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Thread: Best survival vehicles

  1. #1

    Default Best survival vehicles

    You know I'm curious with the diversity of nationalities here what diffrent countries see as the best BOV (bug out vehicle) now honestly here before long I'm gonna build a new one on a more stable base than my old chevy pickup, I actually bought a surplus 1986 M998 HMMWV (Humvee) non armored one. It has the soft removable top and doors and a cargo tent as well also picked up one of the offroad utility trailers. My uncle in texas nabbed it for me so I haven't seen it yet. But honestly while it is a extreme duty reliable vehicle I am concerned about a few things like parts and such. But to the topic at hand from a geographic stand point what is the vehicle of choice for any apocalypse, or even natural disaster situation and why you would use it.

    In america I still stand by my old 1982 chevy pickup 4x4. Reasons being simple, durable, cheap, easy parts. The standard chevy 5.7 V8 is extremely popular engine, also it life span started in the 1950s and is still in 2015 chevys . Minor changes over the years but II can still gut a 2007 5.7 and put them in a 1960 5.7 and it will run perfectly. The block has not changed since 1962 and any chevy with a SBC (small block chevy) can bolt in any SBC configuration from a 5.0 305 to a 5.7 350 even the rare SBC 400 ci engine. They all have 100% identical bolt patterns so I can pull any engine or transmission out of any chevy and it will bolt into my pick up as if it were designed for the truck. Also I run two Dana 60 axles my axle setup is very simple it is an standard open diff with Minor mig TAC welds to lock it. They strong enough to lock the axles and pull me out but weak enough the break loose and go back to standard Open Diff before destroying the rest of the axle. As for transmission. It has a "rock crusher" 4 speed manual rated at 800hp and over 1000 ft lbs torque with no syncros. It's been stripped down to bare basics if a syncros goes out the trans is almost useless removing allowed me to not have to worry about them but it also takes a special driving skill to use properly but allows the ability to float gears both up and down saving the clutch from wear and risk of "drop shatter" on the clutch plates. All these parts are easy to find and real popular. I've done minor things like onboard air compressor and electric generator run off a PTO on the trans. And also over years I've put in a mig welder and capped the bed then installed canopy on either side and waterproofed the engine with a snorkle and a secondary intake I rigged myself (my PTO will pump air from the filtered exaust into a tank then back into the engine the truck will run for 30 minutes 100% submerged off just the air compressor air tank and recycled exaust untill the air quality chokes out the combustion) But that's the basis.

    What in yall areas are considered the vehicles of choice vs terain and avalibility of parts.

    Edit:
    As I read over this I realised while explaining the meat and bones of the truck I left out a few main Important items that I will not go in the woods without. The truck has a tripple winch setup on it. It's got a 18,000 lb cable winch up front, and a 12,000 lb cable in the rear bumper, also a 6,000 lb winch bolted in the front of the bed up by the cab to haul in heavy cargo without extra work or to use as a secondary if the main bumper line is in use. also I have a heavily suped up Galaxy DX959B peaked and tuned also a legit "Flamethrower" mod (basicly flamethrower mod for this radio is replacing a few components with higher quality components that also clean up the audio and boost the base swing) . I have it plugged into a linier amp running a variable output from base of 125 watts to excess of 1100 watts (normally illegal by fcc regs but through the search and rescue programs I contract the truck to in severe weather situations the linier was approved and installed for emergency situations to boost my swing to around the 65-85 mile range in heavy wooded valley.) I'm looking to obtain a amatur radio licence so I can ditch the linier and just run a Ham radio with more legal range.
    Last edited by w0lfpack91; 26-Jul-2015 at 02:41.

  2. #2

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    It's a great side hobby, I love building trucks and I love camping. I have used it for its Bug out purposes twice. We had two major winter storms roll through two years back to back knocked out power in my neighborhood for two months before repairs could be made. I was able to run my mobile home off that truck I was the only person in the trailer park with heat and electricity. I also use it as an off road roadside repair and the sherriff contracts it for training and serious search and rescue. BOV trucks while made for extreme scenarios of life and death can be adapted to ANY situation if they are built correctly.
    Last edited by HogansHeroes; 26-Jul-2015 at 09:12. Reason: removing quote of deleted post

  3. #3

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    I have an old, 1996 Jeep Cherokee. I've driven across streams and plowed through muddy fields in that thing when I played in a very good wedding rock band. We played in some of the damnest outdoor gigs. It also got my through a lot of snow since I live next to the Shenandoah Mountains.

  4. #4

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    Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	24501 this is the pic my uncle sent when he went to the auction, it was the display but they had 7 more identical to this with varying milage and damage I got one of the listed ones he said he will send me a pic of MY actual Humvee when the DOD clearance is aproved for his truck and trailer to be on the surplus yard and he goes and picks it and the trailer up should be later this week.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by dogboy View Post
    I have an old, 1996 Jeep Cherokee. I've driven across streams and plowed through muddy fields in that thing when I played in a very good wedding rock band. We played in some of the damnest outdoor gigs. It also got my through a lot of snow since I live next to the Shenandoah Mountains.
    Man I love those old Cherokees . Minor mods and you can't kill them. Was it the 4 cyl. Or the 6 cyl. ?

  6. #6

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    I'm a fellow survivalist but mainly prepare for economic downturns and bushfires. The bushfires being the biggest threat and the economic crash in Australia being inevitable since we didn't go into recession in the GFC. For the bushfire I'm pretty skilled as I'm a volunteer firefighter, and the economic side I generally just grow my own food. It's cheaper anyway, healthier and having chickens is fun for my dogs.

    As to your vehicle, for short term disaster it seems pretty solid. I'm not an expert on snow but it would be decent in floods too (not that I advise crossing flood water ever) Humvee's aren't really available in Australia except through specialist sale yards and I personally don't like fuel guzzlers in disasters since if you fart loudly oil companies put the price up. In a disaster, the fuel price just goes stupid. (Speaking from a minor cyclone) Plus, Australian fuel is about 1.6 times more expensive than the US and you couldn't afford to use it in every day life to drive to work. In a disaster, if you had to leave the area, it is a minimum of 1 hour drive and up to 2 days drive to get to locations such as the nearest capital city. 9 hours to get to my favourite camping spot.

    I prefer the Ford Maverick and Nissan Patrol 90s models. They're exactly the same vehicle but with a different badge. Cheap parts, impossible to destroy and can crawl over anything from sand dunes, to steep rocky descents.. I wouldn't get outside the 90s because they start adding computers which makes them impossible to repair. Failing that, the Nissan Navara is a good one as well.

    The main terrains are desert, flood waters and forest since we don't have any snow. The important thing is for vehicles to be able to withstand running in the heat and lots and lots of dust. Many foreign cars die in the Australian desert due to these two things.

    For the people who don't believe in learning survival skills. It's not about preparing for the apocalypse or nuclear war but for things that are likely to happen in your area. In Australia in 2009 over 200 people died as they weren't prepared for the bushfires. Last year a major bushfire came within 600 metres of my home and over 50 people lost their lives. Luckily, our government has pushed survival plans heavily since 2009 and no-one lost their lives except one person who had a heart attack. People were prepared, people surived. (Most West Aussies have heard "Prepare, Act, Survive" a lot)

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aidy View Post
    I'm a fellow survivalist but mainly prepare for economic downturns and bushfires. The bushfires being the biggest threat and the economic crash in Australia being inevitable since we didn't go into recession in the GFC. For the bushfire I'm pretty skilled as I'm a volunteer firefighter, and the economic side I generally just grow my own food. It's cheaper anyway, healthier and having chickens is fun for my dogs.

    As to your vehicle, for short term disaster it seems pretty solid. I'm not an expert on snow but it would be decent in floods too (not that I advise crossing flood water ever) Humvee's aren't really available in Australia except through specialist sale yards and I personally don't like fuel guzzlers in disasters since if you fart loudly oil companies put the price up. In a disaster, the fuel price just goes stupid. (Speaking from a minor cyclone) Plus, Australian fuel is about 1.6 times more expensive than the US and you couldn't afford to use it in every day life to drive to work. In a disaster, if you had to leave the area, it is a minimum of 1 hour drive and up to 2 days drive to get to locations such as the nearest capital city. 9 hours to get to my favourite camping spot.

    I prefer the Ford Maverick and Nissan Patrol 90s models. They're exactly the same vehicle but with a different badge. Cheap parts, impossible to destroy and can crawl over anything from sand dunes, to steep rocky descents.. I wouldn't get outside the 90s because they start adding computers which makes them impossible to repair. Failing that, the Nissan Navara is a good one as well.

    The main terrains are desert, flood waters and forest since we don't have any snow. The important thing is for vehicles to be able to withstand running in the heat and lots and lots of dust. Many foreign cars die in the Australian desert due to these two things.

    For the people who don't believe in learning survival skills. It's not about preparing for the apocalypse or nuclear war but for things that are likely to happen in your area. In Australia in 2009 over 200 people died as they weren't prepared for the bushfires. Last year a major bushfire came within 600 metres of my home and over 50 people lost their lives. Luckily, our government has pushed survival plans heavily since 2009 and no-one lost their lives except one person who had a heart attack. People were prepared, people surived. (Most West Aussies have heard "Prepare, Act, Survive" a lot)
    Yeah i dont see government breakdown likely in any developed nation. And as for "world war 3" (as most preppers in my area like base stuff off of) also not likely in my book. When i built my chevy pick up i mainly focused on short term survivabillity in extreme situations as i encountered new situations my truck has grown and adapted first winter strom we had power went out for 1 month i took the truck to a camping area i know of with natural sheilding after the storm and we got back to normal i adapted the PTO and generators and tinkered with it to push the output high enough in AC voltage and amps to run my whole trailer at the worst of times. Storm 2 i hunkered down in my home and switched the plug from the utility line to the generator on the truck and it ran fine for the whole two months the storm lasted. The secondary intake is kinda a prototype i half engineered/half copied and it came about a year or so ago we were in flood watch, being right on a major river its a major issue and notmality in this area, i tried to cross a flooded area because i was surrounded in a low lying area waters were rising so i took the chance and just bounded right in got about 20 miniutes in and the front just dipped, dunked the snorkel and the engine got a big gulp down the intake. And stalled out lucily with the winches i just spooled out the rear and disconcted the cable used it as a extension of the front and yanked myself to the nearest shallow area and ripped the heads off and drained the cylinders then slaped them back on quick not great but it was enough to get it started again and hauled out. After that i looked into limited air recycling in engines same as a diesel submarine just more primitive works on the principle of a EGR valve in a car on a more extreme and large scale and the best air scrubber i could afford first 20 min the truck will run 100% self contained at max power between 21 min, and the 1 hour mark it looses air quality and power fast i cap running at 30 min even though it will run to an hour its by no means got enough power to pull itself on anything other than flat land. I conserve the last 30 min to idleing to be able to still have power to swing the linier at max range to call for help o tried the linier with out the motor running pushing all 1100 watts could only key up three times before the truck would not start.

  8. #8

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    Your lucky you were able to get a humvee! Be careful about that 6.5 diesel though. My Dad has a 2000 Flat bed and the 6.5 seems to be breaking down at least once a month and its either dire or the dealer has their head up their *** because they can't seem to fix it and it's been in the shop for a month now! Also I want pics of your truck! and last I don't think GM makes the 350 anymore and I don't even know if they have anything between the 5.3 and the 6.0 but I would love to know!

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by w0lfpack91 View Post
    You know I'm curious with the diversity of nationalities here what diffrent countries see as the best BOV (bug out vehicle) ...
    you americans
    nobody else in the rest of the world has any idea what a 'bug out vehicle' is

    for Europe, an additional cultural and historical factor revolves around the notion of land ownership and freedom of movement within such lands. so, in lands where the folk of those lands have no legal claim to their land, bugging out is the preserve of the landed wealthy (or what usually transpires as foreigners to that land; the so-called british monarchy being a good example). do anything remotely independent of the state and the police or the army will come and kidnap or kill you (Google 'ashya king' for a recent example).

    and so, in such light, there are many limitations as to what you can do if the shit hits the socio-technological fan and it breaks.
    around our end, there are lots of wind turbines (on seized common land, btw) and one bloke has his own, which he's had since the 90s. while i'm tempted for such, i'd be doing it on the sly and on a budget and, since the governement has stolen the reuse and recycle gig (meaning that i no longer have free access to things like washing-machine motors, for the generators), it's an even lesser prospect.

    i bought an invertor, to be powered by my car, a while ago; it's only 300W, but i reckoned on that being most apt for running the engine at tick-over. anything else means modification and expense. still, i can power the central heating, my heat lamp (at only 100W it makes a surprising difference) and/or a television (but who'd need that?).
    i'm tempted to up the ante, but that would also include fitting a radiator inside the house, to be connected to the car's cooling system (i nose-up to where it'd be fitted anyway), but mum won't have it.

    you can see that i've thought about such things, especially after reviewing and pricing up the stand-alone generators/invertors on the UK market; if you've got a car with an engine, use that: it's quieter and more reliable than owt else.

    my car's all set for snow and ice and some off-roading (how many Saxo VTRs can say that?), and flooding isn't an issue where i live (despite what insurers say: sure, our local river is only 250ft-ish away, but we're also 150ft above it!).
    given the restrictions of law and cost, there's not much else i can do, save keeping the lawless options in mind

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Experiment626 View Post
    Your lucky you were able to get a humvee! Be careful about that 6.5 diesel though. My Dad has a 2000 Flat bed and the 6.5 seems to be breaking down at least once a month and its either dire or the dealer has their head up their *** because they can't seem to fix it and it's been in the shop for a month now! Also I want pics of your truck! and last I don't think GM makes the 350 anymore and I don't even know if they have anything between the 5.3 and the 6.0 but I would love to know!
    Yeah i wont keep the factory diesel i have a tricked out 1981 cummins i been building for the chevy its tripple induction, high end turbo, low range turbo, and a base centrifical blower to pick up any slack and help reduce lag. Also rigged a dry sump for better ground clearence. While the 6.5 is a good motor id rather have the cummins for the ease of parts and repairs also if i have ti run an auto i like the cummins three stage Jake. Yes they still make the 5.7 idk if its in any production modles but its still widely produced, and the current LS generations still runs the SBC config, so their parts are still viable. But even still with a 50+ year production run its the most viable engine configuration. That being said i hate GM and Chevy in general. FORD FTW!!! but i cant argure with the avalibillity of parts and simplicity of repairs




    Quote Originally Posted by ade View Post
    you americans
    nobody else in the rest of the world has any idea what a 'bug out vehicle' is

    for Europe, an additional cultural and historical factor revolves around the notion of land ownership and freedom of movement within such lands. so, in lands where the folk of those lands have no legal claim to their land, bugging out is the preserve of the landed wealthy (or what usually transpires as foreigners to that land; the so-called british monarchy being a good example). do anything remotely independent of the state and the police or the army will come and kidnap or kill you (Google 'ashya king' for a recent example).

    and so, in such light, there are many limitations as to what you can do if the shit hits the socio-technological fan and it breaks.
    around our end, there are lots of wind turbines (on seized common land, btw) and one bloke has his own, which he's had since the 90s. while i'm tempted for such, i'd be doing it on the sly and on a budget and, since the governement has stolen the reuse and recycle gig (meaning that i no longer have free access to things like washing-machine motors, for the generators), it's an even lesser prospect.

    i bought an invertor, to be powered by my car, a while ago; it's only 300W, but i reckoned on that being most apt for running the engine at tick-over. anything else means modification and expense. still, i can power the central heating, my heat lamp (at only 100W it makes a surprising difference) and/or a television (but who'd need that?).
    i'm tempted to up the ante, but that would also include fitting a radiator inside the house, to be connected to the car's cooling system (i nose-up to where it'd be fitted anyway), but mum won't have it.

    you can see that i've thought about such things, especially after reviewing and pricing up the stand-alone generators/invertors on the UK market; if you've got a car with an engine, use that: it's quieter and more reliable than owt else.

    my car's all set for snow and ice and some off-roading (how many Saxo VTRs can say that?), and flooding isn't an issue where i live (despite what insurers say: sure, our local river is only 250ft-ish away, but we're also 150ft above it!).
    given the restrictions of law and cost, there's not much else i can do, save keeping the lawless options in mind
    Lol the american bov i admit is usually a bit extreme but we also have the least amount of government restrictions of most the developed nations and can get pretty redonkulous in configuration up to and including millitary grade equipment. However i still use the term in the extent of if all heck broke loose like natural disaster or even just an evacuation in your area what would be the go to vehicle you trust to get you safely from a danger area to saftey not nessicarrily apocolypse prep type

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