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Thread: Something about addictions

  1. #1

    Default Something about addictions


    I was going to put this under the thread under the one I put on why do Grown up drink Alcohol. But after I finished thought it would be better hear.

    really hope I don't offend anybody with this, but I really need to wright this just feel it is going to help someone.

    Alcoholism is not funny just like any other mental health conditions, or additions. It can rip families apart and that really sad.

    My brother is an alcoholic and that is one of the reasons that I did not won't him to be my caregiver.

    It was hard for me, but I provided that I could live independently and that I did have capacity to make my own choice. When my mother and he had set so much up for me for when she died, I know my mother had my best interest at heart, it just not what I wonted and they had not talked it over with me.

    Going off subject if you are a caregiver to a Little, Little /AB or even a Middle, and you are concerned about the future for them, talk to them, we are able to understand it not that we lake intelligence we just see the world differently.

    I have had lots of cancelling for depression and anxiety. And have work with some of the most vulnerable people that come to our church community.

    There is something called the 12 Steps that is to help people that struggling with addiction.

    I was thinking it maybe helpful to our community to know about it, not that I saying that we are all addicted to our pacifiers, like I am. Hee, hee.

    Ok

    Step 1 We admitted we were powerless over our addiction that our lives had become unmanageable.

    (this is a big step for some people because it leaves them vulnerable, and out of control.)

    Step 2 Came to believe that a Power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity.

    (For me that was Jesus. But this is not the time or the place to go into that.)

    Step 3 Made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we understood Him.

    Step 4 Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves
    (self discovery can be scary at the start, but as I got to know more about my self the better I could under stand why I did certain thing and why I avoided other things.)

    Step 5 Admitted to God, to ourselves, and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs.
    (saying sorry and really being sorry is an important part of discovering who you really are.)

    Step 6 and 7 Were entirely ready to have God remove all these defects of character. And humbly asked Him to remove our shortcomings.

    (This will happen with some thing if you are really sorry, but God will not recreate you. He has made you special; as you discover who you really are you will start to like your self.)

    Step 8 and step 9 Made a list of all persons we had harmed, and became willing to make amends to them all. And made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.

    (this is all part of saying that you are sorry and wont to change. To become the person that God made you to be in the first place. In doing step 8 & 9 will discover more about your self than you can imagine.)

    Step 10 Continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong promptly admitted it.

    Step 11 Sought through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious contact with God as we understood Him, praying for knowledge of His will for us and the power to carry that out.

    Step 12 Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to others, and to practice these principles in all our affairs.

    (I think this means that Jesus become our friend. And we live life to it fullest. In the way that God had made us to be.)

    Well I hope that this is helpful to someone,

    Have lots of fun.

    Sisi


  2. #2

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    That was nice of you to be concerned for others with an alcohol problem. I drank a lot when I was much younger, but a bleeding ulcer in 1985 put an end to that. I had to quit cold turkey which actually wasn't hard at all. I don't think I had a physical addiction, but rather, an emotional addiction.

    I've often wondered when I've read posts on this site that didn't make a lot of sense, if the sender wasn't drunk or high? Anyway, everything in moderation.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by sisi View Post
    There is something called the 12 Steps that is to help people that struggling with addiction.
    Here's the thing about your program, which is either AA or something based off of it. It doesn't work. You may have had success with it, but that's not the same thing. It's a placebo. Let's say that I have a new painkiller for headaches I want to test out. What I do is get 100 people and when they say they have a headache, I give them either Pill A or Pill B; 50 people get each. Pill A is the real drug. Pill B is some glycerin. Of the 50 people who took Pill A, 28 people reported their headache got better. Sounds great, right? Not if 29 people reported that Pill B worked. In other words, while some people did get the treatment and did get the outcome they wanted, the outcome is no related to the treatment. It was coincidental.

    AA is similar. Its success rate is pathetic- somewhere between 5-10% of regular attendees will abstain from alcohol long-term. And as terrible as that success rate sounds, it gets worse when I tell you the rate of spontaneous remission of alcoholism is similar if not higher. What does that mean? Say I find 100 alcoholics who want to gain sobriety. I send 50 of them to AA. I send the other 50 home and tell them good luck. The ones I sent home with no support have a better chance of quitting than the ones I sent to AA. You're better off literally doing nothing than attending AA. Furthermore, whereas AA has a decently high recidivism rate, people who experience spontaneous remission have extremely low rates of recidivism.

    AA kills people. It's not real help, it's a farce that keeps people from getting real help, and people who go to AA are less likely to beat their addiction than people who do nothing. If there's a person in your life you care about who's an alcoholic, for God's sake, do everything you can to keep them away from AA and get them to a medical professional instead of a group of charlatans.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by AEsahaettr View Post
    Here's the thing about your program, which is either AA or something based off of it. It doesn't work. You may have had success with it, but that's not the same thing. It's a placebo. Let's say that I have a new painkiller for headaches I want to test out. What I do is get 100 people and when they say they have a headache, I give them either Pill A or Pill B; 50 people get each. Pill A is the real drug. Pill B is some glycerin. Of the 50 people who took Pill A, 28 people reported their headache got better. Sounds great, right? Not if 29 people reported that Pill B worked. In other words, while some people did get the treatment and did get the outcome they wanted, the outcome is no related to the treatment. It was coincidental.

    AA is similar. Its success rate is pathetic- somewhere between 5-10% of regular attendees will abstain from alcohol long-term. And as terrible as that success rate sounds, it gets worse when I tell you the rate of spontaneous remission of alcoholism is similar if not higher. What does that mean? Say I find 100 alcoholics who want to gain sobriety. I send 50 of them to AA. I send the other 50 home and tell them good luck. The ones I sent home with no support have a better chance of quitting than the ones I sent to AA. You're better off literally doing nothing than attending AA. Furthermore, whereas AA has a decently high recidivism rate, people who experience spontaneous remission have extremely low rates of recidivism.

    AA kills people. It's not real help, it's a farce that keeps people from getting real help, and people who go to AA are less likely to beat their addiction than people who do nothing. If there's a person in your life you care about who's an alcoholic, for God's sake, do everything you can to keep them away from AA and get them to a medical professional instead of a group of charlatans.

    Hi

    Thank you for your input, I don't know anything about AA. But I have seen people completely changed with in our community. I think it is who you have as a God, it not going to work if your higher power is the blue fairy, no matter how much you wish she turns you in to a real boy.

    Also I think that people have to come to the point that they don't want to do something any more. I don't want to be depressed anymore.

    This is a life long journey it not something someone does and they are all better, I am constantly learning about my self, and the person God created me to be. And I love the fact that I am a Little. As we call it, that I am child like and that ok, I don't have to try to be a proper grown up anymore because I'm not one and never will be. I am me. Hee, hee


  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by AEsahaettr View Post
    Here's the thing about your program, which is either AA or something based off of it. It doesn't work. You may have had success with it, but that's not the same thing. It's a placebo.
    I totally agree. Placebos can work well with some people, however. The difficulty is that these "twelve-step programmes" require you to invent a god which has magical powers. And for most people, that's a total non-starter.

    They also encourage people to label themselves as weak and incapable. They sell the idea that addiction is IMPOSSIBLE to overcome; that you will always be an addict.

    Through endless retelling of people's low points, people start to wear their weakness as an inverse badge of pride. People are almost encouraged to go out and take drugs so that they have a good story to tell. Genuine psychological issues are completely ignored.

    I think people are more likely to reduce their lifetime-drug-intake if they engage in professional counselling, than if they use arbitrary religious concepts to understand their issues.

  6. #6

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    Hi Sisi! I recognise that 12 step program are you by any chance a member of the LDS church community? I am a member of that church and I think the plan is really useful. I believe in the healing power of Jesus. Many people don't and I appreciate that too but I honestly think that to be really self reliant you got to be wholly reliant on the Savoir.

    We all got inner childs even people who don't acknowledge their inner childs. Many people's inner childs are hurting because of the bad choices the adult self is making. Jesus can help the adult self and set inner child self free to be happy.

    Overcoming addictive behaviours also is about learning to parent yourself too.

    Here is the LDS link there is some really good information and really good videos to watch of each step. I think it is useful even if you don't think you necessarily got an addiction.

    https://addictionrecovery.lds.org/st...ction?lang=eng

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by tiny View Post
    I totally agree. Placebos can work well with some people, however. The difficulty is that these "twelve-step programmes" require you to invent a god which has magical powers. And for most people, that's a total non-starter.

    They also encourage people to label themselves as weak and incapable. They sell the idea that addiction is IMPOSSIBLE to overcome; that you will always be an addict.

    Through endless retelling of people's low points, people start to wear their weakness as an inverse badge of pride. People are almost encouraged to go out and take drugs so that they have a good story to tell. Genuine psychological issues are completely ignored.

    I think people are more likely to reduce their lifetime-drug-intake if they engage in professional counselling, than if they use arbitrary religious concepts to understand their issues.

    Yes believing in a God is a big step for lots of people, but if they won't to change and are unable to do it by them self, then they will need help from someone that is able to help.


    - - - Updated - - -



    Quote Originally Posted by SparklyTwilight View Post
    Hi Sisi! I recognise that 12 step program are you by any chance a member of the LDS church community? I am a member of that church and I think the plan is really useful. I believe in the healing power of Jesus. Many people don't and I appreciate that too but I honestly think that to be really self reliant you got to be wholly reliant on the Savoir.

    We all got inner childs even people who don't acknowledge their inner childs. Many people's inner childs are hurting because of the bad choices the adult self is making. Jesus can help the adult self and set inner child self free to be happy.

    Overcoming addictive behaviours also is about learning to parent yourself too.

    Here is the LDS link there is some really good information and really good videos to watch of each step. I think it is useful even if you don't think you necessarily got an addiction.

    https://addictionrecovery.lds.org/st...ction?lang=eng

    Hi

    No I long to an Anglican church with a small "a" in that we go with what Jesus is hating to do. Anyway thanks for the links things like this are always helpfull.

    This is my church. http://www.stmags.org.uk


  8. #8

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    Thanks Sisi! Also one time I got really sad and bought lots of dolls from a particular range. I got obsessed with getting every single doll from this range. I never even got them out of the box I just did it cos I was sad. I think sometimes anything can get addictive because everyone wants to feel safe and happy no matter how big we get so we can end up with addictive focuses that distract us from pain. I really believe Jesus can heal though.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by tiny View Post
    I totally agree. Placebos can work well with some people, however. The difficulty is that these "twelve-step programmes" require you to invent a god which has magical powers. And for most people, that's a total non-starter.

    They also encourage people to label themselves as weak and incapable. They sell the idea that addiction is IMPOSSIBLE to overcome; that you will always be an addict.

    Through endless retelling of people's low points, people start to wear their weakness as an inverse badge of pride. People are almost encouraged to go out and take drugs so that they have a good story to tell. Genuine psychological issues are completely ignored.

    I think people are more likely to reduce their lifetime-drug-intake if they engage in professional counselling, than if they use arbitrary religious concepts to understand their issues.
    I have to agree with you. I suffered from alcoholism many years ago, and religion had no place in my recovery. It was a matter of reaching bottom and having the love of good friends who didn't give up on me and stayed with me until I was ready to get help. In my professional work, I am in contact with a number of vulnerable populations, and the best work we can do is connect them to professional resources such as addictions and trauma counsellors, or mental health workers. They have a much greater chance of success by receiving non-judgemental support, and not having to accept the premise of surrendering themselves to a 'higher power.'

    At the same time, I do want to see people get good support when they are in recovery, and support groups can certainly play an important part in providing a sense of community and fellowship. Considering the waiting lists for some professional services, support groups can provide interim and ongoing assistance, and can act as a transition until professional help becomes available. What I am pleased to see are the number of AA groups that are forming around the world which are not religious based and designed for atheists and agnostics.

    http://aaagnostica.org/

    http://www.agnosticaanyc.org/worldwide.html

    https://psmag.com/letting-go-of-god-...6a0#.nnp9w0mov
    Last edited by Starrunner; 08-May-2016 at 14:57.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by SparklyTwilight View Post
    I am a member of that church and I think the plan is really useful.
    Scientific data are pretty clear that it is not at all useful.

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