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Thread: even more DIY

  1. #1

    Default even more DIY

    back to the washing machine:

    considering it's 12 years old, it's not doing bad; and aside from the routine upkeep (which hasn't much at all, just bearings and shocks, totalling 35-ish, so far), the only problem has been it's buttons.
    they've been an issue since we first got it:
    Attachment 26099

    the gaps, as you can see, are pretty small, but they do have a capillary action and in and around a kitchen that's not good. they're also fairly deep, too deep for my old toothbrush to thoroughly clean, so they do occasionally clog up.
    of course, this wouldn't be too bad if the front assembly was sturdily built, but it isn't. only four plastic clips held the PCB, upon which are the buttons and dials, and the second breakage occurred last week (don't ask when the first happened, i think it's been like that since it was put together).

    and so, after a trial screw (since whomever designed the PCB incorporated screw-holes in strategic places; something that nobody else picked-up on during the rest of it's design leading to the failure of the trial screw idea) and then a rethink,
    Attachment 26100

    Attachment 26101

    i was loathe to have screws poking out the front, on display, so a suitable securing bracket or strap was a puzzle until i found a couple of old pelmet-pole brackets. it's only half a bracket, but having two adjusting screws came in handy. at least i have an excuse for that drawer full o' junk.
    the bracket needed a bit of cutting and fettling and the screws, as you can see, are sunk into the top of the front, to be covered over by the top panel of the washing machine.
    i would've liked to have swapped the start button for one of the unused extra-function buttons, but it's all micro stuff and each button had a micro-resistor associated with it.

  2. #2

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    Crikey! That sounds awfully complicated! You need James May over -- have you seen his TV programme where he dismantles and reassembles a lawnmower?!

    My DIY list is piling up... I "fixed" the dripping tap in the kitchen by tactically putting some PTFE tape under the rubber seal in the mixer cartridge, replaced a couple of O-rings with some that... looked sort-of similar... and now you need two hands (and maybe a leg) to wrench the spout round, when it's supposed to move freely... but it doesn't drip!

    I also spent hours raking out cracked grout in my bathroom... until... after hours of tedious labour, the tiles started falling off revealing a rotten panel, meaning that I could have just ripped the damn thing off the wall in the first place.

    All the pipework in the cloakroom is leaking, so I've ripped out the cracked pipe, leaving a hole in the wall and a sink that drains directly onto the carpet.

    And I've got to fix the double-glazed window with a broken bolt that makes it impossible to open... and the other windows that move back and forth...

    Oh... and the leaky toilet and the hole in the ceiling caused by the leak...

    Anyone want a house swap?!

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by tiny View Post
    Crikey! That sounds awfully complicated!
    nah, easy-peasy



    Quote Originally Posted by tiny View Post
    You need James May over -- have you seen his TV programme where he dismantles and reassembles a lawnmower?!
    saw all three of them progs. i was a bit miffed that they weren't more in-depth (perhaps they were just edited badly to fit a time slot?).
    personally, i'm still in love with his Toy Stories: Flight Club. 'awesome' was made for things like that.



    Quote Originally Posted by tiny View Post
    My DIY list is piling up.......Anyone want a house swap?!
    cripes! sounds like our house
    i'm still held off doing stuff because of the weather (snow today, and tomorrow). i'm toying with the idea of cladding my bedroom, as i did with the bathroom, as there's some water damage under my window. the cost of the cladding is off-putting though: 200-ish. so, i'm looking for seconds or summat. 'course, i'll need a few decent window-open days for doing that (the fumes from the adhesive, despite being 'odourless', still affect me).

  4. #4

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    You're not going to believe this, but I bought a Speed Queen washer and it came with a 10 year warranty, though they said they usually last for about 22 years before they need repaired.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by dogboy View Post
    You're not going to believe this, but I bought a Speed Queen washer and it came with a 10 year warranty, though they said they usually last for about 22 years before they need repaired.
    YIKES! at the price (about a grand over here)
    did you get a toploader or front? i remember from childhood that the toploaders lasted decades.

  6. #6

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    I've been in this house over 30 years. The washer and dryer were here when we moved in. There have been some McGyvers along the way.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by ade View Post
    YIKES! at the price (about a grand over here)
    did you get a toploader or front? i remember from childhood that the toploaders lasted decades.
    Definitely a top loader. I don't believe in front loaders as they don't use much water. With washing cloth diapers, I want all the water I can get in that thing. Here in Lynchburg, we have a lot of water, so conservation isn't an issue. The Speed Queen here cost a little over $500.00 if I remember correctly. It may have been $450.00. That's probably because they're one of the few things still made in the U. S. They're made in the state of Wisconsin.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by dogboy View Post
    Definitely a top loader. I don't believe in front loaders as they don't use much water. With washing cloth diapers, I want all the water I can get in that thing. Here in Lynchburg, we have a lot of water, so conservation isn't an issue.
    we're plenty wet, too, but everything revolves around the south over here and they tend to be drier. consequently, modern UK washing-machines are 'water saving'. i hated this washer when we first got it. i'd have to wash my work-clothes two or three times to get the soot and grease out. and i'd add water, like you do.
    i still add water when i'm doing my nappies, but i use the soapy water that i've handwashed my plackies with (only need to use one laundering tablet that way) and i always do an extra rinse cycle.



    Quote Originally Posted by dogboy View Post
    .... they're one of the few things still made in the U. S. They're made in the state of Wisconsin.
    aye, i noticed; and in the town of Ripon, too. the original Ripon is not too far from us (in american terms, that is).

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by ade View Post

    aye, i noticed; and in the town of Ripon, too. the original Ripon is not too far from us (in american terms, that is).
    It's always interesting to see where things are made. A lot of companies have multiple countries where they manufacture so they don't have to pay for transporting and probably tariffs, if I'm guessing correctly. I think Hondas, Toyotas and Subarus are all manufactured in the U. S. as well as Japan and who knows where else.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by dogboy View Post
    It's always interesting to see where things are made. A lot of companies have multiple countries where they manufacture so they don't have to pay for transporting and probably tariffs, if I'm guessing correctly. I think Hondas, Toyotas and Subarus are all manufactured in the U. S. as well as Japan and who knows where else.
    Tariffs are enormous on vehicles. Airplanes are famously expensive to manufacture because not only do they need to be built in-country (by which I mean virtually ever country), but they need to be built with parts that were also built in country. In other words, Boeing can't import all of its parts (seats, fuselage, electronics) from a manufacturer making them in one or two central locations. Say that All Nippon Airways wants 10 Boeing 787 Dreamliners. Great! You'd imagine that they set up a manufacturing plant somewhere in Japan, have vendors ship the parts in, and put them together like a big erector set. Nope! Boeing needs to document to the Japanese government that a certain percentage of its components by cost were manufactured in Japan, or it considers the plane to have been imported. This means that if Boeing wants to sell its planes to an airline in any given country, it needs to open a plant there and also get all of its vendors to open plants there. It's a clusterfuck and this is a huge part of why airplane manufacturers negotiate purchases before production begins. They need a commitment to buy before they even think of assembling a plane in a given country.

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