idea because the bed wetting is still an issue when Iím drugged at home, and also, I prefer diapers as a stress reducer.
    Anyways, I had a diaper on under my hospital gown when I went in for surgery, and I came back out of surgery with it on ó wet. No one said anything about it. It wasnít any big drama or seeming concern. IDK. In my other experience with staying in a hospital, a few years ago, the bed wetting was a current problem back then. And that time as well, the intake people told me to bring my own bed wetting supplies from home and that I should just wear them in the hospital. Again, no one gave me any hassle about it. (Of course, in both situations, I tried to act as ďnormalĒ and discrete as possible ó as perhaps someone who purely only needed diapers might, instead of someone who both needed and LIKEs them).

    Iíve heard a lot of conversations on here about how hospital staff discourage diaper usage or dont allow it - but so far in my limited experiences, that hasnít been the case.


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