Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 37

Thread: do you know the phonetic alphabet?

  1. #1

    Question do you know the phonetic alphabet?

    i have always been told that you need to know the phonetic alphabet because you will use it at least once if your life ive now known it for over two years now no need for it yet

  2. #2
    acorn

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by copper360 View Post
    i have always been told that you need to know the phonetic alphabet because you will use it at least once if your life ive now known it for over two years now no need for it yet
    It is like this: Charlie, Oscar, Papa, Papa, Echo, Romeo. The biggest enemy of any verbally relayed message is the Chinese Whisper effect.

    You will need it in professional communications especially where a standardisation is of great importance. Basically its used anywhere where poetic licence need not apply. To name two; military, air traffic control.

    You will find it useful on many occasions in civilian life, but the need to be precise in applying it does not exist. ie. I could use; Chocolate, Orange, Pig, Pig, Elephant, Rat. All that is really important here is that the recipient clearly hears and understands the words used. An example of use here is telling somebody a car licence plate, over the phone.

  3. #3

    Default

    /aj now i ɪntɚnʃənəl θənɛɾɪk lθəbɛt wɪtʃ ɪz ivən bɛɾɚ/

    :P

    Seriously, IPA is very useful.

  4. #4

    Default

    I learned it many years ago in the Military. Something else most people don't understand is what is call military time. The 24 hour clock. Right now my time it would be 23.00, 11 O'clock PM.

  5. #5

    Default

    I had to learn and memorize it as a voice student at Westminster Choir College. In addition, we had to memorize the universal language phonetic alphabet as well. We had to have it on 50 or 100 3 x 5 cards, can't remember which after these many years. We all used to have them with us so when we were standing in lines, we'd be memorizing. Back in the late '60s, if you failed out, you went to the front lines in Vietnam. It was a good motivation for passing, but also terrorizing.

    It helps in singing so that you know which vowel sound you are singing on and sounding while singing text. If every member in a choir uses the same vowel sound for each syllable, the choir sounds better. One also has to know how to handle diphthongs and tripthongs as well. We learned about tongue placement to produce the various vowel sounds. I've often wondered if pop singers discover these things on there own, experimenting with their singing and listening to themselves?

  6. #6

    Default

    I use it everyday to confirm the spellings of customers' names and addresses. Acorn has a point, and I tend to point my coworkers towards the LAPD's version.

  7. #7

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by acorn View Post
    It is like this: Charlie, Oscar, Papa, Papa, Echo, Romeo. The biggest enemy of any verbally relayed message is the Chinese Whisper effect.

    You will need it in professional communications especially where a standardisation is of great importance. Basically its used anywhere where poetic licence need not apply. To name two; military, air traffic control.

    You will find it useful on many occasions in civilian life, but the need to be precise in applying it does not exist. ie. I could use; Chocolate, Orange, Pig, Pig, Elephant, Rat. All that is really important here is that the recipient clearly hears and understands the words used. An example of use here is telling somebody a car licence plate, over the phone.
    Acorn, that info is plain wrong: what you are referring to is the "pilot's alphabet" (or spelling/radio alphabet) (alpha bravo charlie delta...)

    The PHONETIC ALPHABET is what is being used in many dictionaries to explain HOW SOMETHING is pronounced phonetically correct (especially useful for foreign languages).

    This explains the phonetic alphabet nicely:
    The sounds of English and the International Phonetic Alphabet | Antimoon

    (and to the OP's question: yes, learned it back in school, and used it often enough to find it useful)

  8. #8

    Default

    I've seen it, but have never learned it. I have no idea when I would find it useful. People are clearly saying that it is, but I can't think of any examples or any reason why I'd use it.

  9. #9

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by kennyrallen View Post
    I learned it many years ago in the Military. Something else most people don't understand is what is call military time. The 24 hour clock. Right now my time it would be 23.00, 11 O'clock PM.
    it is so some people dont get confused cause if they said 10 and didnt say am or pm they would very confused and i think its easier to understand in briengs. people can get so confused so quickly with things like IPA

  10. #10

    Default

    I learnt it in the cadets. As for usage now, unless one is using a VHF/UHF radio, it's more for trying to spell things out over a dodgy connection.

    I could remember quite a lot of it Now for learning morse code (don't ask me why - I just wanna :P )

Similar Threads

  1. Campaign to remove letters from the alphabet!!!
    By mchkeegan in forum Off-topic
    Replies: 44
    Last Post: 23-Oct-2010, 08:14

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
ADISC.org - the Adult Baby / Diaper Lover / Incontinence Support Community.
ADISC.org is designed to be viewed in Firefox, with a resolution of at least 1280 x 1024.