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Thread: Dolls with disabilities

  1. #1

    Default Dolls with disabilities

    Perhaps someone stumbled across some news about it already. I'm curious what you're thinking about it. Especially since we have some members with different kinds of disabilites.

    In short:
    A british toymaker company was contacted at the beginning of this month by the organizers of the "Toy Like Me" campaign and asked them if they could add disability associated accessories to their customized dolls.
    So Makies, that certain line of dolls namely, has introduced various additions to its collection so that dolls can now be purchased with walking canes, hearing aids, glasses or facial birthmarks. The line soon will expand to include wheelchairs.

    In general, the campaign tried to encourage parents of disabled children to send Facebook messages and to tweet to companies like Hasbro, Lego and Mattel, in an effort to create more inclusive toy lines.

    So far it has received a lot of positive feedback (Link: Toymaker launches 3D-printed disabled doll range)


    However, on the other hand some parents seem to be a bit furious about dolls that try to reflect disabilities.
    While the manufacturers claim such dolls, which are finding a growing market so far, help ‘normalise’ conditions like Down’s syndrome so young sufferers don’t feel so different from their friends - and while many parents of disabled children have welcomed the dolls as a realistic alternative to the physical perfection of the Baby Annabells already on the market - some dismiss them as a sick joke. In fact, their detractors believe they only emphasise a disabled child’s differences to their able-bodied friends (Link: Parents' fury at 'Down's Syndrome dolls' designed to help children deal with disability).



    Personally I think it's okay? Surely there may be a small line, in which I mean that dolls should look rather cute instead of forcing down a certain message;- a wheelchair and anything similar is fine. Since in the end this wouldn't even have that much of a chance on the market. While it may also emphasize a bit of a negative image.
    On the other hand if those dolls look somewhat sweet and those added disabilities come across as acessoires... that's great, isn't it?
    Although I may be seeing it through rose colored glasses, but I think they do look pretty, much more than my old Malibu Barbie as far as I remember her. Despite that I wanted to have one badly as a child. I guess that's why she ended up getting eaten by my plushie dinosaur...
    Anyway, if dolls may have an impact, then this is the right one surely. Instead of the repeatedly discussed unrealistic standard of beauty.



    What's your opinion: Is it okay or is it absolute overkill?
    Is there just a small line that should not be crossed as such in case of not making those dolls too different? Or is this on the other hand only avoiding the harsh truth?

  2. #2

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    I like the concept of making diverse dolls. If a parent feels the doll doesn't reflect their child, they don't have to buy it. But having them on the market reflects the diversity of the people buying them.

  3. #3

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    Only in the 21st century does this become an issue. The solution seems obvious. Let companies market them and let parents decide if they want to buy one. Who should know their child better than the parent. If the child wants one, get it for them. If not, don't.

    So here's my question. If you had a child who was a bed wetter, would you buy them a Betsy Wetsy doll?

  4. #4

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    I think they are perfectly fine. I love many many dollies, and these seem quite lovely too! They might not be exactly the same as some of the others but I don't think that makes them any less interesting. I think all sorts of dolls, diverse in shapes and sizes and everything make a doll collection that much more fun and interesting.
    Last edited by gigglemuffinz; 27-May-2015 at 05:12.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by dogboy View Post
    Only in the 21st century does this become an issue. The solution seems obvious. Let companies market them and let parents decide if they want to buy one. Who should know their child better than the parent. If the child wants one, get it for them. If not, don't.

    So here's my question. If you had a child who was a bed wetter, would you buy them a Betsy Wetsy doll?
    I'd follow your model. If I had a child who wanted who ("she's just like me!") then sure. If it didn't appeal, then I wouldn't.

  6. #6

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    That seems like an awesome idea! I mean, imagine how awesome itd be to buy a doll with hearing aids or a cochlear implant! (I'm not deaf but I have family who is) Or what about a cute little hunchback doll, or a doll that has an issue with their eyes. I mean - why is it such a problem? They sell anatomically correct dolls, dolls with glasses, and dolls of different ethnicities, so why not dolls with other issues? That little Downs doll is so cute for one! And I would literally die if they started making Transgender dolls, on the topic of "different" dolls... Like not even kidding, it'd be awesome!

    Let's put it this way - I have an OC who wears a cochlear implant. If I wanted to, I'd make a toy of her, implant and all. The same with any of my other OCs, I'd make toys of them with their issues.

    One last thing - Derpy... There was a huge issue ages ago about her, because of her eyes. Why is that such a bug issue? I mean, she's just got odd eyes is all.

    ...so where can I buy one of those dolls anyway?

  7. #7

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    Well it better then Way too skinny Barbie. Then Advertise it to kids who have weight problem. I think the Different dolls is a good idea.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by daLira View Post
    Perhaps someone stumbled across some news about it already. I'm curious what you're thinking about it. Especially since we have some members with different kinds of disabilites.

    In short:
    A british toymaker company was contacted at the beginning of this month by the organizers of the "Toy Like Me" campaign and asked them if they could add disability associated accessories to their customized dolls.
    So Makies, that certain line of dolls namely, has introduced various additions to its collection so that dolls can now be purchased with walking canes, hearing aids, glasses or facial birthmarks. The line soon will expand to include wheelchairs.

    In general, the campaign tried to encourage parents of disabled children to send Facebook messages and to tweet to companies like Hasbro, Lego and Mattel, in an effort to create more inclusive toy lines.

    So far it has received a lot of positive feedback (Link: Toymaker launches 3D-printed disabled doll range)


    However, on the other hand some parents seem to be a bit furious about dolls that try to reflect disabilities.
    While the manufacturers claim such dolls, which are finding a growing market so far, help ‘normalise’ conditions like Down’s syndrome so young sufferers don’t feel so different from their friends - and while many parents of disabled children have welcomed the dolls as a realistic alternative to the physical perfection of the Baby Annabells already on the market - some dismiss them as a sick joke. In fact, their detractors believe they only emphasise a disabled child’s differences to their able-bodied friends (Link: Parents' fury at 'Down's Syndrome dolls' designed to help children deal with disability).



    Personally I think it's okay? Surely there may be a small line, in which I mean that dolls should look rather cute instead of forcing down a certain message;- a wheelchair and anything similar is fine. Since in the end this wouldn't even have that much of a chance on the market. While it may also emphasize a bit of a negative image.
    On the other hand if those dolls look somewhat sweet and those added disabilities come across as acessoires... that's great, isn't it?
    Although I may be seeing it through rose colored glasses, but I think they do look pretty, much more than my old Malibu Barbie as far as I remember her. Despite that I wanted to have one badly as a child. I guess that's why she ended up getting eaten by my plushie dinosaur...
    Anyway, if dolls may have an impact, then this is the right one surely. Instead of the repeatedly discussed unrealistic standard of beauty.



    What's your opinion: Is it okay or is it absolute overkill?
    Is there just a small line that should not be crossed as such in case of not making those dolls too different? Or is this on the other hand only avoiding the harsh truth?
    I can see the parents argument, but I think this is a good idea really, there is a bit of an unrealistic standard of beauty in western culture, and some kids need to be reminded that there perfect just the way they are, still there is a point of going too far, and they could create a negative impact, but as they say only time will tell,

    Also if I may add I'm working on a book about a Teenage Austisic superhero, to help younger people on the autism spectrum know that things do get better which I hope I will have a good impact, and even turn into a movie, or something and hopefully will have a good impact.

  9. #9

    Default

    I think it's wonderful idea. It's just one more way of teaching the younger generation about diversity in our culture. I hope they will sell well.

    This reminds me of the Canadian content of Sesame Street when they brought in a hearing impaired boy as a regular cast member. The point was to show that there were some youth with disabilities and that it was a normal part of life. On the other hand, I'm still waiting for Bert and Ernie to come out of the closet.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by KittyninjaW View Post
    I can see the parents argument, but I think this is a good idea really, there is a bit of an unrealistic standard of beauty in western culture, and some kids need to be reminded that there perfect just the way they are, still there is a point of going too far, and they could create a negative impact, but as they say only time will tell,

    Also if I may add I'm working on a book about a Teenage Austisic superhero, to help younger people on the autism spectrum know that things do get better which I hope I will have a good impact, and even turn into a movie, or something and hopefully will have a good impact.
    You too? Lol awesome! One of my heroes is an autistic girl with multiple personalities. (I also have a Trans boy who's autistic in my novel, but that's different since hes not a hero) Please tell me more, I'm really interested in hearing about it.

    - - - Updated - - -



    Quote Originally Posted by Starrunner View Post
    I think it's wonderful idea. It's just one more way of teaching the younger generation about diversity in our culture. I hope they will sell well.

    This reminds me of the Canadian content of Sesame Street when they brought in a hearing impaired boy as a regular cast member. The point was to show that there were some youth with disabilities and that it was a normal part of life. On the other hand, I'm still waiting for Bert and Ernie to come out of the closet.

    Avenue Q does a parody of bert and Ernie sorta... I know it's not the same but still... And I don't think they will for some time, not until it becomes more readily accepted (if they do at all... I have no problem with it, but the last thing I wanna do is offend the creator/original voices)

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