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Thread: New group: documentaries online!

  1. #1

    Lightbulb New group: documentaries online!

    I just thought I'd let you all know about a new group I've just set up for educational documentaries (as opposed to the fly-on-the-wall variety) that are available to watch online.

    I love seeing a new documentary that opens my mind and teaches me something new. So, if you've seen a good quality, educational documentary that you'd like to share... or if you just want to find a documentary that someone else here has found interesting... or if there's nothing on TV tonight, then please stop by the group!

    https://www.adisc.org/forum/groups/8...es-online.html

    I've only added one documentary so far, but I hope many more will follow.

  2. #2

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    I usually watch a lot of documentaries, they are better than reality shows that are going around these days.

    Ancient Aliens was a good one, even though it seems far fetched, if you watch with an open mind, it's really quite fascinating. It was actually a series of documentaries that had quite a run.

  3. #3

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    just joined. i'll try to get some stuff uploaded to who-knows-where; and depending upon my connecting to a neighbour's Infinity wiffy. it'll mostly be BBC4 stuff, with an 'alas' of that they often begin three-parters, but fail to show the final part

    another 'alas' is that of mytvblog.sumfink having been taken offline. that was probably the best documentary resource on the web.

  4. #4

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    I've added a documentary about fractals and how they are helping us understand nature.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Strontium View Post
    I've added a documentary about fractals and how they are helping us understand nature.
    Oooh! Cool! Thanks, Strontium -- I'll check that out later!

    I have a half-baked theory that aesthetic "quality" correlates with um... "simple complexity"... so, the simpler the iterative formula and the more (apparently) complex the result, the more beautiful something is (does that make sense?! I haven't slept for 2 days... so I might be rambling!). So, things like fractals (which have very simple formulae, yet exhibit a sort-of unpredictable complexity) are beautiful.

    But the most beautiful things are when the "iterative formula" is organically "tweaked" by naturally chaotic forces. Trees are fairly simple with their "bifurcating branches", but environmental factors "tweak" the simple "formula for a tree" so all sorts of "mathematical imperfections" are exhibited.

    The beauty is in "seeing" (conceiving) the simple formula that describes the way a tree grows, whilst also recognising the "complex imperfections" that make each tree unique. The brain looks to reduce what it sees to a simple pattern... It can approximately do this with a tree... but the specific details and nuances defy any reductionist view... And that, I think, is what beauty is.

    Anyway, thanks very much -- I've got something to watch this evening now! :-)

  6. #6

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    Did you watch it ? I love how mandelbrot was slated by his fellow scientists but can now stand tall and say 'I told you so'



    Quote Originally Posted by tiny View Post
    I have a half-baked theory that aesthetic "quality" correlates with um... "simple complexity"... so, the simpler the iterative formula and the more (apparently) complex the result, the more beautiful something is (does that make sense?! I haven't slept for 2 days... so I might be rambling!)
    I understand what your saying (I think) Reversing what your saying may help me see if I have got it right.

    Taking a beautiful complex result, the aesthetic quality is enhanced by the fact its created with a simple iterative formula.

    I hope that sounds right, I used to create fractals using apophysis which manages to hide the maths so well you could forget it was there at all.



    Quote Originally Posted by tiny View Post
    But the most beautiful things are when the "iterative formula" is organically "tweaked" by naturally chaotic forces. Trees are fairly simple with their "bifurcating branches", but environmental factors "tweak" the simple "formula for a tree" so all sorts of "mathematical imperfections" are exhibited.

    The beauty is in "seeing" (conceiving) the simple formula that describes the way a tree grows, whilst also recognising the "complex imperfections" that make each tree unique. The brain looks to reduce what it sees to a simple pattern... It can approximately do this with a tree... but the specific details and nuances defy any reductionist view... And that, I think, is what beauty is.
    Although I'd struggle to describe it so well, I can definitely understand what your saying. The aesthetic beauty is in both the organised natural state and the imperfections that have mutated it. I usually find beauty in the smaller details like the bifurcating veins of a fresh leaf or the crystal frost patterns on a cold window though its macro photography that produces this.

    Damn you I'm split between getting my camera gear out or shopping for a book or two about 'aesthetic' philosophy.
    Last edited by Strontium; 25-May-2013 at 09:44.

  7. #7

    Smile

    I watched it this morning and it was amazing! Rather than discuss it here, I replied to the thread in the group -- hope that's okay :-)

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