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Thread: Municipal Bylaws Make Halloween Scary!

  1. #1

    Default Municipal Bylaws Make Halloween Scary!

    Heard this story this morning about a city council trying to ruin Halloween.

    Bathurst, a city in New Brunswick, Canada, has revised it's municipal bylaws for Halloween. The new bylaw bans kids over the age of sixteen from trick or treating. In addition, there will be an 8 p.m. curfew. Anyone caught wearing a mask after the curfew, or anyone over the age of sixteen caught trick or treating can be charged with committing an illegal act and fined up to $200.

    http://www.torontosun.com/2017/09/19...lloween-curfew

    In spite of the absurdity of the bylaw, it actually eases the restrictions of the former bylaw, which set the curfew at 7 p.m. and restricted kids over the age of fourteen from trick or treating.

    Are they under the assumption the police won't have anything better to do than enforce such asinine laws?

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by Starrunner View Post
    Heard this story this morning about a city council trying to ruin Halloween.

    Bathurst, a city in New Brunswick, Canada, has revised it's municipal bylaws for Halloween. The new bylaw bans kids over the age of sixteen from trick or treating. In addition, there will be an 8 p.m. curfew. Anyone caught wearing a mask after the curfew, or anyone over the age of sixteen caught trick or treating can be charged with committing an illegal act and fined up to $200.

    http://www.torontosun.com/2017/09/19...lloween-curfew

    In spite of the absurdity of the bylaw, it actually eases the restrictions of the former bylaw, which set the curfew at 7 p.m. and restricted kids over the age of fourteen from trick or treating.

    Are they under the assumption the police won't have anything better to do than enforce such asinine laws?
    It's a by-law, meaning it is not an ACTUAL law. Does that mean you can ignore It? Not really. Usually a home owners association creates this and is in charge of enforcing it. They can levy the charges but have no legal means to collect aside from putting a lean on the home of the offender. Any dispute would be held in civil not criminal court.

    My thoughts: someone with too much time on their hands decided to force their will on the neighborhood and make people do what they wanted. Little Napoleon complex going on. HOAs in America have way too much autbority and power.

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  3. #3

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    Yes, let's deter otherwise bored teenagers/young adults from doing something harmless like trick-or-treating. If I rolled my eyes any higher, they'd fall out of my head.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bladderbrain View Post
    It's a by-law, meaning it is not an ACTUAL law. Does that mean you can ignore It? Not really. Usually a home owners association creates this and is in charge of enforcing it. They can levy the charges but have no legal means to collect aside from putting a lean on the home of the offender. Any dispute would be held in civil not criminal court.

    My thoughts: someone with too much time on their hands decided to force their will on the neighborhood and make people do what they wanted. Little Napoleon complex going on. HOAs in America have way too much autbority and power.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk
    Bylaws are usually voted upon by municipal councils. Bylaw officers are hired by thecity to enforce them. Here in Ottawa, we have municial property standards, noise, and animal bylaws which regulate activities to ensure the peace and and enjoyment of the community. Any person can call the city through a central intake number and equest a bylaw inspector to investigate complaints. If the complaint has merit, the offender can face a warning, fine or stronger sanctions after eepeated violations. If someone refuses to pay the fine, they can have their case heard in divisional court to appeal the decision. If an offender refuses to pay a fine, the city can normally claim it through property taxes and add a surcharge to it.

    The link below takes you to the bylaws in force in the City of Bathurst, which is the subject of this thread. Scroll down til you get to the bylaw relatiing to Halloween. This is where the city has the authority to issue fines or harsher sentences on the specific bylaw.

    http://www.bathurst.ca/bylaws.php

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bladderbrain View Post
    It's a by-law, meaning it is not an ACTUAL law.
    Maybe it's different in the US, but here in the UK, a bylaw is an actual law that is passed by a local authority under the terms permitted by an Act of parliament.

    In urban and semi-urban areas here, you get the occasional older-teen using the excuse of a fancy-dress and trick-or-treating to intimidate people and justify begging. So it seems reasonable that 14+ or 16+ year-olds don't go trick-or-treating -- it's something for little kids who like sweeties, isn't it?

    The one thing I find very disturbing, however, is that formally banning adults from trick-or-treating means that children will legally have to go out unaccompanied! Kids should always be accompanied by an adult when trick-or-treating, so it looks like a pretty dangerous bylaw.

    It sounds like the safety of children is being put in jeopardy for the sake of the safety of homeowners.

  6. #6

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    It reminds me of what they are doing to Halloween here , to cut down on "problems" every city town or hamlet has different days and different hours where trick or treating is allowed. You can't tell me putting on mask and getting a carton of eggs or case of TP is so hard for those with bad intentions, to take the show on the road every night of official Halloween from place to place, it just shows that politicians are over payed and have too little important public service to do !that they have time to craft these ridiculous ordinances and laws that don't accomplish anything other than put money in the general fund for anyone "caught" its another form of official corruption for fun & profit by preying on the public .

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  7. #7

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    Here in Lynchburg, we have a law putting a ceiling on the age one can participate in trick or treating. That doesn't mean that parents can't accompany younger children, because they aren't trick or treating, their child is. The problem with Halloween is that some youth and adults, use it as an opportunity to cause property damage. We don't have a curfew time, but I suspect that if an older youth was out late at night, a police officer might ask them what they were doing and send them home.

    When I was around 9 to 11 in age, I lived in a very small, bayside community, isolated from the rest of the world, and trick or treating there was an exciting experience for a little kid. My best friend and I had a great time, walking at night with our flashlights and hitting the houses for candy. Ah....good times.

  8. #8

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    I dunno, as a grumpy jaded adult I'd be all for that if they did it here.

    Past a certain age, it's kinda ridiculous to be out trick-or-treating, always feels weird handing out candy to someone who can legally drive a car... and it would be nice not to have the ambitious kids still showing up at like 9 or 10pm.

  9. #9

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    We don't call them bylaws in the US. We just call them "ordinances."

    Bylaws are actual laws. The term By is from the Norse just meaning "town."

  10. #10

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    Regardless of the definition, I wish our community had such laws. We literally get over 500 kids at our house and some are obviously way too old (imo) to be trick or treating. They're taller than us , have facial hair and some look intimidating. Some don't even wear a costume! Then we have kids that come back twice (one time three times) and kids will keep coming until we run out if candy. They start as early as 5 PM and will go well past 9. My wife is too nice to limit candy to say 300 pieces so we keep going... We do like seeing the little kids all dressed up in their cute costumes. But then we have moms brining babies up to 1 year old or so trick or treating. Obviously you don't give candy to a baby so it's for the parent? Please! Rant over.

    Side note 1: I always wonder if the teens dressing as ABs actually do it at home.

    Side note 2: What will be the most popular costume this year? I suspect a lot of Wonder Woman and clowns.

    - - - Updated - - -



    Quote Originally Posted by dogboy View Post
    Here in Lynchburg...
    Where they make Jack Daniels?

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