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Thread: "My Black is Beautiful" Proctor and Gamble Campaign

  1. #1

    Default "My Black is Beautiful" Proctor and Gamble Campaign

    I was wondering if anyone has seen the campaign by Proctor and Gamble called "My Black is Beautiful. " It released a two-minute video called "The Talk" which includes the conversations most Black parents have with their children concerning racial bias and prejudice. The purpose of the talk is to prepare, protect and encourage their children as they enter the real world for what they may encounter later in life.




    The video has raised a considerable amount of controversy amongst conservative white groups but also social justice groups with its message that discrimination is inevitable and that police officers are the enemy.

    One scene in particular shows a suburban Black mother in a car with her daughter who is a new driver. "When you get pulled over" she starts to tell her. Not "if" but "when." The daughter laughs it off by saying she is a good driver. The mother gravely warns her that "This is not about you getting a ticket. It's about you not coming home." Certainly there is justifed reasoning to be worried over the disproportionate number of Blacks shot by police and racial profiling, however, I do question the sweeping generalizations that all police officers are targeting Blacks and they should all be feared. At a time when race relations between Blacks and law enforcement officers is strained, P&G's message is that police must be feared and avoided at all costs by the Black community.

    Yes, it's important that parents of all races and minorities expose their children to the reality of the world, and to the reality that there are still people who will judge them by the colour of their skin or socio-economic status, rather than their character. In that respect, I think this is an excellent video. I do think, however, that if we truly value inclusiveness and diversity, that we must choose to work towards building bridges with the groups that have caused harm, and not build more distrust by reinforcing fear. My concern is that this approach causes division at a time when relations between police and the Black community are already heightened and that this reinforces building more walls instead of bridges. Perhaps if they had a second part of the campaign that offered encouragement to strengthen communication between the Black community and the police, to develop appropriate responses to arising issues, and serve as a vehicle to understand and defuse causes of tension, it could help serve to unite these groups.

    The campaign has been met with both praise and outrage.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.bce264544bbd

    Would love to hear everyone's thoughts on this.
    Last edited by Starrunner; 08-Aug-2017 at 13:46.

  2. #2

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    Although I am considered part of the majority based on my fair skin, and I am somewhat conservative, I hold the African American population in the highest regard. I grew up with a African American family living right next door to us. We never quarreled, never exchanged words of condemnation or hurtful racial slurs. We were friends and neighbors for 5+ years and we treated each other with the upmost respect. They were one of many cultured families among the African American population who put their principles above going with the crowd.

    I believe that every minority has an opportunity to deny their stereotypes by encouraging others of their group to stray away from the practices that are considered stereotypes for their specific groups. Such selfless actions for the good of their community would help improve the situation for all African Americans. In every generation of African Americans there is a small minority among them who want to behave like the stereotypes. This increases the attention of other groups towards their children and their adolescents/teens who behave in this fashion and the trend carries on throughout the generations.

    Although the culture of the African American community I have no quarrel with, I do have objections in that most rappers today who are from this group of people tend to use more and more profanity towards other ethnic groups and even the authority figures, like policemen, that already hold African Americans under prejudice from statistics gathered each year by the National Crime Report Organization. These statistics tell of a portion of uncontrolled (who have not received proper moral and behavioral instruction from the parents) African American Youth and Young Adults who commit crimes and sometimes become a recidivist on said crimes after being released. Although a portion of this statistic is from false convictions or forced confessions through police malpractice, the evidence for the malpractice is seldom admitted into trial because the majority in power (Conservative White People) do not want to admit fault to prejudice crimes committed by law enforcement officers (especially in the American South). Because of this, the fact that crime is up in the African American populations and neighborhoods can be caused by one of three things; gang related crimes (pertaining to the broken windows theory of criminal justice) where crimes are committed in the poorer parts of town, extremely prejudiced racial profiling by law enforcement (which may cause more arrests of African American Teens/Young Adults), or that more uncontrolled African American Youths are being let out on the town without a proper sense of manner/conduct lessons from their parents which leads them to commit more crime (minor/non-felony crimes).

    The laissez-faire method of child instruction that some African American families impose on their children along with the introduction of the digital age (smartphones/social media/etc.) causes some African American Children to not develop firm moral codes and proper behavior constituent with being a citizen of these United States. This causes them to act inappropriately through no fault of their own and inadvertently can cause law enforcement involvement and sometimes arrest and other forms of punishment is warranted by the rule of law as a result of inappropriate handling of the situation by these Youths. The children of such families are the victims here, are not at fault, and should not be as responsible as the parents should be for not raising their child correctly. If this fact can be corrected, then there should be a reduction in crime rate among African American teens and young adults which will provide a better future for the African American population.

    One of the preachers who officiated at my Episcopal church said a few years ago in his sermon on MLK day:
    "There is only one race, the human race. Although the different groups don't agree on some aspects of our lives, perhaps we should try to find a middle ground among all people instead of profiling and prejudging those who are different."

    I agree with his statement on so many fronts. As a devout Christian, I say that there is room for more than one creed and more than one culture. We as a people should set aside our differences and work together not for our own personal gain, but for the betterment of humanity. If we do not work together, than we will eventually die in a war together through the principles of Mutually Assured Destruction in our Nuclear Age...

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    Good grief. What has this got to do with washing my clothes?! It's just a cynical marketing ploy to make consumers feel like they are part of something "ethical" when they buy P&G products.

    But what really shocks me is the mother's warning to her daughter about how getting stopped by the police might result in her "not coming home"!

    Are the American police really such a bunch of racist criminals that a mainstream brand issues a warning about people getting stopped and "not coming home"?! That's incredible. How have the police been allowed to degenerate into such a state?!

    So... as cynical as this marketing might be, if things are really so bad, everyone should be talking about it and trying to get something done.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by tiny View Post
    Are the American police really such a bunch of racist criminals that a mainstream brand issues a warning about people getting stopped and "not coming home"?! That's incredible. How have the police been allowed to degenerate into such a state?!
    No, they're not (I know your tongue is stuck firmly in your cheek, but we have a lot of literal minded people here). Its just out of touch marketing people trying way too hard to get on what they perceive as the social justice and diversity bandwagon. You see it everywhere. Walk into any Target store, most of the models in the pictures on the walls and racks feature racially ambiguous models. It's amusing bordering on pathetic.



    So... as cynical as this marketing might be, if things are really so bad, everyone should be talking about it and trying to get something done
    Well, if you were to look around our fake media, you would think the population of the U.S. consisted of 30% persecuted blacks (down from 40% thanks to police culling), 25% well-adjusted gay couples raising children who magically appeared out of nowhere, 25% Mexicans who were kidnapped and air-dropped into Iowa at midnight without their knowledge, consent... or documentation,10% peace loving muslims, and 10% adorable transgender children bullied by everyone, but especially by evil Republican Texas schools and legislators.

    The millenial borg buy into all this because their eyes never leave their screens to see the real world. Marketers play to them since they're the one's with plenty of disposable income. Living in mom's basement on mom's health insurance, all of their income is disposable, even if it's only minimum wage.

    - - - Updated - - -



    Quote Originally Posted by Starrunner View Post
    The video has raised a considerable amount of controversy amongst conservative white groups but also social justice groups with its message that discrimination is inevitable and that police officers are the enemy.
    It's good advice for any kid to "try twice as hard". It's good advice to instruct any kid how to behave during a traffic stop. Every kid is going to make at least one mistake and get stopped regardless of tan. Inevitable. The stated and unstated implications of the rest of the comments are blatantly racist. That helps noone.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Starrunner View Post
    The campaign has been met with both praise and outrage.
    In other words it's just an ordinary campaign.
    If this is nothing more than a P&G ad campaign then shame on them for stirring up trouble just to get attention.

    If it's true that this is about "the conversations most Black parents have with their children concerning racial bias and prejudice" then it isn't really a campaign at all. It is only stating a fact. Am I to assume from this that "most" black parents are racists? I am more inclined to believe most parents, regardless of race, try to give their children good advice in dealing with the real world. Is it our place to tell parents what to teach their children in these situations?

    I wasn't always the perfect angel you see today. On more than one occasion in my youth I ran away from the cops. I never worried about getting shot in the back because that just didn't happen in my neighborhood. If I grew up in a neighborhood where getting shot by the cops while running away was a possibility I expect my parents would have given me "the talk".

    Is racism the result of nature, nurture, or both?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Drifter View Post
    Is racism the result of nature, nurture, or both?
    We all discriminate on a variety of criteria 100 times a day. It's called experience. There aren't enough hours in the day to assess every person and interaction on it's own merits, full of wide-eyed wonder. And in a lot of cases, we wouldn't survive the evaluation experience. Experience tells me that the phone yapping SUV driving soccer mom barreling towards me in the crosswalk likely isn't going to stop at the stop line, and may not even slow down for the crosswalk, even though she has a red light, and there's a sign that says "No right on red when pedestrians are present".

    If I'm on the path at a road intersection, I have a stop sign, the road traffic doesn't. I'm not going to cross in front of grandma in the Buick, even though she politely waves me through. Her demographic is the most likely to confuse gas and brake pedals. There are scars on the tree in front of my house to prove it, and plenty of stories on the evening news about "unintended acceleration" and elderly drivers crashing into strip mall stores.

    Three black 'utes approaching me on the sidewalk. In my neighborhood, antennae down. They're most likely headed for the basketball court at the school just like Junior did 20 years ago (happened yesterday while walking Juno). At 73rd and Ashland, antennae up, watching for strange movements or weapon bulges. Sorry, that's not racist. It's common sense. Things happen daily in Englewood that haven't happened in the 30+ years I've lived in my town. Would I be alert if it was 3 white kids? Maybe, but that's never happened in my lifetime. If it did, I might dial 911 and tell them to be alert for three white kids lost in the 'hood.

    There are a lot of things attributed to racism that really aren't. Worse, modern media are all about hyping this sort of thing out of context.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by tiny View Post
    Good grief. What has this got to do with washing my clothes?! It's just a cynical marketing ploy to make consumers feel like they are part of something "ethical" when they buy P&G products.
    It's basically them selling their name, rather than any specific product. It's to get people to think "P&G is really thinking about these important issues", "P&G is so progressive", and "P&G really cares about me. They understand this problem that affects me. They're not doing this to just sell another stupid product". So when they're shopping, and they come across the P&G products, think of this ad, and buy their products rather than the competition as a way to support them for caring about this issue. So basically, they're getting people to buycott them. Yeah, buying P&G products isn't the solution to the problem, obviously. Yeah, they're doing it so people will buy P&G products, but I still support the ad. It is shining a light on a serious problem in America and don't have any issue with any company trying to get people to buycott them.



    Quote Originally Posted by tiny View Post
    But what really shocks me is the mother's warning to her daughter about how getting stopped by the police might result in her "not coming home"!

    Are the American police really such a bunch of racist criminals that a mainstream brand issues a warning about people getting stopped and "not coming home"?! That's incredible. How have the police been allowed to degenerate into such a state?!
    Is that a real conversation black families have? Yes. Those warnings are indeed real.

    The solution is not to simply say that all American police are a bunch of racist criminals. That is not true. The vast majority of America police do a really good job. But that still doesn't mean that this is a serious problem. It may be a minority, but it's a big enough minority making this happen frequently enough to cause conversations like the one where the mother warning her daughter that getting stopped might result in her not coming home to be necessary.

    I know that the roots of police brutality and the causes of the problem go way deeper than I can explain in one post. But for a very brief explanation, we don't have good police training in America. Police here are essentially told to "Shoot first, ask questions later". They're taught to never take any chances with their life, and that you always shoot if you're life is threatened. This is partially understandable because so many people in America are armed and carrying guns. So police can be worried that anybody they encounter can just pull a gun on them. Add in unconscious racial bias and you pretty much have a recipe for disaster.



    Quote Originally Posted by tiny View Post
    So... as cynical as this marketing might be, if things are really so bad, everyone should be talking about it and trying to get something done.
    You're right. Everyone should be talking about it and trying to get something done. Unfortunately, a big enough chunk of the country refuses to believe that there's any problem. Too many people will just write off this problem as "Fake News" (as well as anything that goes against their world view). These people will yell at the people talking about it and trying to do something about it, screaming at them for making a problem out of nothing, usually making the so painfully idiotically wrong that it hurts point that "You're the real racists because you're bringing up race!". And then a good chunk of people will see the police murdering a black guy, such as Eric Garner, Tamir Rice, or Philando Castile, and then praise those police officers for shooting them and usually saying "Those thugs had it coming!", and I don't have a single nice thing to say about any of those bastards who say that.

    Too many people believe that discussing this problem is an attack on all police officers, and because they know cops who are good people and have had really good experiences with the police, they think "This can't be a problem! The police are great!". Well, at least more people are talking about this and trying to do something about it. So at least some progress is very slowly being made.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Maxx View Post

    The millenial borg buy into all this because their eyes never leave their screens to see the real world. Marketers play to them since they're the one's with plenty of disposable income. Living in mom's basement on mom's health insurance, all of their income is disposable, even if it's only minimum wage.
    *Checks birth certificate*

    *Checks wallet*

    Well, seeing the days of being able to support oneself with just a high-school diploma at a decently-paying job are just about over... it's little wonder we don't - or should I say can't - leave our mothers' basements.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Maxx View Post

    The millenial borg buy into all this because their eyes never leave their screens to see the real world. Marketers play to them since they're the one's with plenty of disposable income. Living in mom's basement on mom's health insurance, all of their income is disposable, even if it's only minimum wage.
    .
    I have a bit of a wake-up call for you here, Maxx. Being a millennial and all.

    First of all, mom can't afford you living in her basement, because she spent all her money on herself. Dad won't help you either, because in his opinion you're incapable of completing college and must have somehow cheated to get your degree. Oh, and an undergraduate degree will sink you upwards of $50k into debt, AFTER scholarships and AFTER family contributions; if your parents tell you differently they're lying. Mine did, and they lied. Oh, your parents will also likely tell you that you can virtually "write your own ticket" for a job if you earn a high GPA from a good school. Bullshit. You're lucky if you can get as far as an interview.

    The problem, really, is that those generations which came prior to millennials live in a bubble of denial and don't see the world for what it is. They wear rose-tinted glasses.

    Did you think that parents put effort into providing for their children? Get real, Maxx... this isn't TV Land. Things don't work out like they do on old shows such as Leave It To Beaver. You have to make your own way in this world, and your parents are too self-absorbed to be able or willing to help.
    Last edited by Sapphyre; 09-Aug-2017 at 05:00.

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