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Thread: Rape Culture Hysteria dismantled.

  1. #1

    Default Rape Culture Hysteria dismantled.

    Been getting more and more frustrated with the SJW and modern feminist movement especially on the topic of rape and the idea of rape culture. When all it does is fundamentally distract from the problem by focusing on one that doesn't exist

    This quote for me summarizes my views on it.
    "Rape culture ideology is terribly sick and it trivializes actual victims of sexual violence. We cannot keep sticking our heads in the sand and just blaming this “rape culture” bullshit instead of looking for the actual sources and solutions to the horrible problem of rape and sexual violence."

    What is super irritating though is its pretty much been debunked by organisations like RAINN (american organization) yet its ignored or twisted to meed the SJW agenda.


    Source for info below:
    https://rainn.org/images/03-2014/WH-...mendations.pdf


    Perpetrators of Campus Sexual Assault: What We Know

    In the last few years, there has been an unfortunate trend towards blaming “rape culture”
    for the extensive problem of sexual violence on campuses. While it is helpful to point out
    the systemic barriers to addressing the problem, it is important to not lose sight of a simple
    fact: Rape is caused not by cultural factors but by the conscious decisions, of a small
    percentage of the community, to commit a violent crime.
    While that may seem an obvious point, it has tended to get lost in recent debates. This has
    led to an inclination to focus on particular segments of the student population (e.g.,
    athletes), particular aspects of campus culture (e.g., the Greek system), or traits that are
    common in many millions of law-abiding Americans (e.g., “masculinity”), rather than on the
    subpopulation at fault: those who choose to commit rape. This trend has the paradoxical
    effect of making it harder to stop sexual violence, since it removes the focus from the
    individual at fault, and seemingly mitigates personal responsibility for his or her own actions.
    By the time they reach college, most students have been exposed to 18 years of prevention
    messages, in one form or another. Thanks to repeated messages from parents, religious
    leaders, teachers, coaches, the media and, yes, the culture at large, the overwhelming
    majority of these young adults have learned right from wrong, and enter college knowing
    that rape falls squarely in the latter category.
    Research supports the view that to focus solely on certain social groups or “types” of
    students in the effort to end campus sexual violence is a mistake. Dr. David Lisak estimates
    that three percent of college men are responsible for more than 90% of rapes.iii
    Other
    studies suggest that between 3-7% of college men have committed an act of sexual violence
    or would consider doing so. It is this relatively small percentage of the population, which
    has proven itself immune to years of prevention messages, that we must address in other
    ways. (Unfortunately, we are not aware of reliable research on female college perpetrators.)

  2. #2

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    I agree that rape is committed by individuals, but as with almost any crime, social factors play their part.

    We live in a society where pornography is readily available to young people, and a large amount of that material shows women as being dominated and under the sexual control of men. Society has massive double standards about sex - women are demonised as 'sluts' if they have sex with multiple people, whilst with men (at least in the UK), it's generally considered a normal and even macho thing to do.

    There's also a big amount of material online which tells men that a girlfriend/wife is essentially the right of any man worth anything - this is an extremely dangerous message, which teaches young men that they have a natural right to a woman's body and to her decision-making, and causes insecurity and anger if they end up alone. If it sounds like I'm talking hypothetically, these are exactly the kind of sources Elliot Rodger name-checked and was inspired by, visible on sites like Return of Kings and PUA Hate.

    I agree that rape culture doesn't create a potential rapist, but it increases the likelihood of that person offending, by giving them a sense of imagined entitlement to sex, which, if frustrated, can and has lead to the sexual assault and rape of women.

    Note: The above points focus on sexual assaults and rape on women, because I believe rape culture fuels an objectification and dehumanisation of women. Men are raped as well, which is obviously an equally serious and traumatic experience, but I don't feel that there are equivalent cultural factors which significantly increase the likelihood of men being victims of rape.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by SirNapsALot View Post
    I agree that rape is committed by individuals, but as with almost any crime, social factors play their part.
    That last part is super generalized its hard to agree or disagree with it based on that.


    I agree that rape culture doesn't create a potential rapist, but it increases the likelihood of that person offending, by giving them a sense of imagined entitlement to sex, which, if frustrated, can and has lead to the sexual assault and rape of women.
    I have to inherently disagree, though im not sure what 'creates' a rapist. The sourced information literally says that it doesnt and that there is a small percentage of the population that will rape and the idea of rape culture is making rape more difficult to deal with. That the preventative measures once people pushed by the rape culture doesn't actually help prevention.
    Its nearly as useful as the war on drugs.


    Note: The above points focus on sexual assaults and rape on women, because I believe rape culture fuels an objectification and dehumanisation of women.
    Can you source this or is it merely opinion ?


    Men are raped as well, which is obviously an equally serious and traumatic experience, but I don't feel that there are equivalent cultural factors which significantly increase the likelihood of men being victims of rape.
    In the US about 10% of rape victims are male, but its been very hard to classify female on male rape as many places only consider it rape if penetration occurs. So the numbers are considered to be lower than what actually occurs and similar to females very few people are willing to come forward about it.
    I could even suggest that because of the lack of support and social pressures for men in these instances the number of men not coming forward could be far greater than current predictions.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by SchrodingersSpy View Post
    Can you source this or is it merely opinion ?
    Well, you can't expect to find stats on how objectification of women fuels rape culture, because offenders would be unwilling or oblivious in answering questions on their underlying motives for rape. However, there are some good articles on this:

    http://thehumanist.com/commentary/ti...ure-does-exist
    http://msmagazine.com/blog/2012/07/1...-rape-culture/
    http://www.safercampus.org/blog/2012...-rape-culture/

    There's scientific studies on the link between objectification and dehumanisation of women and rape culture as well. If you were interested, I can have a hunt... I just thought these were a few interesting articles which did a good job of covering those underlying factors of rape culture.
    Last edited by Sanch; 28-Oct-2014 at 10:58.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by SirNapsALot View Post
    There's scientific studies on the link between objectification and dehumanisation of women and rape culture as well. If you were interested, I can have a hunt...
    Thanks for the links.
    I will search myself but really i feel the science on it isnt really science, not that it should be ignored but it really its impossible to test it using any scientific methodology.


    Also Just found this, which brings up how under reported male rape and the possible reality of it.

    http://www.slate.com/articles/double...assaulted.html

    and an Australia government body the Australian Centre for the Study of Sexual Assault,
    Puts male rape in Australia at 20% and still says its under reported and much higher and that the reporting rate is going up over 1% each year and the paper was from 2006.
    http://www.aifs.gov.au/acssa/pubs/wrap/w2.html

  6. #6

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    Part of the problem is in how we are redefining "rape". One of the reasons men enter into relationships with women is to have sex, and they will be inclined to put some form of pressure on their partner to achieve this goal. The question is in how much pressure is allowed before it is considered rape. I assume we are in agreement where violence, or the threat of violence, is involved. The real issue is consent, and for years now the rallying cry has been "no means no". The new slogan is "yes means yes", but both approaches will break down to "he said, she said". Unless we agree to have witnesses to our sex acts and BAC tests before hand, the government cannot successfully regulate the intimate details of romantic relationships. I agree that attempting to do this would, to some extent, distract from focusing on individuals who commit sexual violence.

    One of the statistics you mention is very troubling, if true, and would support the notion of a "rape culture". If 3% of college men are inclined towards sexual violence, that is a pretty significant number when you consider how many potential victims would be involved over the years.

  7. #7

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    If a woman is robbed, the police will investigate. If they catch the thief, they'll return the woman's things, have a trial and put the thief in jail.

    If a woman is raped, the police often choose not to investigate, or the accusation won't be brought to the police at all. If there is an investigation, there is no way to "return" what was taken. If there is a trial, it will frequently focus on the woman's dress and mannerisms. This will supposedly be to demonstrate consent, but will quite often be nothing short of calling her a whore. Even if the jury sides with her, all her friends and associates will forever more look upon her with repulsion and derision.

    When people talk about rape culture, that's where it comes from. And it needs to be changed.

  8. #8

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    I'm sorry, but rape culture exists and is a horrible thing which needs to be stopped in its tracks.

  9. #9

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    JewelSparkles - i totally agree with that. - i have been told that there is a rising "anti-feminist" sentiment on college campuses as well. - The new "Yes Means Yes" legislation in California is an attempt to counter, or control that, and to change the culture on college campuses.

    Yet, i am not sure that will work until a change in culture occurs. - Women not only need to learn to say "Yes" and "No", they need to learn to exercize their own choices by initiating encounters, to ASKING politely, and being prepared to hear "NO" in response from the man.

    Until that happens, "Yes Means Yes" is just another impossible and one-sided legal liability for the average decent man that probably won't stop rapists, even if it helps to convict them.

    Men and women need to learn how to treat one another with equality, and many young college aged people now feel that "the ball is in the women's court".

    Its time for young women to put the big girl panties on and put away the boxing gloves ? - NOT saying "Yes", now means "No", or even, "How Dare You Ask ?"

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by ArchieRoni View Post
    If a woman is robbed, the police will investigate. If they catch the thief, they'll return the woman's things, have a trial and put the thief in jail.

    If a woman is raped, the police often choose not to investigate, or the accusation won't be brought to the police at all. If there is an investigation, there is no way to "return" what was taken. If there is a trial, it will frequently focus on the woman's dress and mannerisms. This will supposedly be to demonstrate consent, but will quite often be nothing short of calling her a whore. Even if the jury sides with her, all her friends and associates will forever more look upon her with repulsion and derision.

    When people talk about rape culture, that's where it comes from. And it needs to be changed.
    That's interesting. I've always been under the impression that rape culture was this idea that our culture is weirdly permissive of rape, or even cultivates rapists, which is kind of a far-fetched claim imo. What you're saying is actually reasonable-sounding.



    Quote Originally Posted by JewelSparkles View Post
    I'm sorry, but rape culture exists and is a horrible thing which needs to be stopped in its tracks.
    I'm sure you're convinced of this, but the rest of us might not be so convinced. Perhaps actually elaborating upon or supporting your claims might help bring people over to your cause?

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