Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Need some dietary advice? (To do with #2's so not offtopic) WARNING TMI GRUESOME STUFF

  1. #1

    Default Need some dietary advice? (To do with #2's so not offtopic) WARNING TMI GRUESOME STUFF

    Can anyone advise me on the best source of INSOLUBLE fibre? Possibly requiring gluten free?

    Let me explain.

    I am eating lots of soluble fibre atm, so my poop is way too squishy, some days more like "the squits". (my keyboard won't remind me how to spel dia-wotsit and I am not willing to embarrass myself with a rather shoddy attempt) so I need advice on good reliable sources of the insoluble stuff to firm up my #2's

    I took up oatcakes instead of standard bread for lunches, but it turns out I appear to be allergic to something in them. (severe "squits" and going up to 8 times a day, sometimes watery, other times even squishier than the norm)

    Can one randomly develop a gluten allergy?

    Incidentally, (warning, going off on a tangent for a moment) why is gluten-free food so fecking expensive?! It's a dietary requirement for medical reasons, not just some celebrity-induced latest fad!?

    Who do I need to talk to about being tested for a possible gluten allergy?

    Thanks guys.

    PS. For Those of you who don't know. Soluble fibre helps make the poops soft and squishy. Insoluble fibre goes through and absorbs the fluid content, making them harder.

    A healthy balance of the two provides with a decent poop that you hardly have to wipe afterwards

    Whereas too much soluble and you're in a soft squishy and sometimes endless mess, too much insoluble fibre and you poop rock hard bullets, looking like rabbit poop.

  2. #2
    RainbowShy

    Default

    Just saying this, but I think the reason is because well... I know that parents of autistic children tend to find gluten-free products to their autistic children. I guess it's supposed to help the child cope with their autism more or something? It's possibly that so many people are relying on it that they know if someone really wants it, they'll pay top dollars just to get their hands on it whether it's for a medical reason or not. :/

    You could always try places like Wal-mart or something (depending on where you live). They almost always have dietary options for people with special needs (dietary, not disability).

  3. #3

    Default

    I wanted to post on this one to answer your question (and to correct a bit of a misconception you have about fibre)

    First off, soluble vs insoluble fibre. The extra bit you added on the end isn't exactly correct and ill explain why. Soluble fibre is called as such because it is soluble (i.e. takes up water). When it does take up water is actually expands and creates more bulk. It has several other effects (of which is not causing diarrhoea) but does cause stool to be soft and well formed. Having plenty of soluble fibre means that is slows the absorption of sugars in the gut meaning that food is processed slower and it makes you feel fuller. If you want to know how soluble fibre works watch what happens when you put a tablespoon of metamucil into a glass of water and let it sit on the bench (that is something that the recommend you don't do before you drink it so i would not recommend drinking it if you leave it sitting out). Metamucil turns into quite a thick mixture so and it is a source of soluble fibre. Natural sources of soluble fibre are oats/bran/lentils/beans if you wanted to know.

    Insoluble fibre is so called because is is not able to take on water. Generally, insoluble fibre acts like a laxative. It speeds up the digestive system and makes things travel faster through the gut. Many harsh/fresh vegetables are sources of insoluble fibre because our digestive system is not able to process/breakdown some of the special proteins that make up plant cells so they are able to pass through intact. The reason why is causes food to move faster through the gut is because it acts partly as a slight irritant as well as causing the gut to stretch (and as the gut stretches it actually works faster).

    You are right that you need a combination of both types of fibres in order to have regular motions as well as well formed ones. However, it is the lack of fibre that causes your stool to be harder. If you want to make it harder i would imagine to add some more protein/fats to your diet as they generally make stool harder (so things like eggs/cheeses/dairy). i don't think i really have a recommendation on what to eat in order to have more solid stools but if you are eating a wide variety of foods then you should be ok.


    As far as gluten. You are able to be tested for gluten intolerance/allergy but there are some important point to remember. The main way doctors look at gluten allergy is to see if you have symptoms of an allergic reaction while you are eating gluten based foods (rash, diarrhoea, nausea, bloating, excessive gas) and then to see if there is improvement after you remove the gluten from your diet. Doctors are also able to perform blood tests but these are only useful if you are consuming your usual diet (i.e. you haven't cut out gluten based products). if you have started cutting the gluten products out then the blood test isn't that useful at all. Lastly, a biopsy can be done by using a scope that the doctor inserts through your mouth and travels down past the stomach and into the small intestines. It is then looked under a microscope to see if there is changes (but again, you need to be eating gluten for those changes to be visible).

    Unfortunately, gluten-free products are expensive as it means that most grains cannot be used. So flour (a common agent used to bake/bind ingredients together) cannot be used an alternatives have to be used (things like almond meal which is more expensive to produce in the first place.

    Hopefully that helps to shed some light on things for you.

  4. #4

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by Zeek61 View Post
    I wanted to post on this one to answer your question (and to correct a bit of a misconception you have about fibre)

    First off, soluble vs insoluble fibre. The extra bit you added on the end isn't exactly correct and ill explain why. Soluble fibre is called as such because it is soluble (i.e. takes up water). When it does take up water is actually expands and creates more bulk. It has several other effects (of which is not causing diarrhoea) but does cause stool to be soft and well formed. Having plenty of soluble fibre means that is slows the absorption of sugars in the gut meaning that food is processed slower and it makes you feel fuller. If you want to know how soluble fibre works watch what happens when you put a tablespoon of metamucil into a glass of water and let it sit on the bench (that is something that the recommend you don't do before you drink it so i would not recommend drinking it if you leave it sitting out). Metamucil turns into quite a thick mixture so and it is a source of soluble fibre. Natural sources of soluble fibre are oats/bran/lentils/beans if you wanted to know.

    Insoluble fibre is so called because is is not able to take on water. Generally, insoluble fibre acts like a laxative. It speeds up the digestive system and makes things travel faster through the gut. Many harsh/fresh vegetables are sources of insoluble fibre because our digestive system is not able to process/breakdown some of the special proteins that make up plant cells so they are able to pass through intact. The reason why is causes food to move faster through the gut is because it acts partly as a slight irritant as well as causing the gut to stretch (and as the gut stretches it actually works faster).

    You are right that you need a combination of both types of fibres in order to have regular motions as well as well formed ones. However, it is the lack of fibre that causes your stool to be harder. If you want to make it harder i would imagine to add some more protein/fats to your diet as they generally make stool harder (so things like eggs/cheeses/dairy). i don't think i really have a recommendation on what to eat in order to have more solid stools but if you are eating a wide variety of foods then you should be ok.


    As far as gluten. You are able to be tested for gluten intolerance/allergy but there are some important point to remember. The main way doctors look at gluten allergy is to see if you have symptoms of an allergic reaction while you are eating gluten based foods (rash, diarrhoea, nausea, bloating, excessive gas) and then to see if there is improvement after you remove the gluten from your diet. Doctors are also able to perform blood tests but these are only useful if you are consuming your usual diet (i.e. you haven't cut out gluten based products). if you have started cutting the gluten products out then the blood test isn't that useful at all. Lastly, a biopsy can be done by using a scope that the doctor inserts through your mouth and travels down past the stomach and into the small intestines. It is then looked under a microscope to see if there is changes (but again, you need to be eating gluten for those changes to be visible).

    Unfortunately, gluten-free products are expensive as it means that most grains cannot be used. So flour (a common agent used to bake/bind ingredients together) cannot be used an alternatives have to be used (things like almond meal which is more expensive to produce in the first place.

    Hopefully that helps to shed some light on things for you.
    Thank you so much for putting me right on the fibre, so I practically had them muddled up. I remembered the two types and vaguely what they do from my GCSE in Food and Nutrition, but I obviously got muddled up along the way.

    It sounds like I need more SOLUBLE fibre in my diet then, as I already eat a lot of vegetables (broad beans, whole baby green beans, brussel sprouts, carrots, brocolli, cauliflower, spinach and baby new potatoes (all freshly steamed)) on a daily basis... I will look into trying pure ryvita crackers again instead of their less healthy "crackerbread".

    There could be another ingredient in "Tesco Scottish Rough Oatcakes" that cause my bowel problems. Especially as I can eat a whole plethora (?right word) of other wheat-based products without a single problem. AND I don't have any of the symptoms you mentioned, just a problem with poops.

    Thank you again for your reply, it has helped me a GREAT deal.

Similar Threads

  1. Homemade bubbles & wipe stuff Suggestions for other cool stuff?
    By SpAzpieSweeTot in forum Adult Babies & Littles
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 02-Feb-2014, 16:30
  2. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 22-May-2011, 08:23
  3. Your Dietary Habits
    By GaashaHuzzah in forum Off-topic
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 26-Mar-2010, 20:29
  4. Replies: 10
    Last Post: 30-Jul-2008, 00:38

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
ADISC.org - the Adult Baby / Diaper Lover / Incontinence Support Community.
ADISC.org is designed to be viewed in Firefox, with a resolution of at least 1280 x 1024.