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Thread: ISPs allowed to sell your browsing and app usage data?

  1. #1

    Default ISPs allowed to sell your browsing and app usage data?

    https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/...snt-sensitive/

    Really? Why? Why is this happening? Can someone please tell me, and prove to me, that this isn't really as bad as it sounds?

    The only "reassuring" points I can see are that this technically was never prohibited, not until this upcoming December. And that... Maybe ISPs aren't doing this, so far? I don't even know that for sure.

  2. #2

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    Well... if Comcast is really that interested in my Google searches for ''anime characters in diapers''... I hope they enjoy what they see.

  3. #3

  4. #4

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    You can hide easily. Use TOR, or a vpn or a socks proxy.

  5. #5

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    I've just bought a book /1984/. Internet privacy doesn't exist and that worries me a lot.

  6. #6

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    In one form or another, this sort of eavesdropping has happened since the beginning of the internet. Cookies anyone?

    Perhaps ISP's (as opposed to individual websites) collecting and selling the data is something new? I guess I always assumed that it was like CB and Amateur Radio back in the day. Anyone and everyone could be listening. I would hope that at least e-mail (and banking!?!?) remains somewhat secure. Without those, the whole thing becomes an amusing but largely useless children's toy.
    Last edited by Maxx; 19-Mar-2017 at 12:42.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Maxx View Post
    In one form or another, this sort of eavesdropping has happened since the beginning of the internet. Cookies anyone?

    Perhaps ISP's (as opposed to individual websites) collecting and selling the data is something new? I guess I always assumed that it was like CB and Amateur Radio back in the day. Anyone and everyone could be listening. I would hope that at least e-mail (and banking!?!?) remains somewhat secure. Without those, the whole thing becomes an amusing but largely useless children's toy.
    With CB and amateur radio, you were broadcasting everything you said to the world. The signal goes out in all directions. Not a fair comparison. This is more like the local library selling data on which books you read to anyone who wants it, or the phone company selling data on who exactly you call and who calls you. I don't want to hear a response argument of, "If you've got nothing to hide, why worry?" Give better reasoning.

    Do you want your ISP to sell the fact that you visit ADISC to anyone and everyone? It would be great marketing for companies like ABU, Bambino, and other adult diaper sellers. They get to buy a list of names of people who visit here together with their physical addresses and send out advertising in the mail! You'd get offers from Depends, Tena, Prevail, all of the major adult diaper manufacturers as well.

  8. #8

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    Huh. They tried this ten years ago in the UK.

    BT (major phone company and ISP) secretly (and probably criminally) teamed up with a company called Phorm to spy on their customers' communications. Ostensibly, the idea was that users could be tracked, regardless of whether they accepted cookies or scripts. This info was to be used for advertising profiling.

    Fortunately, some technically-minded customers noticed that even brand new computers were being "attacked" as soon as they were connected to the ISP.

    The share price of Phorm rocketed as greedy investors saw how much profit it could generate. BT insisted the secret trials of Phorm were legal, but legal experts queued up to say they were wrong. Tim Berners Lee publicly criticised the loss of privacy from such a system.

    People ditched BT (and other ISPs with an interest in Phorm) in droves. A BT press spokesman described the period as "a year of the most intensive, personal-reputation-destroying PR trench warfare".

    Before long Phorm collapsed due to the bad publicity.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technolog...-unfolded.html
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phorm
    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/02/29/phorm_roundup/
    https://www.dephormation.org.uk

    I hope you guys across the pond can destroy this invasion to privacy too.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by tiny View Post
    Huh. They tried this ten years ago in the UK.

    BT (major phone company and ISP) secretly (and probably criminally) teamed up with a company called Phorm to spy on their customers' communications. Ostensibly, the idea was that users could be tracked, regardless of whether they accepted cookies or scripts. This info was to be used for advertising profiling.

    Fortunately, some technically-minded customers noticed that even brand new computers were being "attacked" as soon as they were connected to the ISP.

    The share price of Phorm rocketed as greedy investors saw how much profit it could generate. BT insisted the secret trials of Phorm were legal, but legal experts queued up to say they were wrong. Tim Berners Lee publicly criticised the loss of privacy from such a system.

    People ditched BT (and other ISPs with an interest in Phorm) in droves. A BT press spokesman described the period as "a year of the most intensive, personal-reputation-destroying PR trench warfare".

    Before long Phorm collapsed due to the bad publicity.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technolog...-unfolded.html
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phorm
    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/02/29/phorm_roundup/
    https://www.dephormation.org.uk

    I hope you guys across the pond can destroy this invasion to privacy too.
    Not likely if you are in the US, your ISP choices are Comcast (or what ever your local cable company is) or Verizon if you are lucky to live in a place with the choice, but a great majority of the people get the choice of cable company or no ISP. (true there are a very very very very few lucky people that have other choices, but they probably don't even make up 1% of the US population) This is if you want the internet today, sure you can go to dial up, BUT dial up can not do the internet anymore.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by AnalogRTO View Post
    With CB and amateur radio, you were broadcasting everything you said to the world. The signal goes out in all directions. Not a fair comparison. This is more like the local library selling data on which books you read to anyone who wants it, or the phone company selling data on who exactly you call and who calls you. I don't want to hear a response argument of, "If you've got nothing to hide, why worry?" Give better reasoning.

    Do you want your ISP to sell the fact that you visit ADISC to anyone and everyone? It would be great marketing for companies like ABU, Bambino, and other adult diaper sellers. They get to buy a list of names of people who visit here together with their physical addresses and send out advertising in the mail! You'd get offers from Depends, Tena, Prevail, all of the major adult diaper manufacturers as well.
    No, I don't want that to happen, but I was under the impression it already was happening.
    Last edited by Maxx; 20-Mar-2017 at 13:28.

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