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Thread: Anybody try enemeez plus?

  1. #1

    Default Anybody try enemeez plus?

    Enemeez® and Enemeez® Plus | Setting the standard in bowel care

    Apparently because of the topical anesthetic, you don't have a choice about going for No.2 a bit after using one. Interested in trying them, but the price is a bit off-putting.

    Anybody here try them?

  2. #2

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    I use them but with my spinal injury I can't feel it any way. Thy do work fast if you want something quick to happen!

  3. #3

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    Enemeez sound like ghetto-talk for "enemies" ...

    That aside:
    It is a medical product and should not be taken without valid reason.
    Those quick acting enema things can have side effects.

    Also the Benzocaine (the topical anesthetic used in this product) does NOT remove your ability to "operate" your sphincter!
    No that doesn't work.

    What it does it "numbs" the nerve endings and helps people who can't take a dump because it triggers pain and then they involuntarily "cramp" the sphincter even more shut... the whole ordeal can become rather painful and can lead to a number of problems (serious constipations, hemorrhoids, etc.) not to mention quite some discomfort.
    So the anesthetic removes (or reduces would be more accurate) the sensation of pain, and thus helps the patient to relax and have a bowel movement.

    Again: it does NOT weaken or incapacitate your anal sphincter!
    (also consider this: your sphincter is actually closed in its "relaxed" state... you have to strain it to OPEN UP... so if you'd finde some topical cream or whatever that would remove your ability to CONTRACT this muscle - than you'd be seriously constipated and would probably not be able to "go". - at least for some time).


    Also really, using stuff like that for "recreational" purposes is pretty "stupid" medically speaking.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by EPO1 View Post
    Enemeez sound like ghetto-talk for "enemies" ...

    That aside:
    It is a medical product and should not be taken without valid reason.
    Those quick acting enema things can have side effects.

    Also the Benzocaine (the topical anesthetic used in this product) does NOT remove your ability to "operate" your sphincter!
    No that doesn't work.

    What it does it "numbs" the nerve endings and helps people who can't take a dump because it triggers pain and then they involuntarily "cramp" the sphincter even more shut... the whole ordeal can become rather painful and can lead to a number of problems (serious constipations, hemorrhoids, etc.) not to mention quite some discomfort.
    So the anesthetic removes (or reduces would be more accurate) the sensation of pain, and thus helps the patient to relax and have a bowel movement.

    Again: it does NOT weaken or incapacitate your anal sphincter!
    (also consider this: your sphincter is actually closed in its "relaxed" state... you have to strain it to OPEN UP... so if you'd finde some topical cream or whatever that would remove your ability to CONTRACT this muscle - than you'd be seriously constipated and would probably not be able to "go". - at least for some time).


    Also really, using stuff like that for "recreational" purposes is pretty "stupid" medically speaking.
    Are you sure about what you're saying about the benzocaine? I've seen several claims on other sites that the numbing effect makes it pretty much impossible to stop yourself going.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cream View Post
    Are you sure about what you're saying about the benzocaine? I've seen several claims on other sites that the numbing effect makes it pretty much impossible to stop yourself going.
    I'm no proctologist - but frankly speaking I can not see how a topical anesthetic would render your sphincter unresponsive and relaxed.
    There are drugs to achieve that kind of stuff, but not topical anesthetics - and not over the counter ones at any rate.

    The way I understand it is that your sphincter - if all is working properly - does not just "open up and expand".
    it's a type of muscle that is "closed" when relaxed and "opens" when "strained" (expanded).

    And whilst a topical anesthetic might HELP to relax by numbing the sensation - maybe even "messing" with the sensory input you usually would get when you need to defecate - I don't think it will be able to open the sphincter or make you loose control.



    But more importantly: those fast acting "enemas" are basically liquified laxatives... not much unlike the way "ducolax & co" work.
    A tad faster and easier to apply maybe.
    Now it has risks, and side effects (rare, but still there) and its not really considered healthy for recreational purposes.

    Just give yourself a proper (water & 0.9% NaCl (normal saline)) enema... don't go overboard with the quantity and learn how to "administer" it safely.. At least this way you don't mess up your hydration or take meds. all natural and it does work.

    Personally I would NEVER "mess" on purpose... - but this is not the issue here - also I'd certainly not use any laxatives for "recreational" purposes....
    But if I'm severely constipated I'd prefer a natural enema.



    Now the other thing is the other stuff in that quick acting enema:
    It will basically cause your body to rapidly have a BM - and both the urgency and "consistency" will be of a "speedy" nature... and you will, like with any other type of fast acting enema have problems holding it back... and you probably will feel like having less control, as the sensation will be more "sudden" as you've numbed the sensory area.
    That might increase the "effect" but it certainly does not simply open up your sphincter - at least not the benzocaine.

  6. #6

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    Wow ... its quite interesting that people don't really know what happens when you need to defacate.

    Anyways, ill enlighten you as to how it works and then ill tell you about the enema/anaesthetic component in the enemeez.

    There are actually several muscles at work that allow you to maintain your bowel control. There is an internal muscle that sits in the pelvis (called the puborectalis muscle), and there are 2 sphincters that are around the anal opening. The three of these work together to allow control of the bowels. Interestingly, the rectum (the place that holds faeces before you get the urge to defacate) is latin for the work straight. As the name might imply the rectum is actually a straight tube. However, the body uses the puborectalis muscle to create a 'kink' in this straight tube to hold back faeces. It is the puborectalis muscle that we learn to control when we are babies toilet training. When this muscle is contracted it maintains the kink and thus prevents faeces from leaking out. Once the rectum has been stretched enough (usually, because it becomes full of faeces) it sends a signal to the brain telling you that you need to go. It starts the process of relaxing the puborectalis muscle allowing straightening of the rectum and passage of faeces. This process is often overridden however as we are able to prevent ourselves from having an accident and this is simply the brain preventing the puborectalis muscle from relaxing.

    Now i haven't yet had the chance to talk about the 2 sphincters that i mentioned previously. Unlike what most people think these don't play a major role in maintaining continence. They are called the internal and external anal sphincters. As the name implies, one sits more internally and the other sites more externally. The internal anal sphincter is controlled by the autonomic system and thus, this means we have no control over it. This sphincter relaxes when the urge to defacate is present and nothing you can do will cause it to contract close again. The external anal sphincter is a different story entirely. It is usually the "emergency" control ... when you have the urge to go and it is starting to come out but you are trying really hard to prevent it from coming out. The problem with this particular muscle is that it fatigues quickly (meaning that it can on contract for so long before it is unable to stay contracted) and thus, this is often why people who can't control things very well will have an accident. The muscle fatigues and can no longer contract tightly thus relaxing and causing you to have an accident.

    That is the very basics of how defacation occurs. There are a number of other things that go on when you defacate including the use of abdominal muscles to cause abdominal pressure helping to push faeces down and out ... but the basics of bowel control is as specified above.

    Now ... onto the topic of the enema.

    I know there are a lot of people that say that enemas like these are not a good idea. My advice is everything in moderation. There are risks but if you understand what these risks are and how to avoid them enemas are pretty safe. Contrary to what people say, "natural" enemas (or enemas that have just water/salty water) have the same number of risks as these micro-enemas. Neither one is safer then the other. That being said, the big risks you need to understand are dependency and electrolyte imbalances. People who use laxatives to cause bowel movements cause their body to eventually become dependent on these enemas to have a bowel movement at all. Its seen frequently in people with spinal problems as this group of people need to use laxatives in order to have bowel movements (mostly to prevent constipation) but their body requires these enemas. Dependency can happen to people who use either water enemas or these micro enemas. This is because you are artificially stimulating the bowel to create a bowel movement (the water causes some stretch of the rectum as well as softening the stool). So this is a big problem and one that people need to be aware of.

    The other big risk is electrolyte imbalances. Both water enemas and micro-enemas cause electrolyte imbalances when they are administered. However, micro-enemas create more of a disturbance due to the fact that they work by altering the movement of water across the bowel and pulling the water into the bowel as well as actively stimulating the muscle to push creating the urge people get from them. Even water creates an imbalance as water is not meant to be there in the first place (the whole point of the large intestines is to absorb water and thus, putting it there when it isn't meant to be there causes a change in the way things move across (specifically water and some of the electrolytes such as potassium and sodium). Usually, our body can handle the electrolyte changes as they are a huge alteration. But this is a different story if you already have a problem with electrolytes in the first place (i.e. you have been unwell/vomiting/diarrhoea prior). In these instances altering your electrolytes further is a very risky thing to be doing.

    So that is the basics of enemas. In short, if you have an idea what you are doing and are aware of how to avoid the risks they aren't that dangerous. Use in moderation and stay safe. If you aren't sure if you should be using them then my advice is don't use them at all and steer clear.

    Now i can talk about the enemeez with anaesthetics. I have been interested in how well those would work. I understand the idea is to help numb the area so that passage of hard stool is more comfortable (i.e. when your anus is stretched due to the hard stool it won't hurt as much due to the numbing from the anaesthetic). Im a but unsure as to home much else it would really do. On one had i could imagine that in people who normally have control of their bowels there might be a degree of control lost (not to the point where you can't tell you need to go and have an accident). But on the other hand i am very sceptical of if this would happen or not. As i mentioned above it isn't doing anything to the muscles that give you control as these will be able to relax and contract even if you can't feel anything down there. That being said, most of the rectum doesn't have any nerves that are able to sense. As i mentioned before, the walls of the rectum can detect stretch but not much else. (this is why internal haemorrhoids are not painful as they don't have any sensing nerve fibres). However, close to the anal opening there is a special line where nerve fibres come in and supply sensation. This is where the anaesthetic would act on. My gut feeling is that i doubt numbing this area would do very much at all (and if it did it would only be very minor, maybe a slight impairment in control - but not one that would cause accidents).

    So in short, I'm not 100% sure the anaesthetic would help you lose control of your bowels. I think it won't do anything at all to your control of your bowels. That being said, if it did do anything then it would be very marginal in that you may have a slight bit more urgency then anything else but you would still be able to stop yourself from having an accident.

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