Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15

Thread: Realized

  1. #1

    Default Realized

    I just realized something. ALL JOBS ARE POINTLESS. I don't see anything I could live with for a long period of time. Managing is moronic. I just get blamed for everything and anything. Cooking is a waste of time when people could cook for themselves. Office work is also stupid. Retail is a waste of time. City work is (Choose negative noun here) No job has any meaning. Give up your time for an unfair amount of money. One person get thousands, while another gets barely enough to live off of. None of this s^it is right. I truly want nothing to do with this anymore. I can't do anything, but horrible things to feel like I have any effect on it. All I can do is take myself out of the equation. I want nothing more than for this pain to F'ing stop, but life chooses to continue my suffering. A doctor can't help with this pain. I want to quit my job, but if I do I will never leave this horrible place I call home. If I leave home I won't be doing any better. I will still be in a job I hate and won't find any happiness. The only point I've seen to my life is pain and suffering. I want a little mercy now. Someone, something end this already. I have no hope anymore. With no college degree or special trade skill, I have no future. I can't stand or afford what it takes to get these things. Drugs and liquor finally make sense. How is it that just living hurts. I would try talking to my mother, but her every answer lately has been god. Time has shown God hates me. I'm his punching bag and I think he finally punched the sand out of me.

    I don't even know if I want to come back here anymore either.

  2. #2

    Default

    Awww... *hugs* I'll have to keep this short for now, as I just woke up, am half-awake, and need to run off to my own pointless job soon...

    I think every job entails some degree of BS, but there are jobs out there that people find meaningful overall. Teachers, doctors, nurses, etc., usually get something out of helping others through their work. Even cooking... actually not everyone can do that very well at all, it's a skill, and a chef is providing people with far better food than they could have prepared for themselves (and hopefully impressing them while at it). I have a friend who works as a veterinarian and although there are many difficult aspects to that job (incompetent managers, incompetent admin assistants, incompetent clients, euthanizing pets, nevermind the gore factor with surgery and etc...), she loves helping animals and it's what she wants to do.

    To contrast somewhat with your predicament, I'm fairly sure that I "should" be a teacher or college professor. The thing is, I can't presently afford to do that, precisely because I have a college degree and the student debt to prove it. I need high-paying (and generally soulless) jobs to cover my bills. I long for the day when I have enough financial freedom to take a job because I really want it, not because I need the salary offered.

    So, when you say "If I leave home I won't be doing any better. I will still be in a job I hate and won't find any happiness"... let me ask you something. If we forget entirely about job prerequisites, college degrees, financial constraints, the job market, what is even considered a "job", etc, etc, what would you really want to do if you could do or be anything for a living? What I'm gathering from your post (among other things) is that you're feeling rather directionless and probably can't think of what you'd really enjoy doing... and I think finding that is likely an important step toward rekindling some sort of ambition. The thing is you have to deliberately ignore all of the obstacles the lie in the various paths you can choose, to pick the one you truly want rather than what seems practical given your circumstances. How you spend your life, at least in the long term, has to be the way that you'd want to spend it... not the way circumstances have forced you to spend it... in order to have meaning. Or so it seems to me.

    I've gone through many of these same feelings, and to be honest I'm not out of the woods yet myself. But I see a light at the end of the tunnel...

    I hope you keep coming back here.

    Take care of yourself. *hugs again*
    Last edited by Sapphyre; 06-Apr-2017 at 13:20.

  3. #3

    Default

    I thought about several ways to respond to this, this seemed close enough to right, because fuck all else is ( :

    Hope you enjoy


    I dont know you but send me a message if you want to just talk or anything

  4. #4

    Default

    As far as I see it your possibilities for action are as follows:

    -Become an entrepreneur so you will be on the better side of this unfair deal you described

    -Arrange with a decent job and stop complaining, no job is actually meaningless, every working person contributes something. Of course, some more than others, some more important than others. But still, it's kinda necessary that we have persons that, idk, pave the street? Not pointless at all.

    -Quit the hamster wheel. Pack your things and get out of society or find a society where you don't need to work and get money anyway. Or be on your own in nature. Maybe read some Thoreau before.

    I can't say whether you are a little / medium / very depressed or just have a huge attitude problem. Or maybe both. It it was the latter I would like to quote House of Cards here: You are entitled to nothing. If it is the first one: A doctor WILL help. Depression affects how you see the world. In any case it would be considerate of you to either explicitly rant here (totally okay, but be prepared for some feedback you don't want to hear) or seek some comfort and real advice (then you are very welcome and everyone will be extra nice with cookies).

  5. #5

    Default

    Life is too short to spend it doing things that you detest. If it is at all possible, figure out what gives you the most pleasure and find a way to make a living from that. I spent nearly four decades as a teacher and honestly loved every minute of it. But I acknowledge that I am one of the lucky ones and that there are jobs out there that have to be done that no one will have a passion for. And there are many people who find themselves in no position to move themselves into a dream job, at least at the present time. So OK then:

    Work may suck.

    But it becomes a necessary evil in your life. Living in the modern world requires that you make a living and making a living requires that you work. And, as pampersguy said, pretty much all jobs are necessary in one way or another. Someone much brighter than I am said that, even if everyone on earth had a college degree, we'd still need people to deliver the pizzas. So even if you don't love it, try to find that about it that makes it important. And while you do it to make your money, seek the job that you can love. That's the one you need. Everyone loves different things. My cousin built a lawn mowing and snow removal business and he loves doing it. Maybe you love retail. Maybe you love working with numbers. Maybe you love working with horses. Whatever: find what you do love and seek that life. You will get there eventually if you really want to.

  6. #6

    Default

    I think that all work provides a service to someone, regardless of its level of skill, and serves an important function. No matter what industry you're involved in, the important thing is to commit yourself to excellence, taking pride in your work and exceeding expeditions. Be good at what you do, and be good at promoting it. It will be noticed.

    CHOOSING A PATH

    I think the important thing in finding a meaningful job (as with everything else in life) is to make a decision and develop a plan. Sometimes it involves going outside your comfort zone, and sometimes, when there's nothing left to lose, it involves some risk. Weighing the options, making decisions, and not looking back. I was twenty eight years old, about your age, when I had the courage to leave behind a stable, good paying job in the government and went back to school to take up a more fulfilling career where the pay wasn't as good, but the work has been wonderful and meaningful to me. No regrets. There's nothing wrong with feeling frustrated or being scared of the future, it's normal when you want to move on but you're afraid to take the risk. Just build your plan, follow your heart, and see it through. You need to weigh it against the fear of being trapped in an existence where you're unhappy for the rest of your life.

    Choosing the right path is difficult. Think of it as coming to a fork in the road, where each path has a number of unknowns. You decide to go left, then right, then left again. The important thing is to take the time to consider all the options and consequences to the best of your ability, and then stick with the decision. These decisions demand that you come to know yourself and believe in yourself. Don't second guess yourself because it can just be self abuse. Doubts and insecurities will always present themselves along the way, but it is all part of the process of growing.

    It took me ten years before I had the courage to start on my path, to put all that negative junk out of my mind, instilled in me by an abusive father, but none of us can undertake the journey before we are ready. For some of us it takes more time than others. There is no best career option, only the one that is right for you at any given time.

    I think in evaluating a change in careers, you have to consider how it fits in with your personal goals and skills. The important questions to ask are the following:

    What are my skills and talents?
    What are my interests?
    What are my values.?
    What is the income?
    Where is the location?
    What education is required?
    What will I need to sacrifice?
    Who can help me get there?
    Are there any resources available to help me reach my goals?

    By prioritizing these questions, it can help narrow down the field and goals you should be pursuing.

    The truth is, not many of us are cut out to be brain surgeons or astronauts. Most of us will do our work without much recognition, however the work we do is no less important than that of the rich and famous. Someone who volunteers for charities, delivering food to seniors, or someone who repairs cars, making sure every part fits perfectly and is top quality, all of these are services on which others depend.

    It's easy to devalue our own work if we provide a less than creative service like data entry, working in a fast food restaurant, or answering phones in a large corporation, but that work is often the central, most critical link in keeping the business running smoothly and efficiently. We are all links in the chain, and each link is equal in importance.


    DEPRESSION

    I think it always comes back to this, doesn't it? Depression keeps setting us back. Accomplishing goals can be difficult, if not impossible than when our lives are stable. Procrastination, giving up, anger, blaming yourself and others are all symptoms of the illness. Make no mistake about it, depression is an illness. And like any illness, it requires treatment. Part of the symptoms are how they affect your expectations and your goals. Sometimes it means you have to readjust those expectations in relation to your mental health and needs. Some goals may seem unrealistic today, but perhaps not in the future. Just focus on what you can do today and take tiny steps towards reaching them. The smallest steps are crucial to achieving success, self-esteem and recovery. Also, I think you need to address a significant barrier: You need to learn to appreciate the importance of the small steps. When you're suffering from depression, it's critical to choose goals you will likely reach. Otherwise the motivation will go out the window and the depression will return. Small steps set you up for success and keep you going.

    It's easy to want to procrastinate or convince yourself you don't have the resources when all you see is a huge mountain ahead of you, but taking small goals, like committing yourself to saving a percentage of your paycheck each month for a better place to live and establishing achievable timelines will help you realize the mountain is not as insurmountable as you originally thought.

    I really hope to see you move forward in your housing, employment, relationships, however, I do believe that the place to start is the one that has been given the least amount of attention, and that is getting some help for depression.


    HOUSING

    You and I are similar in that we have both been victims of abusive fathers, never having felt love from them. This does affect your outlook on the world, how you see people and how you see yourself. I think your current housing situation, still being under his roof, is not conducive to a healthy state of mind. As long as you share the same living space with him, you will feel his presence crushing down on you and destroying any confidence and self-esteem you have. It wasn't until I left home at the age of eighteen that I started to feel better about myself, even though the scars remain to this day. Getting out of the home would be one of the best things you can do to start building yourself up and seeing yourself as a worthwhile, valuable human being. Even if you were to find a room in a private home or a shared accommodation arrangement, it would still get you set up in a positive environment and allow you to focus on your next goals. If there is a local YM-YWCA in your area, it would be worth contacting them since a number of them offer long term housing, help with finding housing, and employment services.

    HELPLINES

    http://www.suicide.org/suicide-hotlines.html

    ONLINE RESOURCES FOR DEPRESSION AND SUICIDE PREVENTION

    International Association for Suicide Prevention
    https://www.iasp.info/resources/Onli...tion_Services/

    To Write Love On Her Arms
    https://twloha.com/

    Unsuicide
    http://unsuicide.wikispaces.com/Onli...5#.WNmmBfWcHIV
    Last edited by Starrunner; 07-Apr-2017 at 02:51.

  7. #7

    Default

    I went into music because that's what I've always wanted to do. Being a church musician has caused me as much pain as it has joy. It's only been more recently that it's been almost all enjoyment, and I think it's because I'm older and in a good church. People can make one miserable in almost any job situation. I think what got me through those periods in my life was having something else in my life. It came down to leaving work and going home.

    Something has to be enjoyable in your life. If it's not in the job, then it has to happen outside the job. I've always done other things. I've raced cars, built furniture and clocks, played in a very good rock band, and the list goes on. It's all about being pro-active. You have to get up and do something positive. Drinking and drugs only make things worse. I've done that too and it almost killed me.

  8. #8

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by KryanAshford View Post
    I just realized something. ALL JOBS ARE POINTLESS. I don't see anything I could live with for a long period of time. Managing is moronic. I just get blamed for everything and anything. Cooking is a waste of time when people could cook for themselves. Office work is also stupid. Retail is a waste of time. City work is (Choose negative noun here) No job has any meaning. Give up your time for an unfair amount of money. One person get thousands, while another gets barely enough to live off of. None of this s^it is right. I truly want nothing to do with this anymore. I can't do anything, but horrible things to feel like I have any effect on it. All I can do is take myself out of the equation. I want nothing more than for this pain to F'ing stop, but life chooses to continue my suffering. A doctor can't help with this pain. I want to quit my job, but if I do I will never leave this horrible place I call home. If I leave home I won't be doing any better. I will still be in a job I hate and won't find any happiness. The only point I've seen to my life is pain and suffering. I want a little mercy now. Someone, something end this already. I have no hope anymore. With no college degree or special trade skill, I have no future. I can't stand or afford what it takes to get these things. Drugs and liquor finally make sense. How is it that just living hurts. I would try talking to my mother, but her every answer lately has been god. Time has shown God hates me. I'm his punching bag and I think he finally punched the sand out of me.

    I don't even know if I want to come back here anymore either.
    Song intimately related to topic.

    And this one's to make you feel better. Agony is truth, pain and suffering are your connection the living. You're hurting, just like me and everyone else on this clump of celestial dust we call a planet.

    But there's no love without pain, and no joy without despair. The best you can do is accept it as perfection. Live with your past, for the future, by making the best of the present.

  9. #9

  10. #10

Similar Threads

  1. I just realized that I am Genderqueer, what next?
    By Crinklesaurus in forum Sissy / Girls
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 08-Feb-2015, 05:24
  2. I just realized something
    By babykumar in forum Adult Babies & Littles
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 05-Oct-2010, 18:48
  3. I just realized...
    By Error404 in forum Off-topic
    Replies: 34
    Last Post: 20-Jul-2010, 12:47
  4. I just realized...
    By timmahtherebel in forum Off-topic
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 27-Feb-2009, 05:17
  5. Just realized i never introduced myself here
    By Ryger in forum Greetings / Introductions
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 25-Aug-2008, 11:53

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
ADISC.org - the Adult Baby / Diaper Lover / Incontinence Support Community.
ADISC.org is designed to be viewed in Firefox, with a resolution of at least 1280 x 1024.