View Poll Results: Telling someone they are a "feminist" is

Voters
54. You may not vote on this poll
  • very complimentary.

    1 1.85%
  • complimentary.

    5 9.26%
  • neither a compliment nor an insult.

    35 64.81%
  • insulting.

    7 12.96%
  • very insulting.

    1 1.85%
  • I don't know.

    5 9.26%
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Thread: Feminism

  1. #1

    Default Feminism

    As many of you know, I teach a class on contemporary political ideology. We began our section on Feminism last week, and I came across a statistic like the one I asked in the poll above. I don't want to say the results because that would compromise the poll. I'm just curious what people think and why. As always, remain civil.

  2. #2

    Default

    There are different types of feminism, as you are aware.

    (If you've not had this exposure, don't click below - let harris do the big reveal.)

  3. #3

    Default

    I think sometimes people don't know what feminism is.

    As far as I've known since I've grown up, is that feminism is for equal rights for males and females... however, some people go to far, to the point where they try to give females more options then men, which defeats the purpose.

    I'm a menist.

    All joking aside, though, I'm not a feminist, and I wouldn't care if I was called one, though. As a woman, I feel that I've had all the opportunities that men have had. Will that change in the future as I grow? Maybe.... but until that time comes, I'm fine with the way things are now.

  4. #4
    Butterfly Mage

    Default

    Considering that feminism embodies the "remarkable" notion that women should have the same pay, civil rights, and career opportinities as men, I'd say that being called a feminist is complementary.

  5. #5

    Default

    Most times I come across someone called a feminist in modern times, they are actually believe in female superiority. In fact, most 'equality' groups that you come across in the media currently seem to actually believe in the superiorty of the group to which they belong.

    I believe the theory that men and women are equal to be a rule that we should never turn from. An even better form of it is that men and women are equal but different - they have the same rights but in some areas men will perform better and in others women will, if you were able to make an average level of success for certain tasks.

    Modern 'Feminism' as I understand it is an ugly beast, having gone past equality at break neck pace and now wanting superiority. To be called a femimist in the intended meaning of the word should not be an insult by any stretch of the imagination. To be called a feminist as it is used by a number of people (and from my point of view is actually used more commonly than the 'correct' usage) is just the same as saying a man thinks men are superior, and thus insulting.

  6. #6

    Default

    I would have chosen "entirely dependent on context", but it wasn't an option. If used in the egalitarian sense, I'd say it's a compliment, however as others have said, it's often used today as a pejorative term.

  7. #7
    soren456

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by chevre View Post
    I would have chosen "entirely dependent on context", but it wasn't an option. If used in the egalitarian sense, I'd say it's a compliment, however as others have said, it's often used today as a pejorative term.
    I agree. I think that "feminist" as a useful descriptive term is on its way out; it represents what is now a niche in a larger progressive movement. I think that now that its intentions and agendas are better known, better understood and better accomplished (as are queer politics--though not so much accomplished), it folds more into the mainstream and need not identify itself separately, or stridently.

  8. #8

    Default

    I dunno.
    I myself use it as a descriptor, neither a compliment, nor an insult.

  9. #9

    Default

    I see it as insulting. In a standard conversation(anything outside of proper academia) I have only ever heard feminist used as a negative descriptor, normally to describe militant lesbians or other female dominate groups. That is pretty standard with groups in general.

  10. #10

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by mzkkbprmt View Post
    Most times I come across someone called a feminist in modern times, they are actually believe in female superiority. In fact, most 'equality' groups that you come across in the media currently seem to actually believe in the superiorty of the group to which they belong.

    I believe the theory that men and women are equal to be a rule that we should never turn from. An even better form of it is that men and women are equal but different - they have the same rights but in some areas men will perform better and in others women will, if you were able to make an average level of success for certain tasks.

    Modern 'Feminism' as I understand it is an ugly beast, having gone past equality at break neck pace and now wanting superiority. To be called a femimist in the intended meaning of the word should not be an insult by any stretch of the imagination. To be called a feminist as it is used by a number of people (and from my point of view is actually used more commonly than the 'correct' usage) is just the same as saying a man thinks men are superior, and thus insulting.
    I think this is a really good summary of my own views on the subject regarding the lay understanding and use of the word.

    (Huh, huh, I said "lay" in a post about feminism. How cool is that?)

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