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Thread: [WIP]Diaper review website | How do you rate absorbency on a scale to 100?

  1. #1

    Question [WIP]Diaper review website | How do you rate absorbency on a scale to 100?

    I am working on a website that will contain a database of every diaper that is posted or that I have come across.

    I am stuck on trying to think of a way to do the ratings system though. Basically I have a rating system for; Absorbency, Price, and Fit. It is all on a scale to 100 but I can't think of the best way to do it without throwing off the numbers for daytime diapers. If I set the max to be 100 ounces any daytime diaper will look worse then they actually are.


    Here is an example of how the rating system looks: Tranqulity Smart CoreThe Pad Shack


    Link to website: The Pad Shack | A diaper Review site


    If anyone has any ideas please post below.

  2. #2

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    I think I have a start for a system. I could set the cap to be 64 ounces since your supposed to drink 8 cups of water a day. Then I can subtract from that value depending on if the diaper wicks liquids well before it leaks and if it has a lot of press-out.

  3. #3

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    Ratings are almost useless if they're subjective.

    If you want to give something useful, try two numbers: amount of fluid the diaper will hold when stretched flat and having water poured through a tube of some diameter until it runs off the diaper, and then amount of fluid the diaper holds after putting a board on top of it and stacking some weights (say 100 lbs) on top to squeeze it. That'll tell the reader the theoretical max absorption and then how well the diaper retains liquid. Add in the subjective absorbency stuff in the writeup about the diaper.

  4. #4

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    While I absolutely agree that if you want to know the capacity of a diaper scientific measurements and practices are a requirement, there is still value in less objective reviews.

    What a diaper feels like, sounds like, how it holds together while worn all day, how it performs for side-sleepers, and even what it looks like are all subjective and all valuable. Some diapers have enormous capacities, but don't wick well, making most of the diaper useless in real-world conditions.

    Plus, if you look at the subjective reviews elsewhere, they tend to point out the best of the best. Everyone loves the Abena XPlus, Bambino, Tena Slip Maxi . . . the truth will out, as they say.

    -RMS

  5. #5

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    Do not set the max at 64 ounces. Some diapers have a greater capacity, such as the Abena Abri-form X-plus Level 4, the Tena Slip Maxi and the Tena Slip Ultra.

    As actually worn, much of the absorbent mat at the top front and the back of the diaper is not used. We probably only use 40-60% of the total absorbent capacity of most diapers before they leak at the crotch or leg gathers. The Tena Slip Maxi has a maximum capacity of around 140 ounces (4 liters). Its actual working capacity would be around 70 ounces, still more than most people would tolerate unless confined to a wheelchair or to bet.

    --John

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by RMS401 View Post
    What a diaper feels like, sounds like, how it holds together while worn all day, how it performs for side-sleepers, and even what it looks like are all subjective and all valuable. Some diapers have enormous capacities, but don't wick well, making most of the diaper useless in real-world conditions.
    What a diaper feels like is quantifiable, e.g. "thin shoft flexible outer shell" gives useful information. "I really loved how this diaper feels" is rather useless since preferences vary so wildly between people. Wicking ability is also quantifiable (look at XP medicalstesting). A statement such as "this diaper worked well when I slept on my side" is also useless, as it's possible to make any diaper just about leak-proof if taped and positioned right.

    Obviously as the number of subjective reviews goes up, the sense of what's good and what's bad about the diaper will approach the actual performance But then that requires reading a multitude of reviews, and trying to figure out if the guy who said it was terrible and didn't fit him right and he hated the feel of it was just stupid and tried to tape it on inside out (someone literally had that problem in a thread on here a few years back), or if there was actually something to what he said.

  7. #7

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    I'm not sure 1 to 100 is good in most categories.

    You can rate two things for sure that most here are probably looking for.

    How many oz./liters can it hold (measured in various ways) and cost per diaper at the case level. Probably wether they are available in US/UK predominantly or both.

    How high up on the front and back might be important but also subjective, so measureing the length of the diaper makes that useful for comparison.

    Fit is pretty subjective.

    Working capacity, and how to test seems to be the biggest question for me. Personally I think you need a system where you pour 100ml of water down the front and back of the diaper (while wearing), wait one minute, then sit down on a hard chair. Continue to do this until anything leaks out on to the chair and call that the "working absorbency". Now he's the kicker, absorbency is different when laying down because all your weight is not on the crotch of the diaper. So I would test liwing down as a seperate test, puring 100ml every minute until it leaks.

    Test sitting and lieing down absorbency seperately. Another interesting idea is laying on your side absorbency test, I'm sure you would need a tube or something to do this.

    And yet another measurement could be "flood absorbency". Do the same thing with the chair but put 500ml down the front and wait a minute, and repeat.

    You could get a sound meter, and walk back and forth in your room and measure the db of noise. Lots of people care about how quiet they are.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by BouncyBoy View Post
    I'm not sure 1 to 100 is good in most categories.

    You can rate two things for sure that most here are probably looking for.

    How many oz./liters can it hold (measured in various ways) and cost per diaper at the case level. Probably wether they are available in US/UK predominantly or both.

    How high up on the front and back might be important but also subjective, so measureing the length of the diaper makes that useful for comparison.

    Fit is pretty subjective.

    Working capacity, and how to test seems to be the biggest question for me. Personally I think you need a system where you pour 100ml of water down the front and back of the diaper (while wearing), wait one minute, then sit down on a hard chair. Continue to do this until anything leaks out on to the chair and call that the "working absorbency". Now he's the kicker, absorbency is different when laying down because all your weight is not on the crotch of the diaper. So I would test liwing down as a seperate test, puring 100ml every minute until it leaks.

    Test sitting and lieing down absorbency seperately. Another interesting idea is laying on your side absorbency test, I'm sure you would need a tube or something to do this.

    And yet another measurement could be "flood absorbency". Do the same thing with the chair but put 500ml down the front and wait a minute, and repeat.

    You could get a sound meter, and walk back and forth in your room and measure the db of noise. Lots of people care about how quiet they are.
    The way I am testing fit is by how well the tapes work, and if the diaper begins to stretch over time. I have tried some diapers where they will being to stretch and then create sag and gaps, thus making areas for leaks. Fit is going to be more theoretical. This is also why I am making measurements on all of the diapers. This allows people to be able to measure themselves to see how it will fit.




    Quote Originally Posted by jdinvirginia View Post
    Do not set the max at 64 ounces. Some diapers have a greater capacity, such as the Abena Abri-form X-plus Level 4, the Tena Slip Maxi and the Tena Slip Ultra.

    As actually worn, much of the absorbent mat at the top front and the back of the diaper is not used. We probably only use 40-60% of the total absorbent capacity of most diapers before they leak at the crotch or leg gathers. The Tena Slip Maxi has a maximum capacity of around 140 ounces (4 liters). Its actual working capacity would be around 70 ounces, still more than most people would tolerate unless confined to a wheelchair or to bet.

    --John
    Originally I was going to make the max be the top absorbing diaper of all time, but this throws off day time diapers. It makes them look like they have worse ratings , even though the diapers are meant for daytime use. This is why i ended up settling for 64 ounces. Also I have already accounted for press-out and if the diaper even uses all of the padding. This will be subtracted from the absorbency rating. Thank you for helping me to make sure I did not forget anything though.





    Also just to clarify to everyone this is only for the fancy rating bar thing. This is not dealing with the actual test. I just want the fancy rating bar system to match up more with the results.

    Thank you for all of your responses and ideas. I will make sure to consider them. Also on one final note I won't just be using plan old water to test them. I am going to use a solution to simulate urine, because water makes diapers swell more then urine would. This throws off the wet thickness test.

    ALSO ONE MORE THING!!!!!!!

    Does anyone know how I could start up a diaper drive to give to the less fortunate? What I would like to do is when i get diapers to test I use maybe 3 out of the package at most and then give the rest to others who can't afford it. This way I don't end up with tons of diapers on eBay not being sold or my room being filled up with diapers. Although I wouldn't mind having that. xD

  9. #9

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    Check out how XP Medical measures diaper performance. You ought to begin with determining what factors are most important. Then tests can be created for those factors or variables. For your tape test, for instance, you might determine that adhesion is the most important factor or variable. For testing that a sample tape might be stressed using a force gauge until the tape tears loose. That could be done on a clean substrate, say steel, or on a sample of the diaper itself. You'll need to run several tests, depending upon the accuracy you desire and, at the same time, the amount of variation in your test. I'm a quality/process engineer and designing and running tests is something I'm familiar with.

  10. #10

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    I might suggest having two different ratings, one as a play diaper and one as a discreet diaper. As it is now when some gives noise a number I don't know if they mean its super loud or super soft, also someone looking for something discreet will generally give a bad review to something meant for play and vice versa.

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