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Thread: Will these become Valuable?

  1. #1

    Question Will these become Valuable?

    I was wondering, for the last nearly a year now I buy all my movies and such on VHS, and going to various charity-style shops I've found several sealed recordable VHS tapes, as well as some other tapes.

    And I was wondering, do you guys think these will become valuable in the future? Because for the last few years most people have been pretty much desperate to get rid of all their old tapes, and I've bought a few here and there. Currently I have about 400 VHS tapes (most are old tapes my parents recorded and let me use). Here are some pictures of some tapes I think might possibly have slightly more value in them:
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    The first photo is a picture of my collection of sealed recordable VHS tapes. The second and third photos are of one of my X-Files tapes that is still sealed (with its original proof of purchase card thingy ) A couple of my X-Files ones are sealed as well.

    The last photo is interesting because, well, the reason I posted it is because I remember seeing a documentary on tape trading in the 1980's, and when it had a clip talking about the early 80's, it had a shot of a video store with some cassettes that looked exactly like this one. And it just looks more worn that any other recordable tape I own. I was wondering if it might be worth more because of it's possible age of maybe 30+ years (the tape still works perfectly also).

    What do you guys think? Am I buying up tapes for nothing? (I probably won't stop even if I am I love getting them and they go for around 20-50c nowdays)

  2. #2

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    Honestly? No. A die hard X-Files fan might be searching out the obscure VHS releases but they still wouldn't become highly valuable. The blank tapes would be even more worthless, maybe a tiny bit of money to someone wanting a nostalgia fix, but far, far, FAR from them being a gold mine.

    For the sake of comparison, this spring I bought Sonic The Hedgehog, retail version, box, and manual, and it was still only $20. That's a lot more desirable than VHS tapes. your old collection of VHS isn't going to turn into some Antiques Roadshow motherlode even thirty years from now.

    Too gain value something has to be more than old, it has to be rare and desired, VHS tapes are just rare.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by AshleyAshes View Post
    Too gain value something has to be more than old, it has to be rare and desired, VHS tapes are just rare.
    Not even that. You can't even toss them in the trash where I live (legally), you have to take them to a special designated recycling place and pay to get rid of them.

    As for specific recorded programs.... put it on ebay or craigslist and see if anybody bites. Things are worth what someone is willing to pay for them. No more, no less.

  4. #4

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    Given a hundred years or so, they might have become rare enough to be desirable. Try back in 2095 but for best results, have a working VCR as well. Seems like a bad bet unless you've got free, very clean storage for a long time.

  5. #5

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    Oh well, one of my friends has a few old BetaMax tapes that they recorded back in the 80's. I know they would sell for heaps compared to vhs. But I'm still not going to stop buying them I'm pretty much known for wanting things that have no value to anyone else. Besides, maybe I'll show them to future generations and be like "this is what we used to do to record TV shows!"

    I have about 5 or 6 VHS recorders (6 if you count the one in my camcorder), some are newer than others, all working except one I bought in scotland which has since got a broken pinch roller assembly.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Milko View Post
    Oh well, one of my friends has a few old BetaMax tapes that they recorded back in the 80's. I know they would sell for heaps compared to vhs. But I'm still not going to stop buying them I'm pretty much known for wanting things that have no value to anyone else. Besides, maybe I'll show them to future generations and be like "this is what we used to do to record TV shows!"

    I have about 5 or 6 VHS recorders (6 if you count the one in my camcorder), some are newer than others, all working except one I bought in scotland which has since got a broken pinch roller assembly.
    Beta tapes work because they got crushed pretty early in the competition with VHS and because they were actually better, so those who had them were inclined to try to stick with it. You get a much smaller base of product and a dedicated group of enthusiasts and you have the ingredients for some collector's items. VHS tapes were around for decades and the X-Files was a popular program, so you have two strikes against you already and just have to wait a long time for them to become rare.

  7. #7

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    http://canvasprintmaker.blogspot.co....tapes-and.html

    Jeremy Clarkson made a good point in the last showing of Top Gear (two mini-adventures cobbled together from aleady filmed stuff for the now dead series, or form thereof): nobody buys a vintage television [because you have keep banging it and getting up to turn over, etc]
    i think that a lot of pop televisual stuff is going to be the same, except for the quirky things like Beta, which is only quirky because it lost out to VHS.
    Scotch tapes are some of the worst for longevity, with the plastic tape often becoming sticky (yes, i still have some, stashed away; i daren't try them).

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by ade View Post
    http://canvasprintmaker.blogspot.co....tapes-and.html nobody buys a vintage television [because you have keep banging it and getting up to turn over, etc]
    I'd love an old Vintage colour TV from the 70's. I hardly use remotes anyway so I wouldn't miss one. And it'd look great playing my old doctor who's on VHS ^_^ And I'd love like an old Ferguson VideoStar VHS recorder with the piano key buttons Pretty much my dream setup for when I move out of home. I hardly ever watch TV so I wouldn't have a problem there either.

  9. #9

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    Other thing is that VHS deteriorates over time. The tape inside actually builds up mold on it and causes deterioration of the tape itself. They can be restored but would need to be cleaned quite regularly in order to prevent that from happening. I remember having this discussion with an AV technician when we upgraded our TV/surround sound system as our previous one we had for about 15 years (my parents had it when i was very young) ... anyways, he had been involved with restoring and digitalising old VHS and had told us about the difficulties of doing such, especially when people tend not to store their VHS tapes in very good places.

    Plus, nowadays streaming things is far more popular. Heck, even DVD is starting to go out of fashion due to the multitude of streaming services and wide array of digital formats available. I can't remember the last time i even bought a DVD as i tend to stream TV shows. Plus if you look at a lot of those services that do stream, they are already offering these "classical" TV shows in a digital format for people to watch. So this will definitely decrease the value of VHS.

    Unfortunately VHS is not as comparable to records (which still do have a lot of value, particularly if you have the master records).

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zeek61 View Post
    Other thing is that VHS deteriorates over time. The tape inside actually builds up mold on it and causes deterioration of the tape itself. They can be restored but would need to be cleaned quite regularly in order to prevent that from happening. I remember having this discussion with an AV technician when we upgraded our TV/surround sound system as our previous one we had for about 15 years (my parents had it when i was very young) ... anyways, he had been involved with restoring and digitalising old VHS and had told us about the difficulties of doing such, especially when people tend not to store their VHS tapes in very good places.

    Plus, nowadays streaming things is far more popular. Heck, even DVD is starting to go out of fashion due to the multitude of streaming services and wide array of digital formats available. I can't remember the last time i even bought a DVD as i tend to stream TV shows. Plus if you look at a lot of those services that do stream, they are already offering these "classical" TV shows in a digital format for people to watch. So this will definitely decrease the value of VHS.

    Unfortunately VHS is not as comparable to records (which still do have a lot of value, particularly if you have the master records).
    yeah, I have an old PCI capture card in my computer and I am thinking of digitizing my tapes, but I have so many it would take forever and use up so much space on my computer I have taken apart tapes before to clean them and fix them up (once I had a tape that had somehow folded over and twisted on the reel ) I dunno, I'm alright at storing them and sometimes I question people who say tapes will only last like 10-20 years, like I have 30+ year old tapes that work perfectly still.

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