Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Different PH Balance in liquid

  1. #1

    Default Different PH Balance in liquid

    ok so I did a science measurement with an Abena M4 and for some weird reason it would seem that water is heavier than urine which I don't understand.

    Urine has all these chemicals inside and it's slightly less dense than water but water is a regular liquid and doesn't penetrate the cotton as well as urine does but water definitely makes it heavier. Urine penetrates the cotton but can hold alot more than water can.

    It would seem to everyone there is no difference but to me I might have found a clue!

    A regular Abena M4 can hold 65oz and I poured 2 Pints(32oz) 1 each(16oz) of urine and water into both Abenas and the water quickly spread all over while urine absorbed more quickly. I guess there is a Chemical in the Urine that would make it penetrate into the cotton than water but what is that Chemical? Does anyone know?

  2. #2

    Default

    I wonder, would the result change if you altered the ph of the water sample to match the ph of the urine sample?
    Also, were both samples the same temperature when you tried this ?
    Last edited by starpup; 08-Jul-2014 at 23:24. Reason: spelling

  3. #3

    Default

    idk why would I check Urine temp? Handling that is kinda messed up and the water is luke warm like 80* and Urine has all these chemicals that water doesn't and I am looking for that one chemical that makes the urine liquid penetrate more than water.

  4. #4

    Default

    Temperature will efect absorption rates.
    id start with both liquids at the same ph and same temperature them see.
    a surfactant will alter the waters absorbtion rate, so try adding a drop of detergent to the water?

  5. #5

    Default

    The pH of urine when it exits the body should be more or less neutral. It isn't until bacteria start metabolizing compounds in the urine that its pH starts to become a factor.

    What urine has that your tap water doesn't is "salt." How much salt your urine has depends on a number of factors, including your dietary intake and how dehydrated you have been.

    Salt reduces the rate at which super-absorbent polymers (SAPs) can absorb water. When you flood a diaper with pure water, SAP crystals rapidly absorb the water and swell up, forming a water-resistant barrier at the top of the padding and blocking-off the water from reaching the padding below it. Diaper manufacturers develop SAPs such that when exposed to fluids with urine-like salt levels, the rate at which the SAPs absorb fluid is limited, allowing the urine to pass through the top layer of SAP and get to the bottom of the padding too.

  6. #6

  7. #7

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by DiaperedHonolulu View Post
    The pH of urine when it exits the body should be more or less neutral. It isn't until bacteria start metabolizing compounds in the urine that its pH starts to become a factor.

    What urine has that your tap water doesn't is "salt." How much salt your urine has depends on a number of factors, including your dietary intake and how dehydrated you have been.

    Salt reduces the rate at which super-absorbent polymers (SAPs) can absorb water. When you flood a diaper with pure water, SAP crystals rapidly absorb the water and swell up, forming a water-resistant barrier at the top of the padding and blocking-off the water from reaching the padding below it. Diaper manufacturers develop SAPs such that when exposed to fluids with urine-like salt levels, the rate at which the SAPs absorb fluid is limited, allowing the urine to pass through the top layer of SAP and get to the bottom of the padding too.
    It also depends on the drinks like soda, juice, etc. Normal tap water can vary if water has lead inside from unfiltered taps. You can't see lead but everyone says it's bad for you yet we consume it. I wonder if the salt that your talking about have standard levels. Each diaper is different and it can vary on tests but all should pass the absorbtion test. Like the Abena m4 for example it has regular cotton with small fiber pieces to also lock odors and it teams up with the plastic covering and it's SAP (Like you mentioned) to keep the skin dry when it's wet.

  8. #8

    Default

    I'd also question how similar the two diapers in question are. Two Abena M4s might look identical, but (without knowing the manufacturing process), they might have quite different amounts (or distributions of) SAP and wood pulp. Or, they might have been flexed/compressed differently -- how "fluffed up" they are will affect their absorption rates. Just a thought...

Similar Threads

  1. Balance
    By Foxkit1992 in forum Adult Babies & Littles
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 15-Nov-2011, 17:42
  2. Liquid Hair Remover?
    By malix in forum Adult Babies & Littles
    Replies: 37
    Last Post: 14-Sep-2011, 07:30
  3. Liquid Cooling
    By komodokitty in forum Computers & Gaming
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 07-Aug-2010, 00:16
  4. Health problems: Liquid intake
    By BabbyBruce in forum Mature Topics
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 12-Mar-2010, 14:05

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
ADISC.org - the Adult Baby / Diaper Lover / Incontinence Support Community.
ADISC.org is designed to be viewed in Firefox, with a resolution of at least 1280 x 1024.