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Thread: Early Toilet Training (Recent news articles): Pros and Cons - What are the long-term effects?

  1. #1

    Question Early Toilet Training (Recent news articles): Pros and Cons - What are the long-term effects?

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    So, I happened to come across an article in CBS News that talked about parents who are trying to eliminate the need for their children to wear diapers from as early as birth!

    The article can be found here: "Forget diapers: Parents teaching newborns to use toilet with 'elimination communication'"

    This technique supposedly has a growing number of followers.

    I thought this was more than a little interesting, as there is much discussion and thought as to the reasons why people have an interest in wearing diapers --with a common thought that the timing of their potty training, or how they were potty trained may have had a role in this desire.

    I am curious as to what others may think of this?

    There is another article in the Huffington Post by Steve Hodges, M.D. that refutes the so-called "benefits" of early potty-training and states a number of pediatric and perhaps long-term health concerns that can result.

    It is an equally interesting read and can be found here: A Doctor Responds: Don't Potty Train Your Baby

    Well, as a parent who has already been through children wearing diapers and as an AB/DL myself, I have my own thoughts on this. But perhaps before I share them, I would like to hear others' thoughts before fully divulging my own.

    Do any of you have comments on this one way or another?
    Last edited by TeddyBearCowboy; 29-Apr-2013 at 08:05.

  2. #2

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    Elimination Communication has been around for many years, though it does resurface every now and then.

    I can't say much about it as I'm not a parent, let alone ever potty-trained a kid before. But the idea of running a kid to the bathroom and having a trail of urine and feces all around my house doesn't sound all that appealing. If diapers help mitigate and contain it, I'm all for it, irrespective of what the experts say.

    I think when kids reach a certain age they start to naturally feel shame and embarrassment about having accidents, especially with encouragement from parents. They'll learn in their own time. Besides, for children so young, a long, nurturing diaper change is less traumatic and more of a positive parent-child bonding experience than being scooped up and thrown on a toilet 5 times a day.
    Last edited by Oateson; 29-Apr-2013 at 11:09.

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    it's a fancy phrase for something that has been around forever. as i said much previously, it's a method of toileting a child as one would a dog and, it's roots being in rural settings where it's no big deal and the health implications minimal, it's totally inappropriate for an urban setting (much as letting one's dog foul the pavement/sidewalk is).
    the phrase was coined some time around the 1950s by some idler who's never worked for a living and who wished to justify her existence/get rich by peddling a load of old twaddle to half-witted, over privileged urbanites (our ruling class, no less) who have nothing better to do with their time.

    consequences for the child? apart from having to be kept out of the public realm for the first 4 years of it's life, for health's sake?
    while some people worry about or bemoan the effect that disposable diapers have on children, i remember the days before them, when many a mother would read and be influenced by some dumb magazine article about toilet-training 2 year olds and desperately copy it with the inevitable consequence of puddles of piss in the supermarket or on communal seats.

    if one is to try 'elimination communication', remember that they don't allow dogs in supermarkets, nor any other publicly used private space, for a reason.

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    I think I can buy the article. Certainly not all kids will be the same whether they train early or late. However I have never thought it would be harmful if kids toilet trained later. When I have kids I will use a child-led approach and will let them train when they are ready.

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    I was potty trained at age two, according to my mother, starting exactly on my second birthday. This (combined with other issues, like abuse) caused me to have accidents and wet the bed all the time, until I was 12. They didn't use diapers or pullups, but they did have a plastic sheet between my sheets and the mattress. Anyway, I was often punished for these accidents, including bedwetting, which I am told a child literally has zero control over. But then again, I was punished for quite a lot of things that I did not mean to do, and very often I believe punished for existing at all. Anyhow, I think the fetish may have started with one of these punishments for having an accident due to being potty trained so young (or just, like I said, because abusive environments tend to induce incontinence issues.) It's hard to separate with my background.

    If a child is potty trained young and is not scolded or punished or humiliated because of an accident, I don't think it would cause a fetish to develop. So it's, imo, based on how the parents react and treat the child while potty training, at any age, and not based on the age itself.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by ade View Post
    it's a fancy phrase for something that has been around forever. as i said much previously, it's a method of toileting a child as one would a dog and, it's roots being in rural settings where it's no big deal and the health implications minimal, it's totally inappropriate for an urban setting (much as letting one's dog foul the pavement/sidewalk is).
    I'm sorry Ade, but from my perception, I would have to disagree with you that the roots here being in a rural setting. But who really knows?

    I can only share my perspective that having lived most of my life in a rural setting, these types of ideas seem to actually come from urban rather than rural settings. In most of the sleepy little towns where I come from, there is a lot more time that is available in the home. Hence, diaper chores are just part of the things to be done, and it is not seen as much as an inconvenience or a "status symbol" to have your child out of diapers before the age of two. From my perspective, this seems much more of an "urban" thing, where people want their children to be out of diapers because it takes additional time that they do not have, or perhaps they associate early potty-training as a sign of greater intelligence or learning.



    Quote Originally Posted by ade View Post
    the phrase was coined some time around the 1950s by some idler who's never worked for a living and who wished to justify her existence/get rich by peddling a load of old twaddle to half-witted, over privileged urbanites (our ruling class, no less) who have nothing better to do with their time.

    consequences for the child? apart from having to be kept out of the public realm for the first 4 years of it's life, for health's sake?
    while some people worry about or bemoan the effect that disposable diapers have on children, i remember the days before them, when many a mother would read and be influenced by some dumb magazine article about toilet-training 2 year olds and desperately copy it with the inevitable consequence of puddles of piss in the supermarket or on communal seats.

    if one is to try 'elimination communication', remember that they don't allow dogs in supermarkets, nor any other publicly used private space, for a reason.
    I have to both agree and laugh with you in these comments. Being a cowboy, I am used to getting my boots and pants dirty in all sorts of things such as "green mud". While this does not bother me (as it comes as part of the job) I shudder at the thought of sitting down somewhere in a wet seat and realizing it must have come from human origin. Sorry, but ewww!

    I still have some additional thoughts on this topic that I plan to share, but I am anxious to hear what others may think about this. :

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    Quote Originally Posted by TeddyBr_Cowboy View Post
    I'm sorry Ade, but from my perception, I would have to disagree with you that the roots here being in a rural setting. But who really knows?
    me! well, nearly (got the dating wrong; must've thinking about something else or i could've previously researched further and therefore be totally correct. but, hey...stuff happens. maybe i should diaper my keyboard?)
    Elimination communication - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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    Quote Originally Posted by Oateson View Post
    Elimination Communication has been around for many years, though it does resurface every now and then.

    I can't say much about it as I'm not a parent, let alone ever potty-trained a kid before. But the idea of running a kid to the bathroom and having a trail of urine and feces all around my house doesn't sound all that appealing. If diapers help mitigate and contain it, I'm all for it, irrespective of what the experts say.

    I think when kids reach a certain age they start to naturally feel shame and embarrassment about having accidents, especially with encouragement from parents. They'll learn in their own time. Besides, for children so young, a long, nurturing diaper change is less traumatic and more of a positive parent-child bonding experience than being scooped up and thrown on a toilet 5 times a day.
    I think there's sense in what you say yeah. I attribute my DLism (in-part) to poor potty training by an amateur nanny. I felt terrible shame at the time and that gave gravity to the experience of wearing nappies. I suspect that due care and patience with a child will enable them to make the transition from the one to the other a heck of a lot easier. I have recently had memories flashback to me of being really really told off for messing in a nappy when I was aged 3 and my nanny saying something to the effect of "YOU'VE GOT TO STOP THIS NOW" etc. She was around 19/20 at the time I would have thought; I don't begrudge her but it sucks that I had such a rough time with being DL most of my life until I was an adult. Even now I have to catch myself out of feeling shame sometimes... We're odd things us humans!

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