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Thread: Flying United Airlines is a drag!

  1. #1

    Default Flying United Airlines is a drag!

    If you're flying with United Airlines, is it advisable to take a self-defense course before boarding your flight?

    A United Airlines passenger was dragged off a plane by his arms with a bloodied lip as horrified passengers looked on.



    The incident occurred on a flight from Chicago to Louisville. The screaming man was forcibly dragged from his seat by three officers from the Chicago Aviation Police, pushed to the ground and dragged down the aisle. The man, who said he was a doctor and needed to be at his destination to treat his patients, was among four passengers randomly 'selected' on the full flight to give up their seats for United Airlines employees who needed to be in Louisville by Monday, according to witnesses.

    The Department of Transportation said it was reviewing whether United Airlines complied with overbook rules that require airlines to have guidelines on how passengers are denied boarding if they do not voluntarily give up their seats.

    While it may be legal for airlines to involuntarily bump passengers from an oversold flight when there are not enough volunteers, it is the airline's responsibility to determine its own fair boarding priorities. Apparently the flight was not technically overbooked, only that United Airlines decided at the last minute that four of its crew needed to be on that flight.

    And yes, this is the same airline that was in the news last week for refusing to let a woman board her flight because she was wearing leggings.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/26/u...ings.html?_r=0
    Last edited by Starrunner; 11-Apr-2017 at 23:03.

  2. #2

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    Well, I know who I'm never boarding with in the future. What if this same situation applied to shopping? All checkout-lines are full so the owner kicks you out of the store. He then puts all your items back and doesn't let you back in until at least one line is open. So dumb.

    Also, United Airways has more than one plane don't they? If he truly "couldn't fit on the plane", they should have at least placed him and the other three passengers on a different one.

    Earlier this year, they denied service to a blind woman and her service dog.

  3. #3

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    The unfriendly Skies of United.
    They are employee-owned and they've always been hard to deal with in some cases.

  4. #4

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    What's not being told is he, and all other passengers, were offered $800 voutchers. Enough to fly business class on a later flight.

    Also not being told, that computer selection was not random. Buisness and first class are given priority. Early check-ins are given second priority. Third comes premium economy, then regular economy. And last is anyone that borded late or used airline miles. Or roughly about that.

  5. #5

  6. #6

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    This is fucking disgusting. Fuck United Airlines. Fucking assholes.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Slomo View Post
    What's not being told is he, and all other passengers, were offered $800 voutchers. Enough to fly business class on a later flight.

    Also not being told, that computer selection was not random. Buisness and first class are given priority. Early check-ins are given second priority. Third comes premium economy, then regular economy. And last is anyone that borded late or used airline miles. Or roughly about that.
    The fact is that the airline company knew before the passengers boarded the plane that they would have to throw four of their passengers off the flight before takeoff. The passengers all paid for their flight, while the company was throwing them off because they needed to get four of their own crew, who fly for free, to Louisville. It wasn't a case of an overbooked flight, but rather, the airline was tossing people off the plane to solve their own problem.

    This is any company's worst PR nightmare, demonstrating a complete failure to negotiate a solution and resorting to violence. Originally they offered the passengers $400 to get off the plane. When that failed, they upped it to $800. Nothing stopped them from going higher or negotiating with another passenger to reach a settlement.

    The man they assaulted was 70 years old, which in itself makes their behaviour problematic, but he was also travelling with his wife, meaning that the couple was being separated against their will.

  8. #8

  9. #9

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    Well it is their plane and airline tickets are subject to refusal at company discresion. So really there is no legal repercussion that can be filed against united. The more troublesome fact is that united is getting the bad rap for actions taken by individuals of a completely separate organization. The real issue lies with the Chicago airport security not united.

    Sent from my LG-H910 using Tapatalk

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by w0lfpack91 View Post
    Well it is their plane and airline tickets are subject to refusal at company discresion. So really there is no legal repercussion that can be filed against united. The more troublesome fact is that united is getting the bad rap for actions taken by individuals of a completely separate organization. The real issue lies with the Chicago airport security not united.

    Sent from my LG-H910 using Tapatalk
    Not exactly true.

    First of all, it's airline spin to call this an overbooking. The statutory provision granting them the ability to deny boarding is about "OVERSALES", specifically defines as booking more reserved confirmed seats than there are available. This is not what happened. They did not overbook the flight; they had a fully booked flight, and not only did everyone already have a reserved confirmed seat, they were all sitting in them. The law allowing them to denying boarding in the event of an oversale does not apply.

    Even if it did apply, the law is unambiguously clear that airlines have to give preference to everyone with reserved confirmed seats when choosing to involuntarily deny boarding. They have to always choose the solution that will affect the least amount of reserved confirmed seats. This rule is straightforward, and United makes very clear in their own contract of carriage that employees of their own or of other carriers may be denied boarding without compensation because they do not have reserved confirmed seats. On its face, it's clear that what they did was illegal-- they gave preference to their employees over people who had reserved confirmed seats, in violation of 14 CFR 250.2a.

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