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Thread: New-Job Issues

  1. #1

    Default New-Job Issues

    I recently started working at a newly-opened sandwich shop. I didn't want the job, but my parents pretty much forced me to take it. Anyway, on my third day of work, when I asked when I was to come back, my manager said she would call me with the schedule ''probably Tuesday.'' Tuesday came and went, and it's now Friday. I tried calling my manager's cell phone three times with no answer. Calling the shop got me nowhere but the other manager - her husband - telling me he was busy and to call her again.

    So I don't know what's going on. Maybe they've already decided they're done with me and are just going to ignore me instead of actually telling me anything. They hired over 30 employees, which seems like too many for a sandwich place, and perhaps they're already weeding them out. I guess if the days pass and I don't hear anything, I'm just going to go collect my paycheck next Friday and be done with it.

  2. #2

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    Thats a terrible position to be in. I just recently started working at Folks Southern Kitchen as a dishwasher and the managers there never gave me my work schedule and told me after my first day to call for my schedule and I called three times and the first 2 times they told me to call back later and on the third time one of the managers gave me a schedule its frustrating but hang in there just a little bit longer. Mabe you should go in person to ask for your schedule because you said they would call you and have not that may be your only option to get your schedule and to see whats going on also when I applied for my job I thought that they would call me for a interview but it turned out that I had to go in person and to check on my aplication I hope this helps Good Luck.

  3. #3

    Default

    Unfortunately, a common problem with these sorts of jobs is getting enough hours. I think a lot of managers see having a larger pool of hours-starved employees as being more reliable than a smaller pool of employees closely matched to the available hours. That way, they hope, an unexpected absence or holiday will quickly be accommodated by somebody who would otherwise be getting only a few hours a day--or less. Best thing you can do, short of finding another job, is prove yourself reliable while hoping that somebody else is a flake. Then, perhaps, the scheduling will shift in your favor.

    But it also sounds like your manager's a bit of a flake. Of course, a new business probably comes with a lot of stress for the owners, but still.

  4. #4

    Default

    Honestly, I can't even remember if I get paid next week or this week. I know we get paid bi-weekly, but the place had already been open a week when I started.

  5. #5

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    They don't sound very good at their job. If it was me, I'd be looking for something more reliable. I realize it's hard to find good jobs. It always took me a while to find something good when I decided to make a change. It's never easy.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by dogboy View Post
    They don't sound very good at their job. If it was me, I'd be looking for something more reliable. I realize it's hard to find good jobs. It always took me a while to find something good when I decided to make a change. It's never easy.
    I'm not necessarily going to agree with this. It sucks for OP but this is a low-skill job with pretty much fuckall for advancement or development. So what if their lack of concern for his needs causes them to lose his services to attrition? They've hired 30 workers- which sounds insane- so they've clearly got room to lose a whole bunch that they don't need. Making sandwiches is a mechanical job. There's little to no incentive for them to avoid employee turnover/churn.

    Contrast the situation to a local bank branch. This is a skilled position so employees are not as easily replaceable. Hiring a new employee requires vetting, background checks, and training. Once that employee is trained and out there, in addition to not wanting to need to go through that process again, banks are acutely aware that people who bank large amounts of money like intelligent, well-trained people with experience and longevity. Last, the people on the teller line today are the pool from which the company is going to find next year's CSRs, the following year's branch managers, and next decade's corporate VPs. The guy making sandwiches doesn't need to be vetted and his training is going to be over and done with in about 30 minutes. If he doesn't work out you'll leave a HELP WANTED sign on the door and find an adequate replacement in a week. And the guy at the sandwich counter isn't going to be made more than what he is now. There isn't a promotion system built in because a sandwich shop doesn't have a corporate hierarchy to fill and even if there was, isn't going to look to its sandwich guys to fill it.

  7. #7

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    Yes, this is true. It reminds me of working as a teacher assistant for our school system. We were supposed to have the equivalent of a two year associates degree, though that sort of got fudged, from what I could see. I had my four year degree so I was at a different class and paid more. Unlike part time work in a sandwich shop, there were only 5 of us and we had to be there every day. If we were sick, we had to call in and sign a paper when we came back to work. We had to punch a time clock as our work was closely watched.

    The upside was that we had full time employment which meant we got the same health care package as the teachers, and we got a pension from the state. Like the bank employee, we were finger printed, vetted with a background check and tested for tuberculosis. The best part of the job was having the summer off, two weeks off for the Christmas holiday and a week for Spring Break. It was hard work, but it was continuous with good job security as long as you did your job well.

  8. #8

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    Pretty much everything AEsahaettr said. Minimum wage jobs are usually high on BS because the reason they are paying minimum wage is an abundance of people willing and capable to do that job. It's a phase most have to go through in their careers. You just have to put up with the BS.

    Eventually you learn a skill, get some experience, and then the tables are somewhat turned.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by dogboy View Post
    They don't sound very good at their job. If it was me, I'd be looking for something more reliable. I realize it's hard to find good jobs. It always took me a while to find something good when I decided to make a change. It's never easy.
    Yeah, I've still been looking around on job sites. The issue is that this is my first paying job since 2013 because I just couldn't get in anywhere else. The wife of a family friend apparently knows the women who's running the place and told her about me looking for work.



    Quote Originally Posted by AEsahaettr View Post
    So what if their lack of concern for his needs causes them to lose his services to attrition?
    I'm a girl.

  10. #10

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by BoundCoder View Post
    Pretty much everything AEsahaettr said. Minimum wage jobs are usually high on BS because the reason they are paying minimum wage is an abundance of people willing and capable to do that job. It's a phase most have to go through in their careers. You just have to put up with the BS.

    Eventually you learn a skill, get some experience, and then the tables are somewhat turned.
    The addendum.... the entry level employee, like our dear Kimba, has an objective here, even if the job and everything about it sucks: Get a line for the resume that says she can hold down a job. It would be better still if you could get a letter or a commendation that tells the next prospective employer "this person shows up on time and works hard rain or shine, is friendly to the customers, etc". Nobody wants to take a chance on a blank slate. That's why they hired 30 when they probably only need less than half that. There are far too many slackers, idiots, and disturbed time bombs wandering around out there.

    So my advice would be, assuming they call you back again, work hard, put a smile on your face, do the best you can for a few months. A good reference can be the difference in getting the next, hopefully better, gig.

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