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Thread: Smoking bans and your thoughts?

  1. #1
    Cherub

    Default Smoking bans and your thoughts?

    After reading zipperless' thread of 'do you smoke', I got to thinking. What do you folks think about state-wide public smoking bans? Some states have them, some do not.

    I used to live in Ohio, it went public smoking ban in November of 2006. I moved to Wisconsin and it went public no smoking July 2010.

    I found a map that shows which sates do and do not have public smoking bans.


    Being a non-smoker I don't mind that it passed. But I would like to hear your thoughts and opinions on the matter.

  2. #2

    Default

    I believe in owner's discretion. Let the marketplace decide if we should have smoking in areas not the state. If people don't want to be in smoky environments they won't go to the places that allow smoking. If they don't mind it, they'll be fine with it. But it's not for states to decide

  3. #3

    Default

    Seriously, when I was a smoker I despised these laws, but since quitting, I now know why.... Most of the time the smell turns my stomach ... Even though once it made me crave.

    It's tough for smokers and I do respect individual rights, but not when those interfere with the rights of others.

  4. #4
    jcrowley1985

    Default

    As a libertarian, I'm against any laws that violate personal liberty. smoking, seat belts, soda size (I'm looking at you Bloomberg), etc. Any law that is restricting something that doesn't hurt anyone but the user. It's their choice.

  5. #5

    Default

    I consider myself libertarian leaning for the most part, though the act of smoking in public places is a funny one - it can be argued, often successfully, that second hand smoke has the effect of taking away another person's right to freedom from personal harm. Soda size and seatbelt laws are definitely make-work programs for the state and can only really be justified in places where there is universal access to health care (or tax funded health insurance) and in reality, so are public smoking bans, but at least I can understand why the public at large would want these in place.

  6. #6
    jcrowley1985

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by Hobbes View Post
    I consider myself libertarian leaning for the most part, though the act of smoking in public places is a funny one - it can be argued, often successfully, that second hand smoke has the effect of taking away another person's right to freedom from personal harm. Soda size and seatbelt laws are definitely make-work programs for the state and can only really be justified in places where there is universal access to health care (or tax funded health insurance) and in reality, so are public smoking bans, but at least I can understand why the public at large would want these in place.
    Universal healthcare is a constitutional right "right to LIFE, liberty, and pursuit of happiness". Therefore you can't infringe on people's other rights to guarantee them their right to life.

  7. #7

    Default

    I"m afraid Cherub that your map is out of date. Virginia became smoke free several years ago, and I gave a sigh of relief when it did. My wife and I would go into a restaurant and ask for the smoke free section, but you could still smell the smoke from the smoking section. Sometimes one section was next to the other, one table "smoke free", the table next to it, "smoking". I suffer from allergies and asthma, and my wife is a diabetic on hemo dialysis. Second hand smoke impacts on our life.

    The problem was that there weren't any restaurants that were "no smoking". The theory was that as long as smoking was allowed, they would lose too much business if they were the only "non smoking" restaurant, and no one would risk being the first in a state that grows and sells tobacco. So when we became smoke free, it was a blessing for us.

  8. #8

    Default

    I was on the verge of leaving North Carolina for good when they debated smoking bans. I figured that if NC, a state with an especially rich history of tobacco production, passed a smoking ban then that would be the end of smoking in public places.

    Personally, I believe that it should be up to the private establishments to decide their policy concerning smoking indoors. If they wish to lose or potentially gain customers concerning their smoking policy, so be it.

    On a more peculiar note, living in MI has produced a curios smoking situation. Since I live in a town with reservations one could go to the reservation's establishments and smoke indoors since it falls under federal regulations and not state. On that note, one wouldn't be able to smoke medicinal marijuana in the reservation's establishments for the same reason despite MI legalizing its use. Just a random note.

  9. #9

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by jcrowley1985 View Post
    Universal healthcare is a constitutional right "right to LIFE, liberty, and pursuit of happiness". Therefore you can't infringe on people's other rights to guarantee them their right to life.
    1 those rights are not in the Constitution but the deceleration of independence 2 the right to live is violated every day with the murder of babies. You can not have it both ways.

    But thanks for the map if I move again I know the smoke friendly states to move to.

  10. #10

    Default

    Here's a question: When marijuana becomes legal country-wide, will it be confined to private places? Imagine sitting at Denny's in a State that allows public smoking, and having your five-year old tripping because the guy in the smoking section is toking up. (You are welcome to berate and disregard this message, as I am not in a proper state of mind.)

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