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Thread: Does anyone have invisible friends?

  1. #1
    RainbowShy

    Default Does anyone have invisible friends?

    I know I've asked this in the past, but my thread is most likely dead.

    I have two. Their names are Veronykah and Joey. I don't talk about them much because people often find it weird. I've had them since I was around maybe twelve? They were adopted after I named a bunch of trains that went by my house. XD When I lived in Maine, I had tons of invisible friends to make up for not having any real life friends.

    Anyway, when I was around four or five, somewhere around there, I used to have a best friend named Elmo. He came up because I used to have an obsession with Elmo from Sesame Street. Well, I used to blame everything on him. My only memory of him is when I was looking out my window. We got into a fight, and he wanted to run away. So, I told him if he did that I would handcuff him to me. ...I was only a little kid then so sue me. LOL

    So, have any of had or still have invisible friends? :O

  2. #2

    Default

    Yeah I have one named Misty Yes from pokemon I thought she would understand how it feels to be looked over since she had other siblings that were favored. She turned into a mommy figure for me since I don't get much in ways of attention or love. I kind think I'm crazy for thinking she near by, but she help me feel wanted.

  3. #3

    Default

    just out of interest;
    do you see your invisible friends as speaking to you from somewhere out-side.... or from somewhere within.....

  4. #4

    Default

    I had a rough childhood - alcoholism and abuse, etc. So I made an imaginary friend to comfort me. He was tall and strong and powerful, and someone I liked to pretend could protect me. A lot of him was Superman, because Superman is my role model, but a lot of him was my own imagination... I could never see his face, because he was sooooo tall that little me couldn't turn my head up high enough. He got me through a lot of bad nights.

    As I get older, I find that more and more of him is reflecting into me, and blending into my personality. It's become almost a well of positive energy and courage that I can draw upon when I need to. Like, a dual feeling of that I am never alone, but that I alone am enough. It's comforting, but in a different and more adult way than before.

  5. #5
    CrinklySiren

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by littlelodgewrecker View Post
    just out of interest;
    do you see your invisible friends as speaking to you from somewhere out-side.... or from somewhere within.....
    I was about to ask this question too lol but i was waiting for someone else to ask it first

    - - - Updated - - -



    Quote Originally Posted by henni View Post
    I had a rough childhood - alcoholism and abuse, etc. So I made an imaginary friend to comfort me. He was tall and strong and powerful, and someone I liked to pretend could protect me. A lot of him was Superman, because Superman is my role model, but a lot of him was my own imagination... I could never see his face, because he was sooooo tall that little me couldn't turn my head up high enough. He got me through a lot of bad nights.

    As I get older, I find that more and more of him is reflecting into me, and blending into my personality. It's become almost a well of positive energy and courage that I can draw upon when I need to. Like, a dual feeling of that I am never alone, but that I alone am enough. It's comforting, but in a different and more adult way than before.
    I might be wrong, but i think this is the effect most imaginary friends have on children who have them. The imaginary friend is a part of you that presents itself to help you cope, until you get older and they meld back into your personality to be expressed by you as the person you wanted to be in the past but couldnt for whatever reason, so in a way that person who is your friend was always a part of you and the older you get, the more you exude that split manifestation of your personality. Very fascinating stuff.

  6. #6
    RainbowShy

    Default

    Well, for me... it comes from not having friends. I have only very few of them in real life as well as online. It's hard for me to trust people, and I feel like having my imaginary friends helps me trust people more. Plus, having autism plays apart as well. With my odd social skills, it's hard to simply make friends too. I don't have any sort of trauma that's caused me to have them, just that I was never very social or made friends easily. It's hard to wean away from them when they are pretty much all you have to understand you.

    I also wouldn't know. I think for me, it's a little bit of both. I kind of imagine them standing beside me talking to me sometimes. I know they aren't real though. I just have an attachment to them as sort of a comfort issue. It helps me understand myself a little better when things don't go as planned, or something like that.

  7. #7

    Default

    I sort-of still have an "invisible friend" he is a "Centaur". I know he is completely imaginary and yet, having conversations with him sometimes alleviates the loneliness I feel as an Autistic older adult.

  8. #8

    Default

    I've never had a imaginary friend but I was always curious of the idea when I was little.

  9. #9

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by CrinklyEmilyLG View Post
    I might be wrong, but i think this is the effect most imaginary friends have on children who have them. The imaginary friend is a part of you that presents itself to help you cope, until you get older and they meld back into your personality to be expressed by you as the person you wanted to be in the past but couldnt for whatever reason, so in a way that person who is your friend was always a part of you and the older you get, the more you exude that split manifestation of your personality. Very fascinating stuff.
    That's almost word for word what my psychologist shared with me. I think you are very right. I like to believe that my need to care for and nurture others stems at least in a small way from that.

  10. #10

    Default

    I had what seemed like a very real visitor when I was little, maybe 4 to 6. I called him the sock, because he would "sock" me (hit me) at night. I may have suffered from night terrors, and I would wake up screaming for my mom. This thing was external, and in my mind, very real.

    As a child, I would hear voices inside my head. They were never distinct enough to understand, but if I wasn't thinking about them, they'd be there in the background. When I was aware of them, it would stop. This still occurs to a small extent. I do believe that during high school and college, I suffered from Borderline Personality disorder, not to an extreme, but to some slight degree. This all seems to fit together.

    I recall not long ago, one of our members starting a thread asking if post traumatic stress syndrome could be a contributing factor to being attracted to diapers and regression. In my case, I see all these things going hand in hand. I was adopted at the age of two, and I grew up in several abusive, poor neighborhoods.

    As another factor, as a child, I had a vivid imagination, and would fantasize all these scenarios, depending on what game I was playing. It doesn't surprise me that members who may regress well, might also have had imaginary friends, and/or played intently with toys or imaginary friends.

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