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Thread: Uk voting on leave being part of Europe or stay in

  1. #1

    Default Uk voting on leave being part of Europe or stay in



    Hi everyone

    so us Brits have to vote if we wont to leave being part of Europe or stay in.

    what do you think we should do. stay in or leave.

    I don't know.

    thanks.

    Sisi



  2. #2

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    I don't think we ever needed a referendum in the first place. Being in the EU has been beneficial to the U.K. socially and economically. This current brinkmanship is simply Cameron (and co.) taking Britain to the cusp of a possible split from Europe, just to try and tap into nationalist fervour and tick off a promise he made to lure far-right voters away from UKIP.

    There was no good reason for our EU membership to be up for debate. As with Thatcher and the Falklands, it's purely a power play by a Tory Prime Minister trying to win support by adopting a bullish foreign policy stance.

  3. #3

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    As an American, I've been reading about this in The Washington Post. The consensus seems to think that if Britain leaves the E. U., it will hurt them economically. There's a feeling that the trading partners, other nations, will be less inclined to trade and do business. They also seem to think the vote will be very close.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by dogboy View Post
    As an American, I've been reading about this in The Washington Post. The consensus seems to think that if Britain leaves the E. U., it will hurt them economically. There's a feeling that the trading partners, other nations, will be less inclined to trade and do business. They also seem to think the vote will be very close.
    The question that I ask in these circumstances is why do people support policies that have a clear economic downside? I'm not totally sure in this case, but my sense is that there's a strong sentiment among the British that the requirements of the EU are onerous for them, even if they're ultimately beneficial. That's understandable in a situation where big economic crises like Greece make it look like the British (and the Germans and some others) are suffering because of other people's reckless policies, whereas the benefits of free trade, shared financial policy, and open travel are felt only in a subtle, dispersed way over time.

  5. #5

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    There more to it go to youtube the migration stuff going on is bad rapes crime going on and the cover up's it's like the EU falling a part 3,000000 unemployed i'n Germany.
    They raped a three year old boy there is so much turmoil over there.
    There are some in the UK that want there country back.

  6. #6

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by ArchieRoni View Post
    The question that I ask in these circumstances is why do people support policies that have a clear economic downside?
    I think in this instance, a large number of British people - primarily Conservative and UKIP voters - are concerned that Britain remaining in the EU will increase the numbers of refugees the government accepts. The amount of refugees which the EU want us to take in is significantly higher than either Cameron or most right-wing voters would like. In fact, there is a sizeable minority of people who say that we should accept no refugees whatsoever.

    Personally I think that housing people who are fleeing from famine, war, FGM, religious persecution and other atrocities is a far better thing than pleasing right-wing voters who have a hypothetical, xenophobic fear about the 'Islamification of Europe'. But that's just one of many reasons why I'd never vote Conservative!

    - - - Updated - - -



    Quote Originally Posted by foxkits View Post
    There more to it go to youtube the migration stuff going on is bad rapes crime going on and the cover up's it's like the EU falling a part 3,000000 unemployed i'n Germany.
    They raped a three year old boy there is so much turmoil over there.
    There are some in the UK that want there country back.
    I live in England, and the only way in which I 'want my country back' is that I want to return to a tolerant, accepting and welcoming Britain. There's always been racism in this country, but following the Second World War, our government took in a huge number of migrants, understanding that they would help the economy, rebuild a troubled country, integrate into society, and add diversity to our region. And that's something I'm deeply proud of.

    It's boneheaded, Islamophobic groups like Britain First which are the thing I find troubling about our island's attitude to refugees. I'm actually quite okay with tolerance, funnily enough!

    In truth, the attitudes and stereotypes in Britain which trouble me most are the ones in your post:

    - A truly shocking (but unsubstantiated) story aimed to whip up fervour against refugees and make them out to be 'barbaric', and abusers, when in truth they're victims.

    - The misconception that immigration harms an economy. In fact, the main reason Scotland has recovered from its economic depression of the 1980s and the death of traditional industry is because of large numbers of skilled labourers from Eastern Europe relocating to the country.

    - Oh, and the idea that rape and crime is somehow a migrant phenomenon is ludicrous. Many of the largest and most high-profile sexual assault and paedophilia cases in Britain in recent years have involved rings of British-born, white men.
    Last edited by Sanch; 23-Feb-2016 at 13:50.

  8. #8

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    What happens when you guys do leave Europe, will you be your own continent now?

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Calico View Post
    What happens when you guys do leave Europe, will you be your own continent now?
    No, we're not literally leaving Europe. The referendum is on whether to leave the European Union, which is just an optional socioeconomic alliance for countries within Europe. Quite a few European nations aren't EU members.

    Leaving the EU would basically sever our relationship with the continent as regards things like trade agreements, but the U.K. would technically still be part of Europe.

  10. #10

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    The Falklands will be staying with us for a long time.

    I don't see any point in debating the politics of this referendum as you can use facts, figures, and fear tactics for either side to win your case such is the very nature of modern politics, I am undecided on which way I will vote but in the end what will be, will be.
    For me however as a dual national it would not particularly affect me if Britain left the European Union, remember we did have a referendum to join in the first place.

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