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Thread: Disney's new DAS card

  1. #1
    RainbowShy

    Default Disney's new DAS card

    Okay, I'm not sure if any of you have heard this, but Disney has recently changed their GAC to a Disability Assistance Pass. Basically, what this means is that if you have a disability that prevents you from waiting in line (IE, panic disorder, Autism, Physical issues...) you have to receive a wait time to come back to a ride later if you can't handle said line.

    Well, there are loopholes to this new DAS card. What are they? First off, most people with developmental disabilities don't have the cognitive ability to understand that if their mom or dad goes to a ride, they aren't going to ride it. Not everyone understands this, even adults who are disabled. On their website, they give you a list of things you can do to prepare your CHILD for this kind of trip. What they don't realize is that not every person with a disability goes to the parks with autism or whatever is a child either.

    Now, another thing about this DAS card is that you have people who have certain diseases. Like, those ones where they can't come in too close contact of someone else because a simple cold could kill them. Yeah, most kids with these kind of diseases like cancer or some other disease can go through Give Kids the World or Make a Wish. You forget one little thing... these organizations are for KIDS with diseases like that, not adults.

    Disney doesn't realize that they are looking at a wide spectrum of disabilities and diseases in both kids and adults. The reason Disney claims to have gotten ride of the GAC is due to the abuse of the system. Yet, how do they know it was being abused when some law tells them they can't ask for proof of the person's disability? It doesn't make sense. Most people have invisible disabilities such as Autism, ADHD, Panic Disorder, Heart Defects... etc. This isn't just about the parents with autistic adults/children either. This about anyone with a disability or disease.

    The GAC had been more comforting to anyone with certain challenges.

    Here's info on the old GAC:

    The GAC is not used to jump the lines, it is used to help special needs travelers get access to attractions that they would otherwise not be able to see due to health, mobility, or major developmental and psychological issues. You may be allowed to bypass the regular lines, but you should still expect to wait. Examples of people who might benefit from using the GAC include folks of all ages and backgrounds, whether their need is temporary or permanent:

    • People with mobility issues that would keep them from being able to stand in long queues who are not using wheelchairs, ECVs or canes;
    • People who are particularly heat or sun sensitive to the point that it endangers their health or safety because of health conditions such as Lupus and Multiple Sclerosis, or people who are on certain medications;
    • Families traveling with special needs children or adults who have health, psychological or hypersensitivity issues that make it difficult to remain in crowded queues;
    • People who are easily fatigued or in pain due to serious health problems (heart, emphysema, arthritis, etc.) who plan to be ambulatory inside pavilions and attractions but park their wheelchair or ECV outside, or choose not to use wheelchairs. They get access to the seating without stairs in shows, for example. Also use of alternate entrances in places where the queue is not mainstream and there are stairs or a climb.


    Articles on the subject:

    In Disney Crackdown, Disabled Kids Are Collateral Damage
    Disney Parks' New Pass for the Disabled Is a Dud: A Dad Breaks It Down - DailyFinance
    Review of the New Disneyland Disability Access Service | Life Rearranged - This one explains more about the DAS. It's not really a review of it.

    So, what are your views on this? Do you think Disney did the right thing? What do you think they should do to make it easier for everyone with disabilities/diseases? Do you think Disney should just go back to the GAC?

    (I had to copy this from the other forums I go on)

  2. #2

    Default

    I know in the case of my full-blown autie half brother he has to be photographed and get his wait time for each ride, as a result of this and of a VIP being bothered by his stimming in line on a previous visit he has gone on fewer rides and visited less often, while the season pass rate goes up. He doesn't try to get to the front of the line if that sarisfies the eugenicists in the crowd

  3. #3

    Default

    Disney is a business. While they are mandated to provide a certain level of accessibility, and while in their particular case there are huge PR incentives to do so, there is a point where they (and everyone else) has to accept that not everyone can be accommodated.

    It sucks but it's reality. Accessibility initiatives are always a fight between the desire of civilized(ish) society to provide the same opportunities to everyone and businesses who don't want to go bankrupt attempting to do so. Accessibility initiatives are usually costly and done at a loss (you install a wheelchair ramp for $10k, and serve 10 extra customers a month). Initiatives that provide extra privilege to people with disabilities can be costly to administer, prone to abuse (which seems the case here), and irritating to other customers. Society decides through law to require a certain level of accessibility while trying to keep things reasonable, and in cases like Disney, PR also pushes for accessibility, but there is definitely a limit.

    Disclaimer: this is coming from someone who neither goes to theme parks nor has any (known) disabilities

  4. #4

    Default

    As long as its a child or adult that has a disability that prevents them from standing in line for long amounts of time I see nothing wrong with making it easyer for them to have a good time, why shouldnt they be able to have a good time with there family.its not like they chose to be disabled so why should they be forced to not have the same opportunities.

    Its people that abuse the system by renting them self's out just because they have a disability that should be banned from the park and should be reported. They obviously realized the system was being abused so maby make it so only one or two people should be able to a company the individual who has the disability like mother and father or close relative.
    Last edited by Eulogy; 08-Feb-2014 at 06:38. Reason: Removing reference to a deleted post.

  5. #5

    Default

    This isn't really related...but I'd be lying if I said I particularly enjoyed my two times going to Disney.

    The stupidly long lines, and the ratio of consumer-trap shops, when compared to actual rides, killed it for me...Frankly I'd much rather go to a place like Cedar Point and ride coaster after coaster until my stomach ended up residing in my noggin.


  6. #6
    RainbowShy

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by mommyslittlewiatt View Post
    As long as its a child or adult that has a disability that prevents them from standing in line for long amounts of time I see nothing wrong with making it easyer for them to have a good time, why shouldnt they be able to have a good time with there family.its not like they chose to be disabled so why should they be forced to not have the same opportunities.

    Its people that abuse the system by renting them self's out just because they have a disability that should be banned from the park and should be reported. They obviously realized the system was being abused so maby make it so only one or two people should be able to a company the individual who has the disability like mother and father or close relative.
    Thank you for this! I was trying so hard to explain this, but I couldn't find a way.

    In all honesty, both my parents are physically-impaired. Walking around the parks with someone like me would not be easy for them, let alone if I have one of my meltdowns. If I see a ride, my mind quickly goes into a mode where I have to get on right away. My mom will use a wheelchair, but my dad prefers walking, so long as he can take breaks to rest and such. He can't walk long distances. The problem is that I'm sure if the CMs saw my mom in a wheelchair, they'd think "well none of you need a DAS". That's one of the problems here. You're looking at a number of diseases and disabilities that used to have so much coverage.

    Now, think of it like this:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Last edited by Eulogy; 08-Feb-2014 at 06:38. Reason: Removing reference to a reference to a now removed post.

  7. #7

    Default

    I like that photo its so true how the work works.
    I'm sorry I'm not very good with abevations what does d.a.s. meen and g.a.c.?

  8. #8
    RainbowShy

    Default

    I forgot now. Just look them up though, and you should get them pretty easily. ^^

  9. #9

    Default

    I have a little brother who is high-functioning on the Autism Spectrum. While I am sure he could qualify for such a pass, I know him well enough that he would refuse such treatment. For him the queue is a part of the experience. However, I do feel that those with altered talents (most call these "special needs") would like some assistance in this area. And this is ideal when these passes are used properly.

    Again, the problem comes when the system is abused. From what I have read this new type of pass is so full of loopholes it might as well be swiss cheese. Its predecessor was more difficult to get ahold of and was so cumbersome for visitors and staff alike that it went almost unused. There needs to be a comprehensive list of conditions which, given proof, will allow the holder to request help when needed and have it rendered within reason.

    In my experience those with altered talents just want to enjoy themselves and not worry about the stresses that face them on a daily basis. To word it differently, they just want to feel normal and smile for once. If a service can do that effectively while preventing aggregious abuse I am all for it.

    - - - Updated - - -

    I have a little brother who is high-functioning on the Autism Spectrum. While I am sure he could qualify for such a pass, I know him well enough that he would refuse such treatment. For him the queue is a part of the experience. However, I do feel that those with altered talents (most call these "special needs") would like some assistance in this area. And this is ideal when these passes are used properly.

    Again, the problem comes when the system is abused. From what I have read this new type of pass is so full of loopholes it might as well be swiss cheese. Its predecessor was more difficult to get ahold of and was so cumbersome for visitors and staff alike that it went almost unused. There needs to be a comprehensive list of conditions which, given proof, will allow the holder to request help when needed and have it rendered within reason.

    In my experience those with altered talents just want to enjoy themselves and not worry about the stresses that face them on a daily basis. To word it differently, they just want to feel normal and smile for once. If a service can do that effectively while preventing aggregious abuse I am all for it.

  10. #10
    RainbowShy

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by KCAboy View Post
    I have a little brother who is high-functioning on the Autism Spectrum. While I am sure he could qualify for such a pass, I know him well enough that he would refuse such treatment. For him the queue is a part of the experience. However, I do feel that those with altered talents (most call these "special needs") would like some assistance in this area. And this is ideal when these passes are used properly.

    Again, the problem comes when the system is abused. From what I have read this new type of pass is so full of loopholes it might as well be swiss cheese. Its predecessor was more difficult to get ahold of and was so cumbersome for visitors and staff alike that it went almost unused. There needs to be a comprehensive list of conditions which, given proof, will allow the holder to request help when needed and have it rendered within reason.

    In my experience those with altered talents just want to enjoy themselves and not worry about the stresses that face them on a daily basis. To word it differently, they just want to feel normal and smile for once. If a service can do that effectively while preventing aggregious abuse I am all for it.

    - - - Updated - - -

    I have a little brother who is high-functioning on the Autism Spectrum. While I am sure he could qualify for such a pass, I know him well enough that he would refuse such treatment. For him the queue is a part of the experience. However, I do feel that those with altered talents (most call these "special needs") would like some assistance in this area. And this is ideal when these passes are used properly.

    Again, the problem comes when the system is abused. From what I have read this new type of pass is so full of loopholes it might as well be swiss cheese. Its predecessor was more difficult to get ahold of and was so cumbersome for visitors and staff alike that it went almost unused. There needs to be a comprehensive list of conditions which, given proof, will allow the holder to request help when needed and have it rendered within reason.

    In my experience those with altered talents just want to enjoy themselves and not worry about the stresses that face them on a daily basis. To word it differently, they just want to feel normal and smile for once. If a service can do that effectively while preventing aggregious abuse I am all for it.
    But that's the problem. It seems like they are taking it out on those with disabilities. Instead of trying to target the source of those abusing it, they decided to change the system in a way that's unfitting to a majority of different conditions. If you saw the picture I posted, it's almost like they are grouping every different condition into one and expecting them to follow one rule.

    People with cognitive delays don't understand the concept of time. So, to make them get return times affects that and causes severe meltdowns to occur.

    - - - Updated - - -



    Quote Originally Posted by mommyslittlewiatt View Post
    I like that photo its so true how the work works.
    I'm sorry I'm not very good with abevations what does d.a.s. meen and g.a.c.?
    DAS = Disability Access System (?) - It has different meanings though.

    GAC = Guest Assistance Card

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